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Common Sense and the Crisis by Thomas Paine

Common Sense and the Crisis (edition 1960)

by Thomas Paine

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Title:Common Sense and the Crisis
Authors:Thomas Paine
Info:Doubleday & Co. (1960), Paperback
Collections:Your library
Tags:Political Theory

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Common Sense and the Crisis by Thomas Paine



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Reading Thomas Paine gives you some insight into what it felt like to live through the pre-revolutionary period and revolutionary war in America, and why Great Britain's legislation was interpreted the way it was. He gives a lot of weight to America's moral purity, as opposed to Great Britain's, and also spends some pages on the folly of a land war in an occupied country, as well as the state of currency and finance in the confederacy of states. He is hopeful from the outset, even when battles are not being won, and his optimism and devotion to the idea of republican independence are contagious.

Paine didn't spend much time in the colonies before hostilities broke out, and that may have added to his anti-colonial zeal or not. It's helpful, while reading this, to have a battle timeline handy since the original Crises were often written in response to military and diplomatic events. ( )
  bexaplex | Jan 4, 2009 |
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Of more worth is one honest man to society and in the sight of God, than all the crowned ruffians that ever lived. [Common Sense]
Expedience and right are different things. [Common Sense]
These are the times that try men's souls... [Crisis I]
When a man pays a tax, he knows the public necessity requires it, and therefore feels a pride in discharging his duty... [Crisis X]
There is nothing sets the character of a nation in a higher or lower light with others, than the faithfully fulfilling, or perfidiously breaking of treaties. [Crisis XI]
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