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The Borgias: Two Novels in One Volume by…
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The Borgias: Two Novels in One Volume (edition 2011)

by Jean Plaidy

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673265,269 (3.27)1
Member:paixe
Title:The Borgias: Two Novels in One Volume
Authors:Jean Plaidy
Info:Broadway (2011), Paperback, 672 pages
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The Borgias: Madonna on the Seven Hills / Light on Lucrezia by Jean Plaidy

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I read the first book. I found it flat and not very exciting. Due to my dissatisfaction with book one, I didn't bother moving on to book two. I'd rather find something more worthy of my time.
I generally love books deeply rooted in European or Early American history. Jean Plaidy is said to be a very good author, but I'm just not a fan of her work. Perhaps it will suit you, but I'm going to stick with Phillippa Gregory! ( )
  caslater83 | Jun 2, 2019 |
Interesting book. It took quite a while to read and I did leave it aside at times to read other books. Glad I finished it. It showed Lucretia Borgia in a totally different light to what is normally written of her. One thinks of her as evil whereas in this book she is definitely not. In fact pity is the emotion felt for her when reading this book. ( )
  scot2 | Apr 28, 2016 |
I admittedly don't know much about the Borgias other than what is common knowledge so this book was really interesting to me. It was mostly about Lucrezia, but told from several points of view so you get more of a picture of what's going on than just from her perspective. I loved that even from when they were children you got the sense that Cesare was going to be just a terrible terrible person. What I found most fascinating was how Plaidy chose to paint Lucrezia in such an innocent light. She was for the most part wholly unaware of any wrong doing on the part of The Pope and her brothers. By the time she realized what was really going on she knew that she was too far gone to do much else than keep loving her family and hope for the best.

I'm not sure what I thought of this second book on Lucrezia Borgia. To me it almost seemed like the second part of a trilogy rather than the end of a 2 part set, nothing went right for any of the people you wanted it to and everything wen right for their enemies. I couldn't help but think I would have liked the book a whole lot better if there had been a little more happy endings than cold hard facts. Or maybe I was just looking for something happy to happen for poor Lucrezia.

Over all it wasn't bad, and maybe in time I'll find that I really liked it, but for now the best I can give it is 3 stars. ( )
  RockStarNinja | Jan 19, 2012 |
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Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Plaidy, Jeanprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Rheenen, Jan vansecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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It was cold in the castle, and the woman who stood at the window looking from the snowy caps of the mountains to the monastery below thought longingly of the comfort of her house on the Piazza Pizzo di Merlo sixty miles away in Rome. (Madonna of the Seven Hills)
At the head of the cavalcade which was traveling northward from Naples to Rome, rode an uneasy young man of seventeen. (Light on Lucrezia)
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
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Jean Plaidy - pen name of English author Eleanor Hibbert, also known as Victoria Holt.
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0307956865, Paperback)

For the first time in one volume, Jean Plaidy’s duet of Borgia novels brings to life the infamous, reckless, and passionate family in an unforgettable historical saga.

Madonna of the Seven Hills:
 
Fifteenth-century Rome: the Borgia family is on the rise. Lucrezia’s father is named Pope Alexander VI, and he places his daughter and her brothers Cesare, Giovanni, and Goffredo in the jeweled splendor—and scandal—of his court. From the Pope’s affairs with adolescent girls, to Cesare’s dangerous jealousy of anyone who inspires Lucrezia’s affections, to the ominous birth of a child conceived in secret, no Borgia can elude infamy.

Light on Lucrezia:

 
Some said she was an elegant seductress. Others swore she was an incestuous murderess. She was the most dangerous and sought after woman in all of Rome. Lucrezia Borgia’s young life has been colored by violence and betrayal. Now, married for the second time at just eighteen she hopes for happiness with her handsome husband Alfonso. But faced with brutal murder, she's soon torn between her love for her husband and her devotion to her brother Cesare… And in the days when the Borgias ruled Italy, no one was safe from the long arm of their power. Not even Lucrezia.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:21:31 -0400)

For the first time in one volume, Jean Plaidy's duet of Borgia novels brings to life the infamous, reckless, and passionate family in an unforgettable historical saga. Madonna of the Seven Hills: Fifteenth-century Rome: the Borgia family is on the rise. Lucrezia's father is named Pope Alexander VI, and he places his daughter and her brothers Cesare, Giovanni, and Goffredo in the jeweled splendor-and scandal-of his court. From the Pope's affairs with adolescent girls, to Cesare's dangerous jealousy of anyone who inspires Lucrezia's affections, to the ominous birth of a child conceived in secret, no Borgia can elude infamy. Light on Lucrezia: Some said she was an elegant seductress. Others swore she was an incestuous murderess. She was the most dangerous and sought after woman in all of Rome. Lucrezia Borgia's young life has been colored by violence and betrayal. Now, married for the second time at just eighteen she hopes for happiness with her handsome husband Alfonso. But faced with brutal murder, she's soon torn between her love for her husband and her devotion to her brother Cesare. And in the days when the Borgias ruled Italy, no one was safe from the long arm of their power. Not even Lucrezia.… (more)

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