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The Fault in Our Stars by John Green
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The Fault in Our Stars (original 2012; edition 2012)

by John Green

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11,7091091226 (4.35)612
Death / cancer has never been so beautiful
  deadgirl | Apr 19, 2012 |
English (1,045)  Spanish (16)  Dutch (6)  German (5)  French (3)  Danish (2)  Swedish (1)  Catalan (1)  Italian (1)  Hungarian (1)  Portuguese (Brazil) (1)  All languages (1,082)
Showing 1-25 of 1045 (next | show all)
4.95 stars
This is a special book. It is not a masterpiece or a shitty book. It’s a special book.

You will laugh, you will cry, you will curse and swear, but at the end of the book you’ll realise that you liked it. A lot.

It is NOT a book about cancer. Yes, cancer is present in the story BUT that’s it.

It’s a book about love, young love and old love, love that crosses time. It’s about taking matters into your own hands, and in this case about choosing our own battles.

It changes the meaning of words as simple as ‘okay’ and it gives you an awareness of something you know and yet don’t want to know or don’t want to think about: your own mortality.

The universe is a bigger power. You don’t actually have a choice, the only choices you can change are your own. The ones you make. Are you happy with them? Read the book and think about it.

Okay?
Okay.
( )
  Joana_v_v | Feb 9, 2016 |
The Fault in Our Stars by John Green

★★★ ½

I realllly wanted to like this book more than I did. I liked it, in fact so much so that I stayed up until 5am to finish it, but I did not love it like I had hoped. Maybe it was because I had read so many hyped up reviews that I was expecting more. Or maybe it was because after dealing with the loss of my Dad through cancer 12 weeks ago and lost my son 20 weeks ago that I’m just more de-sensitized than I thought. I was warned that I would cry throughout this book and to be careful with my recent losses but it didn’t really have an effect on me (except for some descriptions that reminded me so very much of Dad). The writing actually rubbed me the wrong way in some places. I know it’s written from the view of a teenager but it was just too much for me at times. With my annoyances being said, I did enjoy the story line and I found myself invested in the characters. I obviously couldn’t put the book down as I just needed to know what was going to happen next. While it wasn’t my favorite book, I can definitely see its appeal.
( )
  UberButter | Feb 9, 2016 |
Beautiful. Poignant. Heartbreaking. Tearjerker. All of these words could be used to describe this book. I knew going into reading this book that it would be sad -- and it most definitely was. Life ends with death -- and young death is the most cruel of all.

It really and truly deserves four stars. It is a well-written story, it touched me, and I appreciated it.I appreciated it because, like people say, it's not your typical teenage love story, and it's not your typical cancer love story, either. You know the one. The one where the older, bitter manchild falls for the unfailingly optimistic, charming, and quirky cancer patient. Their love is interrupted by the revelation of her dying days, he makes a grand gesture like marrying her to make a mark on her last few moments in this life, and it is beautiful and poetic.

Aside from that, the teenager aspect. Most teenage love stories only allow for you to grow an emotional attachment to exactly two characters. The lovers. Or, in the case of a triangle story, two of the three people, because you have to pick sides, of course. Still, it's only two people. If that. Sometimes (most times), the characters of interest are so bland, such simple plot devices, that there is no reason to invest.

The Fault in Our Stars, on the other hand, has a full cast of characters. Yes, the focus is on the two who fall in love, but they're not the only people of interest. Hazel's parents, Isaac, Augustus' family, even Kaitlyn or Lidewij, and Van Houten, to some extent at least - he can at least be sympathized with in some way. They're all interesting, they're all there, they're all considered in the formulation of the story.


Quotes I loved:

-"Some infinities are bigger than other infinities."
-"I want to leave a mark. But.. The marks humans leave are too often scars"
-"I wouldn't mind, Hazel Grace. It would be a privilege to have my heart broken by you."
-"The world is not a wish-granting factory."
-"You get all these friends just when you don't need friends anymore."
-"Grief does not change you, Hazel. It reveals you."
-"That's the thing about pain," Augustus said, and then glanced back at me. "It demands to be felt"
-"I’m on a roller coaster that only goes up, my friend."
"My thoughts are stars I can't fathom into constellations." ( )
  AlexisLovesBooks | Feb 9, 2016 |
Yes, this book really is as good as they say it is. It's true to life, the characters are extremely likeable, and the love story is believable. I loved the scenes with Augustus and Hazel—their conversations were hilarious. John Green doesn't try to glorify the cancer love story trope; instead, he portrays it in a believable light and, somehow, ends the book on hope. I really liked this book. ( )
  AngelClaw | Feb 8, 2016 |
It's hard to come to this book with an open mind. I'd heard so much about it that it was always going to be difficult for it to live up to expectations. To say I enjoyed it would not be quite correct. I appreciated it, I didn't love it as much as many people seemed to, I cried. ( )
  Laurochka | Feb 6, 2016 |
Beautiful and devastating. A simple read with funny and witty dialogue (though let's be honest, teenagers do not speak like this), the tenderness of first love and the gritty realism of illness and loss. I will definitely be reading more John Green novels. ( )
  tashlyn88 | Feb 5, 2016 |
This was good. But, it was hard to read, having lost a child. ( )
1 vote lovelypenny | Feb 4, 2016 |
One of new favorite books! I cried. ( )
1 vote zuzamiller | Feb 3, 2016 |
One of new favorite books! I cried. ( )
1 vote zuzamiller | Feb 3, 2016 |
This is definitely the most hyped book by John Green, but for me, not the best. VERY sentimental (I cried a bit), not as funny or witty and the characters are just too good to be true. I like reading John Green and enjoy his style and I did enjoy this one as well, but I had my expectations very high because of all the praise and was let down a bit. A good read, nonetheless. ( )
  Iira | Feb 3, 2016 |
Narrated by Kate Rudd. This is a strong, intelligent, in-your-face story about terminal cancer. There's no pitying Hazel and Augustus. They are just fine. It's the rest of us who need to learn how to deal with their pending mortality. Rudd reads with the practical tone this story needs but she also brings warmth and humor that makes readers care for Hazel and Augustus. ( )
1 vote Salsabrarian | Feb 2, 2016 |
I'm not sure what to give this book in the end. It's heart-warming/breaking in roughly equal measure (okay, a bit more on the 'breaking' side I guess). And it really is affecting. But I couldn't help feeling like I could see the strings - the characters were a bit *too* charming, a bit *too* wise and designed to make someone like me love/mourn them. If you can just let yourself go and embrace it all then you'll be hard-pressed to find a more moving book, but I had to kind of fight my inner critic for a big chunk of it, which made it a bit harder to really fall for.

It still gets 4 stars, just because it's *so good* at doing what it does.

Update: the more distance I get from this book the more it annoys me. It's down to 3 stars - check back in a few months and see where it ends up! ( )
  mjlivi | Feb 2, 2016 |
1 vote MisaBookworm | Feb 2, 2016 |
So many feels after reading this book. Tears still streaming down my face. Augustus and Hazel are amazing. This book is amazing. I have no words. ( )
1 vote uhohxkate | Jan 31, 2016 |
the more i think about it, the more attached to this book i get. the real review i was going to write for this (i'm not sure whether i will now) had a lot to say about loss, in particular the bereavement i suffered almost exactly a year ago. there's a lot i could say, but the more i think about this book, the more i think i don't have to say it, because someone else already has. which is pretty neat, all in.

also:

“There will come a time when all of us are dead. All of us. There will come a time when there are no human beings remaining to remember that anyone ever existed or that our species ever did anything. There will be no one left to remember Aristotle or Cleopatra, let alone you. Everything that we did and built and wrote and thought and discovered will be forgotten and all of this will have been for naught. Maybe that time is coming soon and maybe it is millions of years away, but even if we survive the collapse of our sun, we will not survive forever. There was time before organisms experienced consciousness, and there will be time after. And if the inevitability of human oblivion worries you, I encourage you to ignore it. God knows that’s what everyone else does.”

and:

“The book was turned to the page with Anne Frank's name, but what got me about it was the fact that right beneath her name there were four Aron Franks. FOUR. Four Aron Franks without museums, without historical markers, without anyone to mourn them. I silently resolved to remember and pray for the four Aron Franks as long as I was around.”

and:

“I thought of my dad telling me that the universe wants to be noticed but what we want is to be noticed by the universe, to have the universe give a shit what happens to us - not the collective idea of sentient life but each of us as individuals.”

good god, hazel, you are a girl after my own heart. ( )
1 vote thebookmagpie | Jan 30, 2016 |
the more i think about it, the more attached to this book i get. the real review i was going to write for this (i'm not sure whether i will now) had a lot to say about loss, in particular the bereavement i suffered almost exactly a year ago. there's a lot i could say, but the more i think about this book, the more i think i don't have to say it, because someone else already has. which is pretty neat, all in.

also:

“There will come a time when all of us are dead. All of us. There will come a time when there are no human beings remaining to remember that anyone ever existed or that our species ever did anything. There will be no one left to remember Aristotle or Cleopatra, let alone you. Everything that we did and built and wrote and thought and discovered will be forgotten and all of this will have been for naught. Maybe that time is coming soon and maybe it is millions of years away, but even if we survive the collapse of our sun, we will not survive forever. There was time before organisms experienced consciousness, and there will be time after. And if the inevitability of human oblivion worries you, I encourage you to ignore it. God knows that’s what everyone else does.”

and:

“The book was turned to the page with Anne Frank's name, but what got me about it was the fact that right beneath her name there were four Aron Franks. FOUR. Four Aron Franks without museums, without historical markers, without anyone to mourn them. I silently resolved to remember and pray for the four Aron Franks as long as I was around.”

and:

“I thought of my dad telling me that the universe wants to be noticed but what we want is to be noticed by the universe, to have the universe give a shit what happens to us - not the collective idea of sentient life but each of us as individuals.”

good god, hazel, you are a girl after my own heart. ( )
1 vote hoegbottom | Jan 30, 2016 |
the more i think about it, the more attached to this book i get. the real review i was going to write for this (i'm not sure whether i will now) had a lot to say about loss, in particular the bereavement i suffered almost exactly a year ago. there's a lot i could say, but the more i think about this book, the more i think i don't have to say it, because someone else already has. which is pretty neat, all in.

also:

“There will come a time when all of us are dead. All of us. There will come a time when there are no human beings remaining to remember that anyone ever existed or that our species ever did anything. There will be no one left to remember Aristotle or Cleopatra, let alone you. Everything that we did and built and wrote and thought and discovered will be forgotten and all of this will have been for naught. Maybe that time is coming soon and maybe it is millions of years away, but even if we survive the collapse of our sun, we will not survive forever. There was time before organisms experienced consciousness, and there will be time after. And if the inevitability of human oblivion worries you, I encourage you to ignore it. God knows that’s what everyone else does.”

and:

“The book was turned to the page with Anne Frank's name, but what got me about it was the fact that right beneath her name there were four Aron Franks. FOUR. Four Aron Franks without museums, without historical markers, without anyone to mourn them. I silently resolved to remember and pray for the four Aron Franks as long as I was around.”

and:

“I thought of my dad telling me that the universe wants to be noticed but what we want is to be noticed by the universe, to have the universe give a shit what happens to us - not the collective idea of sentient life but each of us as individuals.”

good god, hazel, you are a girl after my own heart. ( )
1 vote hoegbottom | Jan 30, 2016 |
I really enjoyed this book! Well written, believable characters, humor, fast paced & a little sad. I loved the characters. The end was sad but very satisfying. It came highly recommended that I read this book but the warning was that it's a tear jerker. I didn't shed one tear because it was full of life and hope in spite of bad circumstances. I laughed out loud so many times! I can't wait to see the movie when it comes out. This is a must read! ( )
1 vote Erika.D | Jan 28, 2016 |
Laughed and cried. Loved it! ( )
1 vote LiteraryChanteuse | Jan 27, 2016 |
Warning: This book will reduce you to tears. With me, it was every few pages. Two terminally-ill cancer patients fall in love and hunt down a drunk author in Amsterdam. Tearful profundities ensue. Drink lots of water. ( )
1 vote dbsovereign | Jan 26, 2016 |
**May Contain Spoilers**

Hazel Grace is a fighter, she has been living with cancer for over 3 years. She keeps fighting the battle with the help of her mom and dad at her side. She doesn't let anyone in until she is forced to go to a Support Group with other kids who are sick just like her, that's where she meets Augustus Waters, a survivor of bone cancer with only one leg, and only 17.

Augustus and Hazel start hanging out almost immediately and their relationship is filled with up's and down's thanks to her sickness. However, the couple finally solidify when Augustus uses his wish on Hazel, taking her to meet the author that wrote her favorite book. It's on this trip that new things are found out and that they are in the end fighting together.

**Definitely Contains Spoilers**

I have to say that this book was good although a bit predictable in parts. The first thing that I thought was overly predictable was how they talked about Van Hauten's book ending so abruptly. I could tell that this one was going to end the same way. It was foreshadowed enough in the book to make it aware. I also predicted that Gus' cancer was going to come back. It's unfortunate that it happened but they knew that they were both going to die and had a beautiful relationship together.

**End Spoilers**

Overall, I would say that this book is acceptable to all ages, young and old. I really enjoyed this book and actually want to read more by Green as this was my first book by him. I have Looking for Alaska on the Kindle so that might get moved up in the ranks. ( )
1 vote alwelker | Jan 25, 2016 |
**May Contain Spoilers**

Hazel Grace is a fighter, she has been living with cancer for over 3 years. She keeps fighting the battle with the help of her mom and dad at her side. She doesn't let anyone in until she is forced to go to a Support Group with other kids who are sick just like her, that's where she meets Augustus Waters, a survivor of bone cancer with only one leg, and only 17.

Augustus and Hazel start hanging out almost immediately and their relationship is filled with up's and down's thanks to her sickness. However, the couple finally solidify when Augustus uses his wish on Hazel, taking her to meet the author that wrote her favorite book. It's on this trip that new things are found out and that they are in the end fighting together.

**Definitely Contains Spoilers**

I have to say that this book was good although a bit predictable in parts. The first thing that I thought was overly predictable was how they talked about Van Hauten's book ending so abruptly. I could tell that this one was going to end the same way. It was foreshadowed enough in the book to make it aware. I also predicted that Gus' cancer was going to come back. It's unfortunate that it happened but they knew that they were both going to die and had a beautiful relationship together.

**End Spoilers**

Overall, I would say that this book is acceptable to all ages, young and old. I really enjoyed this book and actually want to read more by Green as this was my first book by him. I have Looking for Alaska on the Kindle so that might get moved up in the ranks. ( )
1 vote alwelker | Jan 25, 2016 |
Well written and very poignant. ( )
  Cricket856 | Jan 25, 2016 |
Even though it made me cry, I love this book. So thought provoking and poignant. Many of my students say it is one of their favorites too. ( )
  ddbrown201 | Jan 23, 2016 |
I have yet to be unimpressed by John Green. He is an amazing talent. Even when I have hesitations about a book, he manages to create a marvelous story in the end. In the beginning I really couldn’t stand Augustus. He has a cigarette in his mouth, but doesn’t smoke it because it is a metaphor about life and death. He is always the smartest guy in the room and that kind of arrogant intellect gets on my nerves. However, Augustus and Hazel have the most unique romantic relationship I have ever read in YA and by the end of the book I was in tears with the amount of passion I feel about their relationship and the direction the story has gone. A truly impressive book about love, life, and existentialism. An engaging story, but for those who cry easy this is a tear-jerker. Thank you once again Mr. Green, for an amazing cast of characters. ( )
1 vote clockwork_serenity | Jan 23, 2016 |
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