HomeGroupsTalkZeitgeist
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Ganymede (Clockwork Century 4) by Cherie…
Loading...

Ganymede (Clockwork Century 4) (edition 2011)

by Cherie Priest

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
2962038,453 (4.09)19
Member:SunnySD
Title:Ganymede (Clockwork Century 4)
Authors:Cherie Priest
Info:Tor Books (2011), Edition: Original, Paperback, 352 pages
Collections:Your library
Rating:****1/2
Tags:fiction, period history, alternate history, civil war, the South, zombies, airships, steampunk, pirates, submarines, New Orleans, brothels, rebels, secrets

Work details

Ganymede by Cherie Priest

None

None.

Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 19 mentions

English (19)  French (1)  All languages (20)
Showing 1-5 of 19 (next | show all)
This book in the Clockwork Century series has air pirate Andan Cly thinking about quitting the business and settling down in Seattle to be near Briar Wilkes, now sheriff of the broken city. He intends to quit running the Blight gas to the people that make it into the horribly damaging drug Sap. To do this, he must have his airship refitted into a regular cargo ship, not possible in Seattle. By coincidence, he is offered two jobs at the same time- one from the new head of the city to make a supply run, and another, mysterious one, from an ex-lover, Josephine, in New Orleans. He can take care of all three of these things in one trip! Of course, he doesn’t know what Josephine’s job entails, but that’s not something to worry him too much.

Once down in New Orleans he finds that the Texians are holding the city under martial law. It seems they are looking for a machine- a machine that could end the Civil War (which has been going on for over 20 years in this universe). This machine, the Ganymede of the title, is an ‘underwater airship’, and the people who attempt to run it keep dying in the attempt. This is where Cly comes in; Josephine thinks that an airship pilot will have better luck with it than a boat captain. Of course, because of the Texians, the Ganymede must be moved in complete secrecy, which doesn’t make it easy to work out any problems in running it.

Unlike the other books in this series, Ganymede doesn’t move along with breakneck speed. There is much less action; almost none until near the end of the book, when there is a great battle scene on and in the water. There is a lot of suspense: will they get caught by the Texians? By zombies? Will the Ganymede kill them, too, or will they figure out how to pilot it safely? Why are there zombies down in New Orleans, anyway, when they originated in Seattle via exposure to the Blight gas? The pace is very different from the other Clockwork Century books, but different isn’t a bad thing. ( )
  dark_phoenix54 | May 22, 2013 |
review to come. ( )
  DawsonOakes | Apr 10, 2013 |
There is no way for me to do a sensible, scholarly review of this book or any of the books in the Clockwork Century series. All I can say is that I loved this, and that Ms. Priest had me before Marie Laveau but I squealed in delight when she appeared. I'm thrilled with the gentle, low-key touch of romance as well as the breathless action, and just delighted to pieces with the whole book. ( )
  Jammies | Mar 31, 2013 |
Every Clockwork Century book has been better than the one before, in my view. Ganymede is no exception. It's got the requisite strong female lead, huge and mysterious steam-driven war machine, zombies, and very loosely interpreted American history. And it's got what keeps making the series more and more interesting to me - scope.

Ganymede continues the trend in addressing more and more of the larger political scene in this alternate America where the Civil War has dragged on for twenty years. And while the zombies are definitely a sub-plot to that, they make a very creepy backdrop and make it very clear that they're going to be an integral part of the finale. New Orleans is a great setting for pretty much everything, and hey, strong, independent woman of color as the main character! How often does that happen?

I tore through Ganymede in half a day, and am only sorry that I have to wait for the next one. ( )
  JeremyPreacher | Mar 30, 2013 |
The Clockwork Century books are among my favorite steampunk series. This book was very slow to get going for me, and it took a long time for the two main characters to come together. The book did irk me with the annoying 19th century cliche of "the harlot with a heart of gold"; too many books in that time period either use women as a doting mother or as a prostitute. Mind you, Priest is an excellent writer, and Josephine's character slowly grew on me. I really liked the male viewpoint, Cly, with his gruff way of looking at the world and his sweet regard for Briar back in Seattle.

The first and most famous book of this series, Boneshaker, darkly portrayed the city of Seattle as a wall-up city filled with noxious gas and killer zombies. As the series has gone on, it's explored the repercussions this had had across America--namely, that the zombie-causing gas can be filtered to a very potent drug, and that drug also turns people into zombies. It creates an interesting ripple effect and I'm curious about where Priest will take that development.

The most compelling element of Ganymede is the titular submarine. This is a subject of particular interest to me. I've been a Civil War buff since I was a kid, and I happened to be living in South Carolina in 2000 when the Hunley rose from the ocean and made its belated return to shore. In the world of the Clockwork Century, the Civil War has dragged on for twenty years, and Ganymede is part of Hunley's lineage. Priest did her research--and certainly twiddled with history--but Ganymede has a sense of realism to it.

In all, a good addition to the series, though the second book (Dreadnought) remains my favorite. ( )
  ladycato | Feb 5, 2013 |
Showing 1-5 of 19 (next | show all)
no reviews | add a review
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Series (with order)
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
Quotations
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Publisher series
Original language

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English (1)

Book description
Haiku summary

Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0765329468, Paperback)

The air pirate Andan Cly is going straight. Well, straighter. Although he’s happy to run alcohol guns wherever the money’s good, he doesn’t think the world needs more sap, or its increasingly ugly side-effects. But becoming legit is easier said than done, and Cly’s first legal gig—a supply run for the Seattle Underground—will be paid for by sap money.

New Orleans is not Cly’s first pick for a shopping run. He loved the Big Easy once, back when he also loved a beautiful mixed-race prostitute named Josephine Early—but that was a decade ago, and he hasn’t looked back since. Jo’s still thinking about him, though, or so he learns when he gets a telegram about a peculiar piloting job. It’s a chance to complete two lucrative jobs at once, one he can’t refuse. He sends his old paramour a note and heads for New Orleans, with no idea of what he’s in for—or what she wants him to fly.

But he won’t be flying. Not exactly. Hidden at the bottom of Lake Pontchartrain lurks an astonishing war machine, an immense submersible called the Ganymede. This prototype could end the war, if only anyone had the faintest idea of how to operate it…. If only they could sneak it past the Southern forces at the mouth of the Mississippi River… If only it hadn’t killed most of the men who’d ever set foot inside it.

But it’s those “if onlys” that will decide whether Cly and his crew will end up in the history books, or at the bottom of the ocean.

(retrieved from Amazon Mon, 30 Sep 2013 13:18:36 -0400)

"The air pirate Andan Cly is going straight. Well, straighter. Although he's happy to run alcohol and guns wherever the money's good, he doesn't think the world needs more sap, or its increasingly ugly side-effects. But becoming legit is easier said than done, and Cly's first legal gig--a supply run for the Seattle Underground--will be paid for by sap money. New Orleans is not Cly's first pick for a shopping run. He loved the Big Easy once, back when he also loved a beautiful mixed-race prostitute named Josephine Early--but that was a decade ago, and he hasn't looked back since. Jo's still thinking about him, though, or so he learns when he gets a telegram about a peculiar piloting job. It's a chance to complete two lucrative jobs at once, one he can't refuse. He sends his old paramour a note and heads for New Orleans, with no idea of what he's in for--or what she wants him to fly. But he won't be flying. Not exactly. Hidden at the bottom of Lake Pontchartrain lurks an astonishing war machine, an immense submersible called the Ganymede. This prototype could end the war, if only anyone had the faintest idea of how to operate it.... If only they could sneak it past the Southern forces at the mouth of the Mississippi River... If only it hadn't killed most of the men who'd ever set foot inside it. But it's those "if onlys" that will decide whether Cly and his crew will end up in the history books, or at the bottom of the ocean"--… (more)

(summary from another edition)

» see all 2 descriptions

Quick Links

Swap Ebooks Audio
1 avail.
103 wanted
2 pay1 pay

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (4.09)
0.5
1
1.5
2 1
2.5
3 8
3.5 11
4 30
4.5 9
5 18

Audible.com

An edition of this book was published by Audible.com.

See editions

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

Help/FAQs | About | Privacy/Terms | Blog | Contact | LibraryThing.com | APIs | WikiThing | Common Knowledge | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | 91,500,598 books! | Top bar: Always visible