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Beyond the Limits of Thought by Graham…
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Beyond the Limits of Thought

by Graham Priest

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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0199244219, Paperback)

This second and extended edition of Priest's classic includes new chapters on Heidegger and Nagarjuna, as well as reflections on reactions to the first edition.
Praise for previous edition: "a splendid tour de force, one which should be read by every philosopher..."--Philosophical Quarterly
"[H]ighly entertaining and provocative...an engaging and instructive tour through some of the most perplexing features of our own conceptual finitude..."--TLS

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:19:44 -0400)

(see all 2 descriptions)

Graham Priest presents a new, expanded edition of his highly original exploration of the nature and limits of thought. Drawing on recent developments in the field of logic, Priest shows that the description of such limits leads to contradiction, and argues that these contradictions are in fact true. Beginning with an analysis of the way in which these limits arise in pre-Kantian philosophy, Priest goes on to illustrate how the nature of these limits was theorized by Kant and Hegel. He offers new interpretations of Berkeley's master argument for idealism and Kant on the antinomies. He explores the paradoxes of self-reference, and provides a unified account of the structure of such paradoxes. The book goes on to trace the theme of the limits of thought in modern philosophy of language, including discussions of the ideas of Wittgenstein and Derrida. The second edition includes new chapters on Heidegger and Nagarjuna, as well as reflections on reactions to the first edition. This clear, provocative, and systematic work offers a radically different approach to philosophy and logic.… (more)

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