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The Fault in Our Stars by John Green
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The Fault in Our Stars (original 2012; edition 2012)

by John Green

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8,157732384 (4.43)522
deadgirl's review
Death / cancer has never been so beautiful
  deadgirl | Apr 19, 2012 |
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NFFTW. DFTBA. This is a journey that make you cry. So, don't read it in public if you don't want other people seeing you tearing up while turning pages.This confirmed John Green as a good storyteller. He didn't get adult on you. He could really write story from the perspective of young persons, who haven't learned to lie and say bullshit, as if that is the way to talk or to think about dying.Dying. Is something we all do. But then to try to leave a mark is in most of the persons I met.When I think of dying, I think of what is my impact. I once was young and I thought of minimizing the damage I have done to this world.Universe doesn't pay any attention to us, as individual. We are the observers of an wonderful yet uncaring universe.Go read it. Spend a few hours reading this in one setting. It is hard not to like this book. I'm glad they are making this into a movie.

Nerdfighters are the truth tellers. And John has this in mind and not telling bullshit. The honesty about dying and true love is so heart felt that you believe, even for a moment, that the characters are real, and you felt for them.That's the mark of a good book. ( )
  XOX | Jul 24, 2014 |
A lovely and unusually written book. Liked the ongoing debate between realizing the importance of an individual's place in the universe and realizing the importance of the day to day, and the emotions of your own life, which remain personally significant. Very very very sad, but also funny. Any sadder and it would have ventured into Nicholas Sparks territory. Recommended for anyone who has had a family member or close friend die. Or really anyone. The only bone I have to pick is how douchey John Green's bio was on the back flap. Did he write this or was someone else to blame? You don't put that you have "many accolades" or that your online video series is one of the "most popular of all time." Maybe that's just me. ( )
  abbeyhar | Jul 23, 2014 |
A lovely and unusually written book. Liked the ongoing debate between realizing the importance of an individual's place in the universe and realizing the importance of the day to day, and the emotions of your own life, which remain personally significant. Very very very sad, but also funny. Any sadder and it would have ventured into Nicholas Sparks territory. Recommended for anyone who has had a family member or close friend die. Or really anyone. The only bone I have to pick is how douchey John Green's bio was on the back flap. Did he write this or was someone else to blame? You don't put that you have "many accolades" or that your online video series is one of the "most popular of all time." Maybe that's just me. ( )
  abbeyhar | Jul 23, 2014 |
A lovely and unusually written book. Liked the ongoing debate between realizing the importance of an individual's place in the universe and realizing the importance of the day to day, and the emotions of your own life, which remain personally significant. Very very very sad, but also funny. Any sadder and it would have ventured into Nicholas Sparks territory. Recommended for anyone who has had a family member or close friend die. Or really anyone. The only bone I have to pick is how douchey John Green's bio was on the back flap. Did he write this or was someone else to blame? You don't put that you have "many accolades" or that your online video series is one of the "most popular of all time." Maybe that's just me. ( )
  abbeyhar | Jul 23, 2014 |
This book makes people think and view life in a different perspective. Knowing that others are dying in a certain time frame makes you realize to cherish your life and appreciate it, and your loved ones, even more. 5Q5P the cover art is awesome and I'd recommend this book to middle school and high school students as well as adults. I chose to read this book because many of my friends really enjoyed it and wanted me to read it too. JoyH
  edspicer | Jul 23, 2014 |
This book is a romantic story and has some humor mixed in. It pulled me in right after the first paragraph. 4Q4P The cover art is awesome and I'd recommend this to middle school and high school students as well as adults. I chose to read this book because I heard it was a great book and I was interested in finding out what the hype was about myself. KaraH
  edspicer | Jul 23, 2014 |
I'd definitely recommend this book to ALL of my friends. It really opens you eyes and lets you see a different, and almost better, view of life. It makes you see things in a different perspective than usual and really makes you think. It's a very active book, something is always happening and it's very interesting. 5Q5P The cover art is awesome and I'd recommend this book to high school students and adults. JoyH
  edspicer | Jul 23, 2014 |
I thought this book had a really cute and honest love story. There are some amazing quotes and moments and I did cry at some parts. The one thing I would change would be to cut out Hazel's "British" friend, because she didn't really add anything to the book. The ending was a little bit dragged out and I don't really like the "wedding" bit at the end since they're like 16 and 17yrs old. Plus, they both talk way older than their age. It was a nice change to hear teens talk like that but probably not realistic. Overall, I found it a nice read. ( )
  xwhiterose08x | Jul 21, 2014 |
I didn't really enjoy this book. I bought it after hearing a lot of good things about it, and I really really wanted to love it. This story had so much potential and touched on some really heavy subjects that many authors really don't like to touch on. I'd like to say good job to Green for at least that. Done by another author I think this story could have been a masterpiece.
I really don't like the writing style in The Fault in our Stars. It comes off as pretentious and too casual, but with it, I can see why so many people really resonate with this book. It's sassy, but not where it should be.
Another thing, I really didn't resonate with the characters. I felt like they were incredibly similar (Isaac, Augustus, and Hazel); yet at the end of the novel, it's stated that they're very different, and didn't agree on a lot of things. The novel could have played more into that, and actually shown where they were disagreeing (because as far as I saw it didn't really show. Feel free to correct me). The characters to me didn't seem fully developed. I was not loving them, and, to compare to a novel I recently read (Battle Royal, Takami, 1999), characters were better characterised in a couple of pages than Hazel and Augustus were in ~300 pages.
And a common complaint I have also found that people have if they don't like the book is Green's philosophy is really shoved down your throat, and makes him seem pretentious— much of the novel revolving around showing how smart he is. It really came off the wrong way.

I really wanted to love this book. I really did, and I'm actually disappointed I did. I'd rate it lower but there were a few moments that I actually chuckled, and I actually made my way through it in its entirety in about a day. ( )
  kirsanny | Jul 21, 2014 |
I can't say how well this book portrays teenagers with cancer because I'm not one, but a friend whose niece did have cancer really liked it and said he got it right. It really felt like he did - the guilt that Hazel, the 17 year old narrator, feels about that pain her death is going to cause her parents; her parents' smothering and hovering; her wise-beyond-her-years cynical attitude.

I liked it; both Hazel and Augustus are utterly charming and dear (and yet feel realistic because Augustus reminds me of my godson) and it's a sweet story. I was glad it was more than that, too, with some twists and turns and suspense.

The one thing I didn't like, ironically, was Augustus' feelings for Hazel. To instantly fall into a crush and after what, three or four get-togethers, want to do a life-changing thing for her - it's certainly romantic, but for me that's not love. They don't even know each other well enough to really be in love. It was almost like Twilight though not as creepy because at least Hazel is smart and interesting in ways Bella can only dream of. But at this point in the story, Augustus doesn't even know her well enough to know how smart, etc., she is.

I think you have to know somebody for a while and see them at their worst - these two don't even have any fights, for god's sake. Maybe this is a YA convention I'm not used to. Hazel's doubts and slow realization of her feelings felt more right. So the ending wasn't the glorious climax for me that I suppose it was for other people. That's okay, I found plenty to like. But I don't think I'll bother re-reading this. ( )
  piemouth | Jul 18, 2014 |
I really enjoyed reading the story of Hazel Grace and Augustus Waters. It was witty, honest and heart wrenching all at the same time. I believe that if you enjoyed the book, A Walk To Remember, this may be a book for you! It was difficult reading about 2 teenagers living with cancer, but the emotions felt real, along with the desire to live and enjoy life and experience love.

What was difficult for me personally, was the book portrayed these wonderful kids, who were experiencing life and death, but really did not have the peace that a relationship with God can provide or the comfort that their lives had more meaning then the time that they would spend here on earth.
  Kim327 | Jul 18, 2014 |
I really liked this book, but I think people are blowing it up way too much now. It's a cute love story and all, but it's not the greatest book I've ever read. It was a very predictable book except for a couple of parts that surprised me. ( )
1 vote hockeyzc58 | Jul 16, 2014 |
I did not care for this book. I had seen the hype on various social networks and decided to read it. The only reason I didn't give this one star is because of an original plot. The dialogue felt disingenuous and it was difficult to read without rolling my eyes every five pages. I have a large vocabulary, but I don't spout superfluous jargon without proper context. I didn't cry, like I was promised, because this book was a pretentious collection of pages. I will give John Green props because I couldn't put the book down. I'll still watch the movie, but I was not enchanted like the majority of teen girls everywhere. ( )
  aliterarylion | Jul 14, 2014 |
After I had breezed through this novel I asked myself "Have I just read a slappy happy story about terminally ill cancer patients or is there something more": after all the cancer background seemed convincing and I thought that the character of Hazel Grace: who tells the story in the first person was well drawn. Well let us be clear about one thing: this is first and foremost a romantic comedy, written in the best Hollywood tradition, nothing gets in the way of the central love story, not even terminal cancer. It is aimed at a youth market, many of whom will know just what to expect from the many films that are aimed to tug at the heart strings, but be witty and entertaining at the same time. Never mind the improbable situations (there are far too many in this book) because we are in fantasy land.

The trick for John Green was to write a novel about star-crossed lovers which still had enough feel good factor to make it a popular read. Teminally ill cancer patients would seem to be quite a challenge, but not really if you are clear from the start that they are going to die, but before they do, they will experience that most wonderful thing "true love". Augustus Waters is the perfect tragic hero, a teenage hunk (ex basket ball player) who always says the right thing and has a confidence and savoir faire far beyond his 17 years of age. He is hot and he thinks Hazel Grace is hot too, so that's alright then. These are white middle class adolescents, with loving parents and enough money to go jaunting off to Europe. They expect to get the best treatment and are not disappointed.

I can't really comment on the levels of erudition in the conversation of the young people, but suspect it is massively over-egged. Green tries to impart some wisdom about living, or in the case of Hazel and Augustus living with a terminal illness and comes up with a couple of nice sounding metaphors that would appeal to the movie crowd. I suppose it's in his favour that he never had me reaching for the sick-bucket and kept me reasonably entertained for the most part, but there is nothing more to this book than what is needed to create a best seller. This book was chosen by my book club and as I suspected, it is a frothy, light and above all safe read. 2.5 stars. ( )
2 vote baswood | Jul 14, 2014 |
Be forewarned, this is not a 'happy' read; it's about kids with cancer. Reading this reminded me of Zach Sobiech, the composer of the song 'Clouds', who succumbed to osteosarcoma earlier this year -- who before that, strove to make his mark in the short time he had left. It's about kids who battle the disease, of how they try to live as normal lives as possible, their fears and insecurities, and mostly importantly, their dreams and hopes. ( )
  MomsterBookworm | Jul 14, 2014 |
Never did I think a novel about teenagers fighting cancer would be so heartbreaking and uplifting at the same time. Hazel and Augustus are two characters who focus on living, not dying. They will remain with you long after you finish The Fault in Our Stars. I highly recommend this book. ( )
  JoStARs | Jul 14, 2014 |
4
  aweinel | Jul 14, 2014 |
This book was so great. I couldn't put it down. I read it in two days, in laughter, a smile on my face, and tears streaming down my face at the turn of a page. So well written, with beautiful prose. But ended abruptly, leaving you wanting more. ( )
  booksandbutter | Jul 14, 2014 |
Booklist starred (January 1, 2012); Horn Book starred (Fall 2012); Kirkus Review starred (January 15, 2012)
  stonini | Jul 13, 2014 |
One of the very few books that left a Mark on my Heart. I can read and re-read the book all day without ever getting bored.
The story is very Heart-Touching and the characters are Amazing. Some characters seemed somewhat familiar, perhaps because i know some people who are more alive than others and who always want good for others.
Hazel Grace, knowing what she is and trying to minimize the after-effects of her death, this is so brave, even for a fiction character. And then there is Mr. Augustus, i would really want to have persons like him as Friends. BEST CHARACTERS one can ever have in a perfect story; BEST PARENTS, BEST FRIENDS, BEST STRANGERS,....
All i can say is that this is the best Romantic Novel i have ever read. It felt more like "A Walk to Remember" by Nicholas Sparks.
Thank you John Green for such a wonderful journey. God Bless U. ( )
  SahilQaiser | Jul 12, 2014 |
This book is different from the books I have read. It is one of a kind in which you will laugh, cry and smile. However, it will leave you heart broken but happy. ( )
  hersheymai | Jul 11, 2014 |
This book is one of my favorites. I read it more than once, and there are dozens of highlighted lines in my copy. John Green's writing style is interesting to me. I am able to relate to the things he says and the way he says them. I would definitely recommend this book! ( )
  nfoto | Jul 9, 2014 |
I read this in 2 Days.
That is a feat of nature, considering it takes me a week to read a regular 200 page book.
This book is just unexplainably AWESOME.
This author is just unexplainably AWESOME. ( )
  brickhouse7 | Jul 8, 2014 |
The four stars says it all--I really, really liked it. It was very humorous, even though one of the main themes is death (this is not a spoiler--it's in the blurb on the jacket!) The characters are very likeable, and I really enjoyed his writing style. He examines death in all its forms, from the glorification of the heroic death in battle down to the pathos of the demeaning aspects of death as it inexorably drains every drop of dignity and self-reliance from its victim as it advances. Even with a such a sober subject, his approach is quirky. I will continue to read John Green's novels--Paper Towns is next on the list!


P.S. I just finished reading the reviews on Amazon, and want to address a couple of things. Some people complained that the relationship is too contrived, too Bella Swan-esque--I saw, therefore I loved--which is a valid criticism. The relationship does happen immediately and inexplicably. I agree also with the character buy-in. While I like the characters, I don't feel any personal connection to them. At the **spoiler alert** tragic event and at the end of the book, I feel no desire to weep--but even though I guess this means they never become real for me, I still like them. As for the pretentious dialogue--I have met a very few teenagers who would be capable of this type of speech, but they are rare birds. I am an unabashed fan of witty dialogue that incorporates words that are seldom heard in everyday speech--I say Go John Green! If you know the word and use it correctly, why shouldn't you say it? If you use a four syllable word instead of a two syllable word because the four syllable one popped into your head first and it works, that doesn't make you pretentious. Consciously searching for a four syllable instead of a two syllable does, but then what does the reverse make you? Why should you have to stop and mentally search for the two syllable when you already have the four syllable? So, no, I didn't find the dialogue pretentious! ( )
  darcy36 | Jul 8, 2014 |
A beautifully written and captivating novel, The Fault in Our Stars is the type of book you will simultaneously want to rush toward the conclusion yet will also want to savor. The story compels you toward the end, while the language asks you to resist the urge to rush through, but instead take the time to enjoy each moment with the characters, good and bad. 17-year-old Hazel doesn’t get to live like a normal teenager. In fact, she doesn’t know how long she has to live period. Pulled out of school after her diagnosis with terminal cancer, Hazel spends most of her days battling illness and attending support group. Until Augustus Waters joins a support session and gives her an additional something to fight for. As they fall in love with each other, so does the reader fall in love with them both. A reminder that all in this world is temporary, the beauty of the story is also a reminder to live life as wholly and as honestly as you can until the very end. ( )
  MCHBurke | Jul 7, 2014 |
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