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The Mayors: The Chicago Political Tradition…
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The Mayors: The Chicago Political Tradition

by Paul Michael Green

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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0809319616, Paperback)

This revised edition includes an afterword by Paul M. Green, new chapters scrutinizing the administrations of Richard J. Daley and Eugene Sawyer, and a fresh look at the mayoralties of Richard J. Daley, first elected in 1955, and his son, Richard M. Daley, who took over the job from Eugene Sawyer in 1989. Green and Holli also include a historical poll that ranks from first to last mayors who have served Chicago since 1837 through Harold Washington. A timely concluding chapter by Melvin G. Holli considers the question of whether the mayor’s office of Chicago is a stepping-stone to higher political office.

The earliest mayor considered is Joseph Medill, who, as Chicago’s first modern mayor, guided the city in its rise from the ashes of the Great Fire of 1871. Also included are essays about the most recent and perhaps most controversial mayors: Michael A. Bilandic, Jane M. Byrne, and Harold Washington. Just as intriguing but less well known are Edward F. Dunne, a reformer and reputed radical who had "long-haired friends" and "short-haired women" in his administration; the politically reticent Fred A. Busse; Big Bill Thompson, a buffoon whose departure from office was much rued by Al Capone; William E. Dever, an "honorable man" who was "soundly defeated by a loudmouthed lout [Thompson] who barely avoided imprisonment"; Anton J. Cermak, smart, tough, a winner stopped only by an assassin’s bullet; Edward J. Kelly, who balanced scandal and accomplishment to reign for fourteen years; and Martin H. Kennelly, a nice guy, honest, dignified, inept.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:04:32 -0400)

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