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The Fault in Our Stars by John Green
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The Fault in Our Stars (original 2012; edition 2012)

by John Green

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10,043908284 (4.37)591
Death / cancer has never been so beautiful
  deadgirl | Apr 19, 2012 |
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RGG: The voices of the two main characters are mesmerizing, so while the premise and plot may seem a bit thin, the novel is intensely engaging and the messages ring true. A few sexual scenes. Reading Level: YA+.
  rgruberhighschool | Mar 28, 2015 |
I had no intention of staying up all night reading The Fault in Our Stars when I borrowed it up from my library’s digital book collection last Saturday, but somehow I did. I also had no intention of speed-reading through it, sobbing my eyes out and emptying a whole box of tissues in doing so, but I found myself staring at a pile of soggy tissues and wondering WTF I was thinking picking up such as sad book. (THIS IS WHY I HATE READING SAD BOOKS) Regardless of my hatred of a sad ending, I still found it in my heart to fall in love with The Fault in Our Stars.

Maybe it’s because one of the biggest themes of the story (not letting chronic illness rule our lives) hit home on my own chronic illness journey. This book was so relate-able in a way that anybody affected by chronic illness could draw comparisons to in their own lives. I respond well to characters I can relate to and I know that other people do as well. The Fault in Our Stars is one of the rare books where I didn’t hate any of the characters. It was fascinating how Green depicted these characters, it was really interesting to see how John imagined people would respond to facing their own mortality.

Hazel has spent her terminal diagnosis worried about how her death will affect her surviving family. She rarely cries or complains (unless someone says something stupid in trying to show sympathy – this happens to me often as well, so I mostly applauded her), only worries about her mom and dad putting their lives on hold to watch their only child die. Even though Hazel hates to admit it, I found her to be an incredibly inspiring and selfless main character. She is definitely one of the best young adult fictional role models out there, in my humble opinion. Reading about her struggle has taught me I need to stop and think who is listening before I complain about my aches and pains. The only problem I had with hazel is that she hated V for Vendetta!! How is that even possible??

Augustus was no slouch in terms of main characters, either. He feels a lot of loyalty and love for his friends – even when others may consider said friends to be bigger pains in the butt than they are worth. Gus is also pretty swell at reading people, and it was fun to watch him maneuver Hazel into finally living.

To sum up, Hazel and Gus were stellar main characters. They found a way to live life to the fullest for as long as they were given in a way that healthy people might never understand, but I do. People who scoff at learning life lessons in fiction, should read The Fault in Our Stars. Hell, everybody should read this book – even if you are like me and hate shedding tears or sad endings. Hazel and Gus are so worth the price of swollen eyes and a runny nose. You’ll need an inconvenient amount of tissues, but you’ll come out of the love story of Gus and Hazel glad you finally read it. I sure was! ( )
  One_Curvy_Blogger | Mar 28, 2015 |
I wish I could give this book 100 stars. ( )
  katiejo2324 | Mar 28, 2015 |
I wish I could give this book 100 stars. ( )
  katiejo2324 | Mar 28, 2015 |
The book is a well written story. The author's work was amazing at discovering the funny, tragic, emotional trials of terminal illness and of being young and in love. The book kept my interest and was gut-wrenching to read, especially with the turns in the story. The story was very realistic and believable in nature. This book is definitely for older middle readers with a heavy topic of terminal cancer.
  stacey.abrahamson | Mar 26, 2015 |
I had a hard time choosing a rating for this book. The writing and plot are very good. However, it is ultimately a teenage romance, which is not my cup of tea (I picked it up mainly because it was on the Kindle Book Club list for December).

After thinking about it for a couple of days, it occurred to me that the fact I though of it as a teenage romance was the best reason to give it a higher rating. I didn't think of it as a tragic story (although it is), or as a "teenagers with cancer romance". By weaving the issues of dealing with cancer into the very fabric of his characters, the author made it seem like just another problem. It was as if cancer for these kids was like a case of bad acne. They accepted their illness and, ultimately, would not allow it to define who they were.

( )
  grandpahobo | Mar 23, 2015 |
the fault in our stars is a book about hazel grace. hazels mom thinks hazel is depressed so she sends her to a therapy group. the group has a lot of kids who have cancer like hazel. hazel has lung cancer. hazel meets Augustus and falls in love. hazel loves the book an imperial affliction and decides to go to Amsterdam. the book author ended up being a jerk in their minds. Augustus was soon sick again with his cancer. Augustus died and hazel read the note he was supposed to read at her funeral.
this book was a really great book. the way hazel and Augustus loves each other was described very well. I was really interested. all of my friends said it was really good and I thought so to. I also loved the movie. the way everyone treats each other was really cool. ( )
  HaleyC.B4 | Mar 22, 2015 |
-Spoiler Alert!-

The Fault in Our Stars, by John Green, is a moving story about love and cancer. Hazel, the main character, has lung cancer. Her mom sends her to a support group because she believes that Hazel is depressed. However, Hazel finds it completely boring and therefore HATES it. One day, at the support group, her life changes. She sees a boy named Augustus, who is a friend of Issac (Issac has eye cancer). The two people get to know eachother and Hazel shares her favorite book with him: An Imperial Affliction. The book ends in suspense, so both Augustus and Hazel have a common ambition to ask Peter Van Houten (the author) how the ending turns out. They both go to Amsterdam, where Van Houton lives, and ask him how he imagines the ending of An Imperial Affliction. To their great suprise, the author they revered was an absolute jerk to them. Disappionted, the two travel home. A few days later, tragedy strikes. Cancer stabs Augustus in the back and he dies. At his funeral, Hazel meets Van Houten and he tells her that the reason he wrote the book was that his daughter had cancer and died. Hazel later discovers that Augustus had written a sequel to An Imperial Affliction. Surprise, Hazel gets the happy ending of a fan's dream.

The Fault In Our Stars is a very moving book artfully designed for everyone teens and above. It brings out the emotions that are hidden inside, even in the most secretive person. It definitely deserves a 5-star rating. Even though some of the events were easy to predict, there are some parts that keep you on your toes. The Fault In Our Stars was very riveting - I read it in two days! This novel will make you want to curl up on your couch, and to run up and down the stairs with joy. It will make you want to punch your pillow continuously, and it makes you happy that you are YOU! ( )
  MeganS.B3 | Mar 19, 2015 |
This book had it all, laughter, sadness, grief, and love. An amazing book by John Greene (who I follow on vlogbrothers on youtube). This book was a big hit at our school last year as it was read in many Frosh English classes.
  sbalicki | Mar 16, 2015 |
I thought at just around midnight that I would just read a few pages and then fall asleep. Not to be. I smiled, I cried, and finally finished the book a few minutes ago. (I am calling this the 3am review).

Even though I think the dialogue improbable for 16-17 year olds, I loved the book. Maybe because I too have lost a loved one to cancer, but then again, love and pain are universal, and you do not need the exact experience to recognise it. Glad I read it, but not quite sure how I will now succeed in sleeping... ( )
  CeliciaS | Mar 15, 2015 |
Personal Review: This story is one of the most heart-grabbing stories I've ever read. The reader is wanting the best and rooting for the characters throughout the whole book. As serious as the story is, it is believable and beautiful.

Curricular Connections: This books offers a nice oportunity for comparing and contrasting characters. Hazel and Augustus both deal with terminal illness, but go about it differently. There may also be opportunity to study the meaning behind the author character, as well as the helplesness of the parents involved.
  LeslieRivver | Mar 14, 2015 |
A random YA find at the library, I'd put this in my Top 3 reads of the year. A novel about two teenagers with terminal cancer (wait! don't run screaming for the exits yet), this book was equal parts bittersweet and hilarious. ( )
  captnkurt | Mar 10, 2015 |
I had mixed feelings about this.
The dialogue between Hazel and Augustus's dialogue didn't seem natural. Do teenagers really talk like that in reality? Though, I found the growing friendship with their disabilities immensely moving. Very sad and bittersweet ending. ( )
  gogglemiss | Mar 7, 2015 |
Gripping story although some of the emotional insight is forced onto the reader which at times gives it a heavy-handed feel. ( )
  Eric_White | Mar 4, 2015 |
This is, by far, one of the hardest reviews I have had to write. I had actually won a print copy of this book in a giveaway or contest or blogging event of some sort last year, though I cannot currently remember which. I then proceeded to use my audible credit to acquire it this month. I then took the Kindle version out from a friend's public library (as she was kind enough to allow me to use her login for ebooks, since she does not use the service and my library sucks).

I read this book in about 24 hours, and my emotions are so all over the place that I fear this review will be incoherent and rambling at best, but I have to write it. I have to get the thoughts out of my head or I will not be able to sleep. This is the second night in a row that this book has kept me awake.

I both love and hate this book and the author right now. I am so thoroughly pissed at the outcome, and then also so thoroughly lost for the unanswered questions that I am left with. Much like "An Imperial Affliction" left Hazel struggling, desperate to know what happens before she dies, I have the same kind of inner turmoil over the outcome for this book.

Additionally, I thought that I would be forever changed for having seen "A Walk to Remember," and this was an even grander roller coaster ride. I feel as a soaking wet towel, wrung vigorously and left hanging in a twist over the shower curtain. I am not even sure how to put this into words properly.

John Green has taken my shriveled cynical heart and left it bleeding on the floor, utterly without a sense of why it is no longer within the confines of my ribcage. I was so invested in the characters of Gus and Hazel, and I now wonder what I will do without their story to fill my heart. Damn you, John Green! Why must you toy with my emotions so. Now I have to go read more of your books so that I can be ripped apart even more. ( )
  destinyisntfree | Feb 28, 2015 |
This is, by far, one of the hardest reviews I have had to write. I had actually won a print copy of this book in a giveaway or contest or blogging event of some sort last year, though I cannot currently remember which. I then proceeded to use my audible credit to acquire it this month. I then took the Kindle version out from a friend's public library (as she was kind enough to allow me to use her login for ebooks, since she does not use the service and my library sucks).

I read this book in about 24 hours, and my emotions are so all over the place that I fear this review will be incoherent and rambling at best, but I have to write it. I have to get the thoughts out of my head or I will not be able to sleep. This is the second night in a row that this book has kept me awake.

I both love and hate this book and the author right now. I am so thoroughly pissed at the outcome, and then also so thoroughly lost for the unanswered questions that I am left with. Much like "An Imperial Affliction" left Hazel struggling, desperate to know what happens before she dies, I have the same kind of inner turmoil over the outcome for this book.

Additionally, I thought that I would be forever changed for having seen "A Walk to Remember," and this was an even grander roller coaster ride. I feel as a soaking wet towel, wrung vigorously and left hanging in a twist over the shower curtain. I am not even sure how to put this into words properly.

John Green has taken my shriveled cynical heart and left it bleeding on the floor, utterly without a sense of why it is no longer within the confines of my ribcage. I was so invested in the characters of Gus and Hazel, and I now wonder what I will do without their story to fill my heart. Damn you, John Green! Why must you toy with my emotions so. Now I have to go read more of your books so that I can be ripped apart even more. ( )
  destinyisntfree | Feb 28, 2015 |
The pain need to be felt and that is what it feels like.Death is a phenomenon , a thing that you can never prevent and think of how it affects others ,those who love you.We all want to be remembered . You can't help it, but here is girl who want to leave as if there existed none like that.
Universe likes those who study it and it unravels its beauty for those who are willing to observe, it cares less for any individual lives. ( )
  durgaprsd04 | Feb 25, 2015 |
Turned out to be a pretty good read despite the underlying depressing theme. The story of love between two people in dire straits seemed fake to me, but the idea had a fairy-tale quality to it.

I wouldn't read it again, but it was a decent one-read book. ( )
  hazysaffron | Feb 17, 2015 |
I enjoyed this read. I picked it up to read in conjunction with my two nieces (we read together sometimes) and we all agreed that the sarcasm and angst made it great fun in spite of the heavy content. Even talked my husband into watching the movie (against his better judgment) and he really enjoyed it. ( )
  KarenKimsey | Feb 16, 2015 |
THE FAULT IN OUR STARS Review THE FAULT IN OUR STARS dismantled me. The power of its writing is nearly unmatched in my eyes. John Green expertly toyed with my emotions, offering levity in the midst of tragedy, joy where despondence grew thick. He handled cancer in a way I'd never seen before: highlighting the soul-crushing reality of imminent death with a deft prose, and stating, quite honestly, that not everyone passes from the world with their dignity. These characters laid themselves bare to me, and I openly wept at the extremity of their destruction.
 
There are two twists in this story: the first one concerning Augustus (which I saw coming), and the final one, wherein a certain someone shows up at a funeral (which I did not see coming). The book is flawlessly constructed. As I mentioned before, Green drifts from comedy to heartbreaking drama and back again in a fluid state of grace. I've read many tragedies before, but none had the impact of THE FAULT IN OUR STARS. Either an author can manage tears, or laughter. Rarely both. Nor can they offer either consistently. I know it's a cliche thing to say, but if I wasn't laughing, I was crying. Either way, Green engaged and enthralled me. 
 
This is my first taste of young adult literary fiction. I've read plenty of coming-of-age stories, but never have I read something this achingly real. Let me add this one caveat: The teenagers in this book are all rather precocious, and do not speak as one expects adolescents these days to speak. Do kids this age talk in such a way? I believe they exist, but are few and far between. To have so many well-spoken kids in one novel was, at times, hard to swallow, but the book is so hard to put down that this one minor complaint did not detract from my overall enjoyment. To clarify, I do not believe this generation of teens is stupid, but Hazel, Gus, Isaac, and even Kaitlyn (what little she's in the book) talk with the experience and intelligence of college professors. Green seemed to realize this, and decided to through in near-constant "likes" and "whatevers" to make them sound more youthful.
 
At first, Green's novel reminded me quite a bit of the Mandy Moore/Shane West movie A WALK TO REMEMBER. Had Hazel and Gus gotten married, I think it would have been borderline plagiarism, but then Green threw in the twist with Gus, and I threw all comparisons to that film out of the window.
 
Peter Van Houten was probably one of my favorite characters, as was Hazel's trip to Amsterdam, in my opinion, one of the best parts of the book. I was there, in that aged city, walking those streets, dining with Gus and Hazel, sipping bubbly, screaming at my Kindle during their encounter with the reclusive author, clapping while they kissed inside the Anne Frank Museum... I could rave on and on about those chapters, but I'd be spoiling a great deal. Just telling you when and where they kiss is a pretty big spoiler, so my apologies. I'm still not editing it out of my review, so... there!
 
Since I am new to YA, I had no idea I'd happen upon sex and cussing, but this book features both, albeit the sex was off-camera and handled respectfully. As for as language, there were more than a handful of variations of "shit" with one f-bomb toward the end, as is allowed in most PG-13 movies. Still, it was unexpected, but more than fitting. 
 
Hazel's parents were responsible for most of the tears I shed while reading. I can't even imagine how I would respond to one of my children being diagnosed with a terminal illness, but I believe it would be akin to Hazel's father's response: Crying. Lots and lots of man-bawling. That brings me to another reason I felt so much for these characters: I'm a father. My kids are my greatest accomplishment, my dearest creation. I saw my daughter in Hazel, and my son in Gus. That, in and of itself, tore me to pieces. 
 
In summation, I will not soon forget THE FAULT IN OUR STARS. Startlingly vibrant, flesh and blood people inhabit these pages. John Green manages to write about cancer victims without making them heroic, which was ballsy, to say the least. He does this by exposing their weaknesses, by allowing us to witness the ugliest parts of incurable disease. I applaud Green for tackling such horrors in a tender fashion. Especially the section where Hazel finds Gus in his car at the gas station. That took guts to write, and is a scene that will resound in my mind for years to come.
 
My highest possible recommendation.
 
WARNING: Buy a Sam's Club-size crate of Kleenex before attempting to read THE FAULT IN OUR STARS. 
 
(Also, if there are errors in this review, my apologies. I stayed up all night reading this book, and will edit with a fresh pair of eyes when I'm more... wakeful.) ( )
  Edward.Lorn | Feb 13, 2015 |
This is a great, easy read that only took me a day. I enjoyed it eventhough I found some parts a bit predictable. ( )
  DeborahCThomas | Feb 12, 2015 |
This book should seriously come with a "warning label" attached to it. You will laugh, you will smile, you will get angry but most of all you will cry. I'm talking, red eyes, nose running, don't look at me, what the hell are you looking at crying.

Two teenagers fall in love, take a trip despite their health and are let down immensely. But through it all, they have the support of their friends, their family and most importantly each other. The story does take a twist mid way and you just want to yell and say no no no no. Unfortunately no is yes and despite the outcome, things turn out to be, you know, OKAY! ( )
  salirce | Feb 11, 2015 |
I enjoyed it. Not something I'd usually read, given the subject matter, but the endless supply of snark really helped me through. ( )
  ohkamikaze | Feb 11, 2015 |
like they all said I would, I wept. ( )
  littlebirdreads | Feb 10, 2015 |
I read this as the summer reading for our school. I went into it hesitantly as I had read Finding Alaska and though I liked that book it was still hard to swallow and left me thinking about it long after the book was done. It seems that John Green has the talent to do that. Thought provoking, real, heart breaking and heart lifting. ( )
  whybehave2002 | Feb 4, 2015 |
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