HomeGroupsTalkZeitgeist
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

The House I Loved by Tatiana de Rosnay
Loading...

The House I Loved (original 2011; edition 2012)

by Tatiana de Rosnay

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
4263424,790 (3.18)17
Member:TessaSlingerland
Title:The House I Loved
Authors:Tatiana de Rosnay
Info:Pan Books
Collections:Read in 2012, Read but unowned, Engelstalig
Rating:***
Tags:Paris, Haussmann, destruction, love, 258 p

Work details

The House I Loved by Tatiana de Rosnay (2011)

None.

Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 17 mentions

English (27)  Dutch (5)  French (1)  Swedish (1)  All languages (34)
Showing 1-5 of 27 (next | show all)
Prachtig verhaal, maar een boek dat mij jammer genoeg nooit echt raakte. Misschien omdat ik het geluisterd heb ipv gelezen?
( )
  pieterserrien | Aug 16, 2014 |
Very sad ( )
  Harrod | Jun 25, 2014 |
I am surprised at how much I hated this book because I loved "Sarah's Key". The fact that it took me three moths to read it should have been enough to get me to stop but when I start a book I finish it.The book is about a widow named Rose Bazelet who fights until the end to save her house from destruction during the renovation of Paris, France in 1860's. ( )
  LizPhoto | Mar 5, 2014 |
Tatiana De Rosnay has come to be known for her ability to take an emotional event (or many) and put it down on paper. Her novels will make you cry, cheer and laugh out loud and "The House I Loved" is no different.

When Widow Rose Bazelet is informed that her house will be torn down to make way for Baron Haussmann's wide boulevards, she can't imagine a life anywhere else. In the time from when she is informed of the impending destruction to the evacuation of her street, Rose sits down in her house and writes about why she loves her home so much.

Rosnay, has taken another moment in Parisian history that many of us know nothing about and has given it a face and a voice. Each page tells us more about the lives lived within the stone and plaster walls and of how something can be come the most important thing to us. ( )
  JEB5 | Oct 30, 2013 |
Rose Bazelet, mother and widower, is a Parisienne through and through and the house she loves lies in the shadow of the Église Saint Germain. De Rosnay’s story is the sad tale of the destruction of her family home, steeped in memories of her children and deceased husband Armand, with whom she corresponds throughout the book. As Baron Haussmann reshapes the city, paying citizens to leave their homes, Rose shifts backwards and forwards in time and we revisit both delightful and tragic moments in her past; the dramatic and soon to be forgotten history of the rue Childebert.

Had I seen the ‘chick-lit’ style US cover to this novel that I feel more accurately reflects the tone of De Rosnay’s writing rather than the British publication, to be perfectly honest, I would probably not have picked this up. There is absolutely nothing wrong with the very lightest of fiction, however I simply don’t get that much from it. Although I confess that prior to reading The House I Loved I wasn’t familiar Tatiana de Rosnay’s other writing (although I know Sarah’s Key has been a huge success), this book, although holding glimmers of substance in some of the peripheral characters and story lines, just felt a little predictable and overly sentimental for my tastes. Flowers, books, letters, yawn.

Although the entertainment factor is ever-present and I would probably have lapped this up whilst sat on a sun lounger somewhere, I’m not on holiday and had the book not been set in Paris I really wouldn’t have given a fig. Having said that, aside from the constant referrals to that evil ‘Haussmann’ (a large degree of artistic license being used here rather than historical fact I suspect…) this book could have been set in any time in any place. Although I’ve just bought my first house myself and could therefore sympathise with the importance of the home and the memories you hold within it, particularly of those who aren’t with us any more, Rose just lay it on a little thick and, although I perhaps had some unfair expectations from the start, the story left me feeling a little bored and unconvinced.

http://relishreads.com/2013/07/16/the-house-i-loved/ ( )
  Lucy_Rock | Jul 16, 2013 |
Showing 1-5 of 27 (next | show all)
. . . one gets the clear sense of a woman losing her place in a changing world, but this isn’t enough to make up for a weak narrative hung entirely on the eventual reveal of a long-buried secret.
added by Nickelini | editPublishers Weekly (Dec 12, 2012)
 
Can a novel make us nostalgic for a place we’ve never been? With her third English-language release, an uncomplicated story brimming with homespun details, Tatiana de Rosnay presents a convincing case. Nearly every sentence evokes the appeal of mid-19th-century Paris, the city she clearly loves, and her empathy for the citizens whose homes and dreams were obliterated by the march of progress.
 
De Rosnay’s delicacy and the flavor of her beloved Paris are everywhere in this brief but memorable book.

Replete with treats, particularly for Paris-lovers—indeed for anyone wedded to a special place.
added by Nickelini | editKirkus Reviews (Dec 29, 2011)
 
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Series (with order)
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Paris slashed with saber cuts, its veins opened.

--Émile Zola, The Kill, 1871
The old Paris is no more (the shape of a city changes faster, alas! than the human heart).

--Charles Baudelaire, "The Swan," 1861
I wish for all this to be marked on my body when I am dead. I believe in such cartography -- to be marked by nature, not just to label ourselves on a map like the names of rich men and women on buildings.

--Michael Ondaatje, The English Patient
Dedication
This is for my mother, Stella,

and for my House Man: NJ
First words
My beloved, I can hear them coming up our street.
Quotations
Last words
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Publisher series
Original language

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English

None

Book description
Paris, France: 1860’s. Hundreds of houses are being razed, whole neighborhoods reduced to ashes. By order of Emperor Napoleon III, Baron Haussman has set into motion a series of large-scale renovations that will permanently alter the face of old Paris, moulding it into a “modern city.” The reforms will erase generations of history—but in the midst of the tumult, one woman will take a stand.

Rose Bazelet is determined to fight against the destruction of her family home until the very end; as others flee, she stakes her claim in the basement of the old house on rue Childebert, ignoring the sounds of change that come closer and closer each day. Attempting to overcome the loneliness of her daily life, she begins to write letters to Armand, her beloved late husband. And as she delves into the ritual of remembering, Rose is forced to come to terms with a secret that has been buried deep in her heart for thirty years. Tatiana de Rosnay's The House I Loved is both a poignant story of one woman’s indelible strength, and an ode to Paris, where houses harbor the joys and sorrows of their inhabitants, and secrets endure in the very walls...
Haiku summary

No descriptions found.

"Paris, France: 1860's. Hundreds of houses are being razed, whole neighborhoods reduced to ashes. By order of Emperor Napoleon III, Baron Haussman has set into motion a series of large-scale renovations that will permanently alter the face of old Paris, moulding it into a modern city. The reforms will erase generations of history-but in the midst of the tumult, one woman will take a stand. Rose Bazelet is determined to fight against the destruction of her family home until the very end; as others flee, she stakes her claim in the basement of the old house on rue Childebert, ignoring the sounds of change that come closer and closer each day. Attempting to overcome the loneliness of her daily life, she begins to write letters to Armand, her beloved late husband. And as she delves into the ritual of remembering, Rose is forced to come to terms with a secret that has been buried deep in her heart for thirty years. The House I Loved is both a poignant story of one woman's indelible strength, and an ode to Paris, where houses harbor the joys and sorrows of their inhabitants, and secrets endure in the very walls"-- Cover verso.… (more)

(summary from another edition)

» see all 6 descriptions

LibraryThing Author

Tatiana de Rosnay is a LibraryThing Author, an author who lists their personal library on LibraryThing.

profile page | author page

Quick Links

Swap Ebooks Audio
1 avail.
479 wanted
6 pay4 pay

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (3.18)
0.5
1 3
1.5 1
2 27
2.5 9
3 45
3.5 15
4 31
4.5 3
5 11

 

Help/FAQs | About | Privacy/Terms | Blog | Contact | LibraryThing.com | APIs | WikiThing | Common Knowledge | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | 92,742,533 books! | Top bar: Always visible