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The Last Manchu: The Autobiography of Henry…
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The Last Manchu: The Autobiography of Henry Pu Yi, Last Emperor of China (1964)

by Pu Yi (Author)

Other authors: See the other authors section.

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323734,306 (3.63)2
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  1. 00
    Puyi, my husband. The last emperor or China [我的丈夫溥仪中国末代皇帝] by Wang Qingxiang [王庆祥] (edwinbcn)
  2. 00
    Twilight in the Forbidden City by Reginald F. Johnston (edwinbcn)
    edwinbcn: Pu Yi did not particularly like Johnston, so Johnston is all but omitted from the autobiography. However, Johnston's books gives a lot of insight into the historical and technical backgrounds of the Forbidden City Household.
  3. 00
    The last eunuch of China. The life of Sun Yaoting by Jia Yinghua [贾英华] (edwinbcn)
    edwinbcn: Life in the Forbidden City, and the transition from Imperial Power to New China, and the stages in between. This book presents the view from a servant. Excellent companion of The Life of the Last Emperor, which presents the view from the ruler.
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Showing 1-5 of 7 (next | show all)
Exceptionally good. Enjoyed the movie years ago (Last Emperor), but appreciate it even more after having read this auto-biography. ( )
  GTTexas | Dec 31, 2011 |
This autobiography traces the unique life of Henry Pu Yi, the last emperor of China, from when he first ascended the throne at 2 years 10 months of age, through his time in hiding, to his time puppet ruling Manchukuo for the Japanese in WWII, to his thought reform under the communists.

The first 3/4 of the book will make you very angry at Pu Yi. He is incredibly self-centered with all of his focus being on his own continued life and continuing imperialism in China. He not once thinks of the good of the Chinese citizens, let alone those in his own household. He even routinely beats them and sees nothing wrong with this. It takes thought reform under the communist Chinese for him to see his flawed character and false perception of the world. Although the translator calls this time-period his "brain washing," I think that is a biased view. Pu Yi never once recalls being tortured or dehumanized by the communists. He is put in a cell with others, forced to take care of himself for the first time in his life, shown he is not above others simply because of who his parents were. He reads and studies communism and comes to regret how he treated those beneath him when he was emperor and afterward. He comes to see flaws in his character and simply wants to find a career and contribute to China. This transformation is fascinating and makes the read worth it, although I do believe this autobiography will mainly only appeal to those with an interest in Chinese history.

Check out my full review: http://wp.me/pp7vL-ya (Link live August 16, 2011) ( )
  gaialover | Aug 15, 2011 |
Last Emperor of China by Pu Yi (Author) (1964)

Last Emperor of China 1 July 1917 – 12 July 1917 he was a member of the Chinese People's Political Consultative Conference from 1964 until his death in 1967. Those 12 days, one small bomb was dropped over the Forbidden City by a republican plane, causing minor damage the first aerial bombardment ever in Eastern Asia.

Aisin-Gioro Puyi (simplified Chinese: 溥仪; traditional Chinese: 溥儀; pinyin: Pǔ yí) (7 February 1906 – 17 October 1967)
Emperor Pu Yi is the last Emperor of the Dynasty before the Chinese Republic. The first President of the Republic of China Yuan Shikai,claimed the title of "Emperor of China"

The most interesting people living in China, never using an individual's clan name on complete contravention with the old Chinese and Manchu rule, a way to desecrate the old order quite young at that time see what all this people perceive by sight or have the power to perceive, that December 2, 1908 Pu-Yi became Emperor of a country of China, under the reign name Hsuan T'ung. Puyi succeeded to the Manchu throne at the age of three, when his uncle, the Guangxu emperor, died on Nov. 14, 1908,become the 12th emperor of Qin. The Forbidden City in Beijing. It is a complex composed of several buildings in a variety of styles, including the architectures of Chinese, Japanese, and European.

Was courted by the Japanese who had acquired the former German concessions in Manchuria In order to bring the region under their control the Imperial Japanese Army for China's last emperor Puyi to live in as part of his role as Emperor of the Japanese puppet state of Manchukuo 1945. After the fall of Manchukuo, the palace was damaged when Soviet troops looted Xinjing ( )
  tonynetone | Nov 8, 2010 |
The autobiography of Pu Yi - the last emperor of China. This was an interesting book, but seemed to be done rather carefully. As another reader mentioned, I wonder if it would have been different if it was written outside of China. It's really a rather human story of a man trying to stay alive and trying to keep his standard of living. Once imprisoned by the Communists, he really does suffer mentally from abuse by those that were "loyal" to him while he was the emperor. I found that very sad. A really good read and worth the buy if you want non-fiction books related to Chinese history. ( )
  autumnesf | May 20, 2008 |
Unforgettable story, historically fascinating. ( )
  sungene | Oct 29, 2007 |
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» Add other authors (23 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Pu YiAuthorprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Kramer, PaulEditor, Preface & Epiloguesecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Kuo Ying Paul TsaiTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Vos, Helga en JanTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0671651889, Mass Market Paperback)

“Important and fascinating.” —The New York Times

In 1908 at the age of two, Henry Pu Yi ascended to become the last emperor of the centuries-old Manchu dynasty. After revolutionaries forced Pu Yi to abdicate in 1911, the young emperor lived for thirteen years in Peking’s Forbidden City, but with none of the power his birth afforded him. The remainder of Pu Yi’s life was lived out in a topsy-turvy fashion: fleeing from a Chinese warlord, becoming head of a Japanese puppet state, being confined to a Russian prison in Siberia, and enduring taxing labor. The Last Manchu is a unique, enthralling record of China’s most turbulent, dramatic years. 16 b&w illustrations

(retrieved from Amazon Mon, 30 Sep 2013 13:35:32 -0400)

(see all 3 descriptions)

In 1908 at the age of two, Henry Pu Yi ascended to become the last emperor of the centuries-old Manchu dynasty. After revolutionaries forced Pu Yi to abdicate in 1911, the young emperor lived for thirteen years in Peking's Forbidden City, but with none of the power his birth afforded him. The remainder of Pu Yi's life was lived out in a topsy-turvy fashion: fleeing from a Chinese warlord, becoming head of a Japanese puppet state, being confined to a Russian prison in Siberia, and enduring taxing labor. The Last Manchu is a unique, enthralling record of China's most turbulent, dramatic years.… (more)

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