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I Feel Bad About My Neck: And Other Thoughts…
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I Feel Bad About My Neck: And Other Thoughts On Being a Woman (Vintage) (original 2006; edition 2008)

by Nora Ephron

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2,3771102,635 (3.47)116
Member:snoangel
Title:I Feel Bad About My Neck: And Other Thoughts On Being a Woman (Vintage)
Authors:Nora Ephron
Info:Vintage (2008), Paperback, 160 pages
Collections:2011, Your library
Rating:***
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I Feel Bad About My Neck: And Other Thoughts on Being a Woman by Nora Ephron (2006)

  1. 40
    Heartburn by Nora Ephron (kc.teadrinker)
  2. 10
    Yes Please by Amy Poehler (BookshelfMonstrosity)
    BookshelfMonstrosity: By turns touching and hilarious, these memoirs relate both what it is to be a woman and what Hollywood is really like. Celebrities -- they really are just like us!
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Showing 1-5 of 110 (next | show all)
A few chapters were amusing. It started out promising. But, I would recommend borrowing this from a library. There's only a few funny parts in the book. The rest of it was boring and I didn't identify with her life in NYC/High Maintenance Beauty thing/Gourmet Cooking ramblings. Like others have said, it is a fast read, but not always an interesting one.
( )
  Likeitorlumpit | Dec 3, 2016 |
I was ready to give this a solid 4 stars: a solid collection of essays and columns written by Nora Ephron. They were all good and mostly amusing, although none of them made me laugh out loud.

Then I got to the last essay, Considering the Alternative and she wowed me. She had me laughing out loud at the beginning of it and awestruck at the simple truth of the end of it. This last essay about the truth and inevitability of death is worth the entire book, so I gave it that last half-star.

Also, many quotable bits, but my favorite, I think, is this:

Reading is everything. Reading makes me feel I've accomplished something, learned something, become a better person. Reading makes me smarter. Reading gives me something to talk about later on. Reading is the unbelievably healthy way my attention deficit disorder medicates itself. Reading is escape, and the opposite of escape; it's a way to make contact with reality after a day of making things up, and it's a way of making contact with someone else's imagination after a day that's all too real. Reading is grist. Reading is bliss.

Amen. ( )
  murderbydeath | Nov 27, 2016 |
I don't feel bad about my neck. I might someday be a woman in turtlenecks and scarves, but I kind of doubt it. I've never been divorced, let alone remarried, never lived in New York, I hate cooking, and am fairly indifferent about what I eat. So, pretty much nothing in common with Nora Ephron. She was funny and encouraging and not only will she me missed by her family and loved ones, she will also be missed by untold numbers of fans of her sundry work.


Library copy ( )
  Kaethe | Oct 17, 2016 |
I was hoping this book would be funny, but so far, not so (I'm half done). Kinda disappointing, especially coming from Nora -- I love her stuff. Definitely not a page-turner.

Some things I can relate to, some I can't and some things I'm grateful I have a heads-up on!

It is, however, a decent break from the sad true-crime book I'm reading! ( )
  GettinBetter | Jun 27, 2016 |
This is the most boring book under 200 pages I've ever read.

I read it during phone conversations with other people; that's how little attention it required.

I didn't even need a bookmark; there was no depth to it: if I missed a page or two, who cares?

And I got nothing out of it.

Perhaps Ms. Ephron and I are too far apart in our generations. I tend think it's more that despite the fact that we're both female, we have absolutely nothing in common. I don't even know anyone who could relate to her lifestyle or life path.

I also found the book - and thus perhaps her? - to be shallow. Maybe that's 'cos she gave it less than 150 pages. Maybe that's 'cos she didn't want to share anything of herself (but then, why write a memoir?). Or maybe it's 'cos she was shallow. I'd hate to think a person who put such life into relationships on paper had such a dearth of meaning in her own life.

I also don't really like reading books about how it sucks to be an older woman. I know: I'm getting older. And I know: it sucks. Tell me instead how to deal with it - gracefully, graciously, generously, bravely, daringly, sparingly, meaningfully. Don't tell me denial is a way of life for you, then share "truths" - how would you know the truth? Admittedly you've had your head in the sand until the tide came in and almost drowned you.

I wasn't really keen on Tina Fey's Bossypants. But that blows this away. Thanks, Tina. ( )
  LauraCerone | May 26, 2016 |
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0307264556, Hardcover)

With her disarming, intimate, completely accessible voice, and dry sense of humor, Nora Ephron shares with us her ups and downs in I Feel Bad About My Neck, a candid, hilarious look at women who are getting older and dealing with the tribulations of maintenance, menopause, empty nests, and life itself.

The woman who brought us When Harry Met Sally . . . , Sleepless in Seattle, You’ve Got Mail, and Bewitched, and the author of best sellers Heartburn, Scribble Scribble, and Crazy Salad, discusses everything—from how much she hates her purse to how much time she spends attempting to stop the clock: the hair dye, the treadmill, the lotions and creams that promise to slow the aging process but never do. Oh, and she can’t stand the way her neck looks. But her dermatologist tells her there’s no quick fix for that.

Ephron chronicles her life as an obsessed cook, passionate city dweller, and hapless parent.  She recounts her anything-but-glamorous days as a White House intern during the JFK years (“I am probably the only young woman who ever worked in the Kennedy White House that the President did not make a pass at”) and shares how she fell in and out of love with Bill Clinton—from a distance, of course.  But mostly she speaks frankly and uproariously about life as a woman of a certain age.

Utterly courageous, wickedly funny, and unexpectedly moving in its truth telling, I Feel Bad About My Neck is a book of wisdom, advice, and laugh-out-loud moments, a scrumptious, irresistible treat.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:09:34 -0400)

(see all 5 descriptions)

A collection of essays offers a humorous look at the ups and downs of being a woman of a certain age, discussing the tribulations of maintenance and trying to stop the clock, menopause, and empty nests.

(summary from another edition)

» see all 6 descriptions

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