HomeGroupsTalkZeitgeist
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

The World We Found: A Novel by Thrity…
Loading...

The World We Found: A Novel (original 2012; edition 2012)

by Thrity Umrigar

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
2322349,816 (3.94)11
Member:harrietgate
Title:The World We Found: A Novel
Authors:Thrity Umrigar
Info:Harper (2012), Hardcover, 320 pages
Collections:Your library
Rating:*****
Tags:Read

Work details

The World We Found by Thrity Umrigar (2012)

None.

Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 11 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 23 (next | show all)
I have such mixed feelings about this one. On the plus side, it was well written, and the characters (for the most part) seemed real to me. I cared about their problems and wanted to see them resolved with the least harm done. But, that's not what happened. Oh, the "central" problem was resolved, but it was the peripheral problems that really worried me. For instance, one character, a wealthy Parsi man, used the promise of a contract for electrical supplies to get a poor Muslim man (a long lost friend from college) to come have lunch with him. He was trying to convince the Muslim to change his mind about allowing his wife to travel to America. The attempt was unsuccessful, so the Parsi walked away from the electrical shop and never thought of it again. There's no indication that he followed through on his promise of a contract -- a contract that would have substantially affected the finances of the Muslim family without being charity. It was the casualness with which this wealthy man, himself a member of a "model minority" within India, blew off his offer of doing business when he didn't get what he wanted that bothered me. It made me unable to view the character in a good light for the rest of the story. Maybe that was deliberate on the author's part, making him so morally ambiguous. If so, she it was really well done! I ended up feeling that the ensemble cast, with the exception of Kavita and Mumtaz, were a bunch of really charming people that I didn't like.

After reading some other reviews (bad reviews, which are generally more informative than good ones - like Tolsoy's families, good reviews are uniformly bland, but bad reviews are much more interesting) and have second thoughts. I'm willing to concede that this book might deserve more stars than I gave it. The question turns on whether or not the author made the Laleh and Adish characters, in particular, so morally ambiguous deliberately, or whether they are simply a reflection of her own internalised sense of entitlement. Because that, I realise, is the heart of my discomfort with the novel. These are such likeable people! I'm sure they're lovely neighbors, and would be fun at a dinner party, great hosts and delightful guests...but they're rotten at the center.

Maybe the title is the key. Though they started out as revolutionaries, out to change the world, in the end, they've all defaulted to the world as they found it. Instead of changing the world, the world changed them.

God, that's depressing. ( )
  duende | Feb 6, 2014 |
Once I began reading, I didn't want to put it down. ( )
  alexandriaginni | Apr 3, 2013 |
Excellent book. Not her best. However, it seemed slightly unfinished to me. Needed a better "ending". ( )
  shazjhb | Dec 23, 2012 |
Story of four women from India and the unbrakable ties they share. Based on a planned reunion with one of the four who is in America with terminal cancer.Four different women with different present but a shared past from school days. Having similiar type of friends, it was nice to read . It affirms for me how lucky I am to have these ladies in my life although distance seperates us too. ( )
  Smits | Nov 11, 2012 |
Armaiti is living in America with her daughter and husband when she is diagnosed with terminal cancer. Immediately her thoughts return to her three best friends from thirty years before: Laleh, Kavita and Nishta – all who still live in India. In the turbulent 1970′s the four young women had challenged the status quo and fought for women’s rights. Now they are older and each has taken a different path in life, far from their revolutionary days and each other. Laleh harbors guilt and regret, Kavita hides who she really is from those closest to her, Armaiti struggles to let go on her own terms, and Nishta finds herself in a self-imposed prison of radical fundamentalism.

Thrity Umrigar’s novel of women’s friendship and the challenges facing women in India unwinds in the multiple viewpoints of each of the four main characters. The nonlinear narrative revisits the past through flashback memories, and reveals the deep roots of friendship and love.

I found myself especially captivated by Nishta’s story. Nishta has abandoned her Hindu religion to marry a Muslim. Blinded by love, she could not have anticipated her husband’s slide into radical fundamentalism which would leave her cloaked behind a burkha, enslaved to her mother-in-law, and unable to express her individuality. When Kavita and Laleh re-enter her life, Nishta is reminded of all she has sacrificed and she begins dream of a different future, one without her husband.

Nishta’s throat ached with sorrow. Despite all that had happened between them, she loved the man sleeping next to her. Felt protective of him. Because despite the sober attire and attitude, his humorless demeanor, the bearded visage, the religious garb, the twinkle-eyed college boy he had once been occasionally shone through. – from The World We Found, page 220 -

Umrigar’s writing sparkles with the lives of her protagonists. She dives beneath the surface to examine the characters’ search for truth and redemption and reveals the difficulties faced when individuals seek their own path in the face of entrenched religious, cultural and familial expectations. Umrigar reminds us that for every decision, for every path we choose, there are consequences both good and bad.

I read this beautiful novel in record time, and was sorry to say good bye to its characters. Readers who love women’s fiction and novels about love and friendship will be well served to pick up a copy of The World We Found.

Highly recommended. ( )
  writestuff | Aug 29, 2012 |
Showing 1-5 of 23 (next | show all)
From the first sentence of this insightful novel, Umrigar (The Space Between Us; The Weight of Heaven) will enthrall readers with her deft portrayal of the depth of women's friendships, the many facets of love, and the oh-so-human conundrum--whether to live with one's choices or walk away. Oprah would love this book, and so will your patrons. Buy multiples.
added by Christa_Josh | editLibrary Journal, Sally Bissell (Oct 15, 2011)
 
Umrigar handles these important themes with expertise and without judgment. A storyteller through and through, she ensures that her characters face up to the costs and consequences created by their choices, right or wrong, principled or unprincipled. As Laleh observes: “I’m saying that it all matters. Everything matters. Our virtues and our sins.”
 
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Series (with order)
Canonical title
Original title
Information from the Norwegian Common Knowledge. Edit to localize it to the English one.
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
The tooth broke three days after she recieved the awful news.
Quotations
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Publisher series
Original language

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English

None

Book description
University students in late 1970's Bombay, Armaiti, Laleh, Kavita, and Nishta were inseparable. Spirited and unconventional, they challenged authority and fought for a better world. But much has changed in the thirty years since those heady days. Following different paths, the quartet has drifted apart, and the day-to-day demands of work and family have tempered the revolutionary fervor they shared. Then comes devastating news: Armaiti, who moved to America, is dying and wants to see the old friends she left behind. For Laleh, reunion is a bittersweet reminder of unfulfilled dreams and unspoken guilt. For Kavita, it is an admission of forbidden passion. For Nishta, it is the end of self-delusion and the promise of freedom from a bitter fundamentalist husband. As for Armaiti, it is an act of acceptance, of letting go on her own terms even if her ex-huband and daughter do not understand her choices. In the course of their journey to reconnect, Armaiti, Laleh, Kavita, and Nishta must confront the truths of their lives - acknowledge long-held regrets, face painful secrets and hidden desires, and reconcile their idealistic past and their compromised present. And they will have to decide what matters most - a choice that just may help them reclaim the extraordinary world they once found. Exploring the enduring bonds of friendship and the power of love to change lives, and offering an indelible portrait of modern India - a nation struggling to bridge economic, religious, gender, and generational divides - "The World We Found" is a dazzling masterwork from the remarkable Thrity Umrigar.
Haiku summary

Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0061938343, Hardcover)

The acclaimed author of The Space Between Us and The Weight of Heaven returns with a breathtaking, skillfully wrought story of four women and the unbreakable ties they share.

As university students in late 1970s Bombay, Armaiti, Laleh, Kavita, and Nishta were inseparable. Spirited and unconventional, they challenged authority and fought for a better world. But much has changed over the past thirty years. Following different paths, the quartet drifted apart, the day-to-day demands of work and family tempering the revolutionary fervor they once shared.

Then comes devastating news: Armaiti, who moved to America, is gravely ill and wants to see the old friends she left behind. For Laleh, reunion is a bittersweet reminder of unfulfilled dreams and unspoken guilt. For Kavita, it is an admission of forbidden passion. For Nishta, it is the promise of freedom from a bitter fundamentalist husband. And for Armaiti, it is an act of acceptance, of letting go on her own terms even if her ex-husband and daughter do not understand her choices.

In the course of their journey to reconnect, Armaiti, Laleh, Kavita, and Nishta must confront the truths of their lives—acknowledge long-held regrets, face painful secrets and hidden desires, and reconcile their idealistic past and their compromised present. And they will have to decide what matters most, a choice that may just help them reclaim the extraordinary world they once found.

Exploring the enduring bonds of friendship and the power of love to change lives, and offering an unforgettable portrait of modern India—a nation struggling to bridge economic, religious, gender, and generational divides—The World We Found is a dazzling masterwork from the remarkable Thrity Umrigar.

(retrieved from Amazon Mon, 30 Sep 2013 13:20:12 -0400)

(see all 4 descriptions)

American divorcee Armaiti has six months to live and her last wish is to see her three best friends again--Laleh, Kavita, and Nishta, all in Bombay. But Nishta's husband, Iqbal, a fellow university idealist turned fundamentalist, will be the biggest obstacle to fulfilling Armaiti's final desire.… (more)

(summary from another edition)

Quick Links

Swap Ebooks Audio
2 avail.
220 wanted
1 pay1 pay

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (3.94)
0.5
1 1
1.5
2 1
2.5 1
3 8
3.5 5
4 32
4.5 6
5 10

Recorded Books

An edition of this book was published by Recorded Books.

» Publisher information page

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

Help/FAQs | About | Privacy/Terms | Blog | Contact | LibraryThing.com | APIs | WikiThing | Common Knowledge | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | 91,471,876 books! | Top bar: Always visible