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The Fault in Our Stars by John Green
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The Fault in Our Stars (original 2012; edition 2012)

by John Green

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8,468756362 (4.41)539
deadgirl's review
Death / cancer has never been so beautiful
  deadgirl | Apr 19, 2012 |
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The scene I like most in this, frankly, scene fraught book is one never seen. Of Augustus waking from his own bed, his death prophesized if not foretold, and watching Hazel struggling with her own self. Of the seedlessness of, for just one second, not bothering with himself. Alone with the world he sees only his love with her. Of the time when she could not stand, when they watched other children play. These children for whow they were the side effects they did not hold against them. They add part of humanity were with o of their sacrifice regardless of their own struggles. These tumultuous people who themselves would never leave a legacy, there may of the world like all others is fleeting survive, not focusing on oblivion. In their own metaphorical snowglobe do not see the other snowflakes melting around then, they miss the beauty gone and going ( )
  Lorem | Aug 19, 2014 |
Amazed at how much humor there was in a book about kids with cancer. Very well done. My only complaint was that these high school age students had better vocabularies than any high school, and most adults that I know. I get that they have had a lot of "down time" which has led them to do a lot of reading which I'm sure has helped but seemed out of place. ( )
  she_climber | Aug 19, 2014 |
This is not a book I would ever have chosen to read had it not been a book group choice. I approached it knowing very little about the story and liked it more than I thought I would. The story of Hazel and Augustus, teenagers living with cancer or the spectre of cancer hanging over them, they become close and share some of their precious time with each other.

It didn't make me cry, probably because it's all told in a very matter of fact sort of way by Hazel, but I did the story sad and parts of it made me think about life and how short it all is. A nice, easy to read story, with quirky and (what seemed to me) over-intelligent main characters. ( )
  nicx27 | Aug 18, 2014 |
Although this is not the kind of novel that I would usually choose to read for pleasure, I was very pleasantly surprised by it. The story with eloquent, intelligent and managed to be funny and sad in equal measure. It tackled the difficult topic of terminally ill teenagers honestly and without sugar coating, using it as a way to explore some interesting philosophical debates such as the meaning of our existence and existence of an afterlife.

Although I found the characters to be likable, my one gripe was that I never felt as though they were teenagers. Both Hazel and Augustus talk like forty year old scholars, quoting Samuel Beckett and Emily Dickinson more than they do modern pop culture. Although I still found the story to be sad, the strange intellectual way that the characters spoke distanced myself from them somewhat as it felt like it formed a barrier between me and them.

However, this gripe aside, I still very much enjoyed the story and would recommend it. I'm looking forward to reading more by this author in the future. ( )
  ArkhamReviews | Aug 17, 2014 |
What an amazing book! I laughed, I cried and I wanted to read more! The premise was about a young girl diagnosed with terminal cancer and just lived everyday to live. On one exceptional day during her support group meeting, she meets Augustus who was in remission and what happens then makes her wake up and live.

For the rest of the review, visit my blog at: http://angelofmine1974.livejournal.com/76775.html ( )
  booklover3258 | Aug 16, 2014 |
Posted first to Blog Critics as Book Review:'The Fault in our Stars' by John Green.

Cancer is such a dreadful disease, indiscriminate in its choice of victim, choosing with aplomb regardless of age, gender or status. There are a myriad of stories behind the tragedy and many of them remain untold.

In The Fault in Our Stars by John Green, he builds a story out of darkness and despair. He takes the tragedy of cancer and immerses us in the lives of characters that could very well be real. Many know of the heartaches in dealing with those who fight the fight, and many of those scars last a lifetime. He brings his story in the form of a teen girl, Hazel Lancaster. Stricken with cancer from a young age, she believes she has come to terms with what her life has become. Then she meets a young man, Augustus Waters, a survivor of cancer. He is drawn to her in a way that is initially uncomfortable, and as she tries to push him away in her sarcastic vein, he finds her to be exactly the type of girl he has been looking for. Throughout the story there is a beauty and humor, a ‘candle in the wind’ for each of those whose lives have been touched by such an uncaring disease. For cancer touches not just the victim but all those who love and are in anyway touched by them.

Be prepared for a story of romance and anger, excitement and humor, and friendship and bravery for that is the direction we are led as Green develops the personality of a group of teens that have the courage to bring both laughter and tears. The story’s that encircle each individual gives you a glimpse of the character and daring as well as the abiding hope. Hidden within that strength they also hide the depression and hopelessness as they try hard to protect their family and friends by showing only the smiles and strength whenever possible.

Written so beautifully your heart and emotions melt, you come to be a part of this group as well as their families, their triumphs and their losses. The friendships as well as the depths the families go through preparing for the worst while holding out hope is like a beacon of light.

The courage and humor, the energy and despair all keep you on a roller coaster of emotion. Green takes you on a journey both terrible and beautiful.

While a difficult book to categorize I found it to be one of the most important finds of the last few years. Green shines a light on cancer in a way that sends a tremor of intent awareness, an incandescent monument to those that have both won and lost the fight, as well as the damage done to those closest. The story blasts away the veil of secrecy and hooks you from the very beginning. ( )
  wrighton-time | Aug 11, 2014 |
I loved this book but hated that it left me a blubbering mess ( )
  Tiffy83 | Aug 11, 2014 |
This book is one you can really get into and feel a part of. It's very sad and really captivating, I couldn't put it down! 4Q5P The cover art is "okay?" "okay" (ha) and I'd recommend this to middle school and high school students as well as adults. I chose to read this book because I have read many John Green books and I really like his writing. WrenA
  edspicer | Aug 10, 2014 |
Read my full review here.

At first, I questioned the relationship between Hazel and Gus. Then I decided the relationship was deep and moving and so realistic. Their banter is fun and their love for one another is beautiful. And what they do for each other is amazing That was enough for me to get over the early reservations I had.

Did my eyes water at times? Of course. How could they not? The novel revealed much more to readers as Hazel and Augustus became more outwardly vulnerable. Green accomplished making me angry when Hazel was angry, and hurt when Hazel and Gus were both hurt. So, it succeeded in making me feel with the characters which any good novel should do.

The narrative reads more like a diary or inner monologue than anything else. Sometimes, I liked how accurate the jargon is for the characters’ ages, but other times not so much. I found that as the novel goes on, the narrative becomes much more descriptive which helped me become more immersed in the story. Another inconsistency I noticed is the way in which Hazel spoke. These conflicting speech patterns were so jarring at times. As well, sometimes each character’s voices were so similar there was barely any distinction.

Sometimes the ending of a book can be a let-down, but I have no issues with the way this novel ended. In fact, I think it was one of the most unexpectedly poignant endings.

Overall, The Fault in Our Stars is a good book. I didn’t get into the story right away, but when I did get into it, I was really into it. Did it blow me away? No. Did I like it? Yes. ( )
  CaitlinAC | Aug 10, 2014 |
I honestly hesitated to read this book, for fear it would be like Looking for Alaska, which (for me) was not a good read. However, anything I may have thought about John Green as an author was dispelled in this one. I have had cancer four times. This says just about everything I was thinking and made all the inappropriate comments I thought about making. It was sad and funny, and a lot of the comments the living made about the dead were things that people said to me WHILE I WAS ALIVE. As if I were dead. I lived that life through this book. And I cried. I don't cry. ( )
  mreed61 | Aug 10, 2014 |
I cried. Oh God. I think I have an Augustus Waters fetish myself.

I fell in love with Augustus. With "OKAY" that is bursting with sensuality. With tulips. With An Imperial Affliction. With the talking about oblivion. With all the good quotes. With every single freaking detail. I fell in love with the book.

Oh my God. My life would never be the same. Thank you John Green for this. I love you forever. ( )
  margaraawr | Aug 8, 2014 |
I cried. Oh God. I think I have an Augustus Waters fetish myself.

I fell in love with Augustus. With "OKAY" that is bursting with sensuality. With tulips. With An Imperial Affliction. With the talking about oblivion. With all the good quotes. With every single freaking detail. I fell in love with the book.

Oh my God. My life would never be the same. Thank you John Green for this. I love you forever. ( )
  margaraawr | Aug 8, 2014 |
This book is sad and lovely in equal measure. It's a 'terminal cancer' story, which these days is familiar to many families, but this story has a twist. Hazel has been living with cancer for a while and is pushed into going to a support group by her mum, who is worried that she will otherwise suffer with depression. At the support group she meets Augustus, who is a cancer susvivor and is supporting his friend Isaac. The story is about support, life, romance and death and will make you laugh one minute and cry the next. Definitely recommended! ( )
  Elainedav | Aug 8, 2014 |
John Green's The Fault in Our Stars is an inspirational book. Upon finishing it, I felt positive about life and I immediately went downstairs and threw it at my mother.

"Read this book!"
"Okay!" She cried back, "... what's it about?"
"It's about cancer, and you might find it funny, sad, happy, warm, angering, or heartbreaking, or all of them at once. You might fall in love with the characters, you might hate some characters in particular.. But you will like the ending, even though you knew it was going to end right there and then."

And so I resumed my place in bed, logged in to Goodreads, and hit 'review'...

The Fault in Our Stars doesn't end in the middle of a sentence like you think it will, but it ends with beauty and Grace. Hazel Grace. ( )
  dayall | Aug 3, 2014 |
Can't review it properly as it's a while since I've read it, but I do remember it was a book that makes you think. ( )
  hdc42 | Aug 1, 2014 |
Wow. Just Wow. I listened to the audio version read by the author. I highly recommend this book to anyone as a fantastic read! ( )
  morandia | Aug 1, 2014 |
The narrator of the audiobook for this one was fantastic. I loved her portrayal of Augustus from beginning to end. ( )
  Jaynee | Aug 1, 2014 |
It was a pretty good book.
I like the potential, and I definitely loved loved loved the actual plot and story.
However, it wasn't an incredible book.
My first issue with it was that the teenagers in the book would talk all philosophical & Shakespearean, but then go back to saying "shitty" and "it sucks." I thought that was a bit unrealistic.
My second issue with it was that the characters were underdeveloped. Although we knew somethings, for example,about August and his personality, I would learn more about him through the speeches of Hazels or Isaac at the end. However, it shouldn't be like that. We should know the characters much better earlier on. ( )
  misslovely97 | Jul 30, 2014 |
I'm probably one of the last people on the planet to read The Fault in Our Stars. It feels like that anyway.
This book is fantastic. Author John Green has a way of making these characters seem like real people and he infuses quirkiness and humor while he tells this story.

Hazel Lancaster is sixteen and has had terminal cancer for years. Augustus Waters is seventeen years old and is in remission. The two meet at a cancer support group. Also in the storyline are the teens family and friends.

When reading Young Adult, I have often found the teenage characters to be annoying and/or whiny, but that was not the case here. Hazel and Augustus are more mature than the usual YA characters, it has to do with their sickness and all that they have to go through. They view life differently than others. I really liked both of these characters.

The romance is sweet and just enough, without being too much. Green writes two people and makes them belong together. I also enjoyed that Hazel and Gus are readers, I like books that have books in them. One main aspect of the story is Hazel's trying to meet her favorite author.

This is a story about teenagers with cancer, but it is also a story about love, hope, courage and family.
I do recommend it. I found The Fault in Our Stars to be a highly readable and moving story. Very emotional, yet somehow almost light at times. The film stays true to the book and this is one of those rare cases where I enjoyed both film and novel versions pretty much equally.

"I'm in love with you, and I know that love is just a shout into the void, and that oblivion is inevitable, and that we're all doomed and that there will come a day when all our labor has been returned to dust, and I know the sun will swallow the only earth we'll ever have, and I am in love with you."
p. 153, The Fault in Our Stars by John Green

disclaimer:
This review is my honest opinion. I did not receive any type of compensation for reading and reviewing this book. While I receive free books from publishers and authors, I am under no obligation to write a positive review. I purchased my copy of The Fault in Our Stars.
http://thebookworm07.blogspot.com/2014/07/the-fault-in-our-stars-by-john-green.h... ( )
  bookworm_naida | Jul 25, 2014 |
I read Fault in Our Stars for the same reason that every other English teacher picks up a book during the school year, it is part of my students' lit circles.

And I didn't put it down until 4 hours later. Well, that's not true. I put it down so that I could teach and then again so I could drive home. I started reading it while my students were silent reading at the start of class and I was hooked.

The characters drew me in. Of course, I knew that in a few weeks my students would be reading this, so I was looking for literary devices and other elements that I could use for discussion topics.

Pretty early on I knew exactly how the book would end, but instead of being a disaster, I kept reading. I was invested with the characters. I wanted to know what happened to them. There were moments that I didn't expect and no, I won't spoil them for you.

I told my students that I definitely cried. I cried with the characters. I cried because of the characters. I just cried. The book brought out such an emotional response. Many of my students read it as their lit circle book or read it just because. They would ask me questions, we would have discussions about it.

That is the power of reading - Read book, connect to it, then connect with others about it, connect to the greater world. ( )
  tiomela | Jul 25, 2014 |
Summary: Hazel is a girl who is dying of cancer. Her mother believes she should attend support groups in order to help her feel better. In the support group, she meets a new boy named Augustus. Augustus has been cancer free, but it seems to come back when he uses his one wish to take Hazel Grace to meet Peter Vanhoughten (hazel's favorite author). The author ends up being a jerk and they leave. He informs Hazel on the last day of their trip that he is deathly ill and cancer is back. When they return, he is hospitalized after he tries to go to the store late at night and call Hazel because he is sick and his bag fell out. He ends up not surviving and at the funeral Peter shows up. Come to find out, the book he wrote was about his daughter who was just like Hazel and had cancer and passed away.
Personal experience: I loved this book. I managed to finish it in one week. It was touching to me because of how cancer has been in my family and how I was able to see there is still hope even in times like this. They still managed to live their dreams and have fun while they could.
Classroom Extensions: A vocabulary list would be great for this book. We could elaborate on the book and reflect onto what words we are unaware of and discuss the definitions and have a test over them at the end of the week.
  atinney16 | Jul 24, 2014 |
NFFTW. DFTBA. This is a journey that make you cry. So, don't read it in public if you don't want other people seeing you tearing up while turning pages.This confirmed John Green as a good storyteller. He didn't get adult on you. He could really write story from the perspective of young persons, who haven't learned to lie and say bullshit, as if that is the way to talk or to think about dying.Dying. Is something we all do. But then to try to leave a mark is in most of the persons I met.When I think of dying, I think of what is my impact. I once was young and I thought of minimizing the damage I have done to this world.Universe doesn't pay any attention to us, as individual. We are the observers of an wonderful yet uncaring universe.Go read it. Spend a few hours reading this in one setting. It is hard not to like this book. I'm glad they are making this into a movie.

Nerdfighters are the truth tellers. And John has this in mind and not telling bullshit. The honesty about dying and true love is so heart felt that you believe, even for a moment, that the characters are real, and you felt for them.That's the mark of a good book. ( )
  XOX | Jul 24, 2014 |
A lovely and unusually written book. Liked the ongoing debate between realizing the importance of an individual's place in the universe and realizing the importance of the day to day, and the emotions of your own life, which remain personally significant. Very very very sad, but also funny. Any sadder and it would have ventured into Nicholas Sparks territory. Recommended for anyone who has had a family member or close friend die. Or really anyone. The only bone I have to pick is how douchey John Green's bio was on the back flap. Did he write this or was someone else to blame? You don't put that you have "many accolades" or that your online video series is one of the "most popular of all time." Maybe that's just me. ( )
  abbeyhar | Jul 23, 2014 |
A lovely and unusually written book. Liked the ongoing debate between realizing the importance of an individual's place in the universe and realizing the importance of the day to day, and the emotions of your own life, which remain personally significant. Very very very sad, but also funny. Any sadder and it would have ventured into Nicholas Sparks territory. Recommended for anyone who has had a family member or close friend die. Or really anyone. The only bone I have to pick is how douchey John Green's bio was on the back flap. Did he write this or was someone else to blame? You don't put that you have "many accolades" or that your online video series is one of the "most popular of all time." Maybe that's just me. ( )
  abbeyhar | Jul 23, 2014 |
A lovely and unusually written book. Liked the ongoing debate between realizing the importance of an individual's place in the universe and realizing the importance of the day to day, and the emotions of your own life, which remain personally significant. Very very very sad, but also funny. Any sadder and it would have ventured into Nicholas Sparks territory. Recommended for anyone who has had a family member or close friend die. Or really anyone. The only bone I have to pick is how douchey John Green's bio was on the back flap. Did he write this or was someone else to blame? You don't put that you have "many accolades" or that your online video series is one of the "most popular of all time." Maybe that's just me. ( )
  abbeyhar | Jul 23, 2014 |
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