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Night of the Jaguar by Michael Gruber
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Night of the Jaguar (2006)

by Michael Gruber

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Showing 5 of 5
Gruber's book seem to always have a lot of 'detail' relating to the context of the story; and i generally like that about his writing. In this book, the whole Cuban under-world culture/psuedo-religion-voodoo was an interesting backdrop. However, because of this type of added detail, my sense is that this book simply had 'too-much-going-on! I kept wanting him to advance the story a bit quicker. That's why I only gave it two stars. ( )
  JosephKing6602 | Oct 1, 2014 |
Gruber is interesting. His books are clearly genre, but sometimes it's hard to tell exactly which genre. It's several years since we've last seen Jimmy Paz, who has left the Miami PD for a nice quiet life running his Santeria devotee mother's Cuban restaurant as well as marriage and young daughter. But of course he gets sucked back in by a series of atypical (as in impossible, and mystical) murders to which he is personally connected. The book starts out in the Colombian rainforest with a witch doctor (for lack of a better term) determined to travel to Miami to stop the men planning on looting his tribe's paradise for its mahogany. I mean, that's a story in itself. There's so much in this book, and it's not so much a mystery because you know who's doing the killings, but there is a lot of suspense, and action, and metaphysical musing.... Highly recommended. ( )
  citygirl | Dec 16, 2009 |
After a rough start with the first Paz novel, I think I’ve got him now. The mystical side of things doesn’t really bother me anymore. It’s a schtick and I enjoy watching Paz try and reconcile his rational and his spiritual. Each installment is different in its approach, the last one followed Gruber’s then interest in multi-POV narratives and old sects/documents/secrets while this one sticks to the present and grinds the axe of environmentalism, but not annoyingly so. Paz’s domestication is predictably weakening, but the kid is the least annoying kid I can imagine and so doesn’t grate enough to make me stop reading. Hopefully he’ll get his balls back soon and rejoin the force instead of being a nursemaid.

The mystery in this one is never fully resolved for the cops who get a frame job. But it’s a saleable frame job so they accept it and our true culprit goes to his just reward. He is a figure of sympathy so we never really expect anything bad to happen to him. There are plenty of other characters to revile and they do get what they have coming.

Jennifer’s characterization was really interesting. Both Moie and Cooksey saw something deeper in her that no one else was able to see; instead writing her off as simple and controllable. I liked how they, in their individual ways, encouraged this side of her and I’d like Gruber to write about her journey and arrival in Colombia. That would be fun. ( )
  Bookmarque | Dec 2, 2008 |
Really good yarn. Keeps the story flowing and easy to follow. A bit to 'other worldly' in parts but overall verry good.
  MarkKeeffe | Nov 17, 2008 |
I loved Tropic of Night, it was deliciously frightening for me, but I just haven't enjoyed any of the other Paz books. I'm not sure what it is-- maybe that I just don't like the Paz character very much, or how long it takes him to own up to the supernatural events happening around him. I read the second Paz book, Valley of Bones, with some impatience, but enjoyed it enough to attempt Night of the Jaguar... and could not get past the first ten pages. ( )
  mfred333 | Jul 16, 2008 |
Showing 5 of 5
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 006057769X, Mass Market Paperback)

Jimmy Paz returns for a final adventure in the highly anticipated sequel to "Tropic of Night" and "Valley of Bones. The acclaimed author Michael Gruber's most accessible and also most provocative work to date, "Jaguar" completes the "Paz" trilogy as only the author dubbed "the Stephen King of crime writing" ("The Denver Post") could. A shaman from the South America arrives in Miami, determined to prevent the despoiling of his tribe's native land. When Cuban businessmen begin dying in gruesome fashion, seemingly eaten alive by a massive jungle cat, Jimmy Paz, Miami's expert criminal investigator into the deeply weird, is called back from retirement to find the killer. But Paz has problems of his own: he and his daughter Amelia's nights are both haunted by dreams of a jaguar who has come to take her as a sacrifice ...

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:15:00 -0400)

(see all 3 descriptions)

Miami detective Jimmy Paz risks everything to save his daughter and stop a series of murders involving the gruesome killings of affluent Cuban-American businessmen, crimes that could be tied to the murder in Colombia of an American priest and the arrival in south Florida of an Indian shaman armed with the power of his god, Jaguar.… (more)

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