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The Witch's Tears by Jenny Nimmo
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The Witch's Tears

by Jenny Nimmo

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Reason for Reading: Specifically I am collecting this publisher's list under the title of "First Modern Classics" aimed at younger readers originating from the UK house. The titles on this list, which started in 2009, all by British authors, are a unique selection for North American readers, though a few international classics are included. I knew nothing of this author or title.

This book is certainly aimed at the younger ages, though it may prove frightening or tense for some as the father is the one in peril from a real life situation, being lost on the roads on the way home in a snow storm. We never experience this from the father's point of view though and otherwise the story is light-hearted with the family being visited by a good witch, though they don't know it. A cute story, short and easy to read with lots of fantasy elements and a heart warming ending. I wonder at the inclusion of this title in this publisher's series though as the other books I've read have been much more outstanding. Still worth the read, especially for the younger set and those looking for a "good witch" story.

Finally, an aspect of the "First Modern Classics" series I really like is first at the beginning there is a short paragraph by a famous author called "Why You'll Love this Book" which Lynne Reid Banks provides in this instance. Then at the back there is "More Than a Story" section with its own Table of Contents. This one includes lots of riddles and several recipes relevant to the title. Also included is a list of signs to look for in a witch from the old puritanical days, a portion of Shakespeare's Macbeth's witches' scene "double, double, toil and trouble..." and a witches from history section that includes, among others, both Baba Yaga and Anne Boleyn (remember that 6th finger!). A quick, cute read. ( )
  ElizaJane | Nov 24, 2010 |
Most of us can remember a time of being scared that a parent wouldn't come home and Nimmo endearingly uses this theme along with elements of mystery and childhood suspicion to create a vivid story not soon to be forgotten by readers. The positive, magical and heartwarming ending ensures a gentle end for younger readers, many of whom will have likely made a personal connection to a feeling of fear or loss. ( )
  apendry | Sep 26, 2010 |
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A stranger shows up during a winter storm, and Theo thinks she is a witch.

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