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Emako Blue

by Brenda Woods

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1685121,796 (3.94)1
Monterey, Savannah, Jamal, and Eddie have never had much to do with each other until Emako Blue shows up at chorus practice, but just as the lives of the five Los Angeles high school students become intertwined, tragedy tears them apart.

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Showing 5 of 5
This short novel portrays the grief of four teens after the death of their friend, Emako Blue. The school they attend seems predominately middle-class, but Emako takes the bus from South LA, where gangs dominate and fear is common-place. The book provides plenty of social commentary. Her friend Monterey is middle-class and has support and structure that Emako has never had. Eddie, also from a neighborhood much like Emako's, is applying for early admission to college to get out before he gets caught in someone else's crossfire. Savannah's family is wealthy, but they largely neglect her.

Emako dreams of a better life after she "makes it big" as a singer. As her friends attest, she has the talent and has already had offers. In addition, she seems to have found love with an unlikely person.

All of this comes to an abrupt end and her friends are left to mourn a person with such a promising life. This a quick read with realistic and interesting characters. It works well as social commentary. it drives the story more than character development, which is pretty predictable. Good for MS and 9-10. ( )
  elizabethholloway | Apr 12, 2010 |
This is a powerful book that grabs you and holds you until the very end. A young, pretty African-American high school student, Emako Blue, has dreams and the talent to become a famous singer. She and some of her friends, Jamal and Eddie, want to escape the world of inner-city gang violence. They have everything going for them, when Emako's life is cut short at 15, by a bullet meant for her gang-involved, just-out-of-prison, older brother Dante. Emako Blue relates to young people, because it shows real teens, real life and real dreams. It also uses the teen vernacular which lends so much credibility and the feeling of “it’s about me,” “this is me”. This book teaches many lessons: how to treat people well, how to be tolerant, follow one’s dreams and take advantage of any opportunity life offers, because there may not be others. ( )
  Alina100 | Jun 21, 2009 |
Black-Eyed Susan Book Award (NOMINATED) 2007
California Young Reader Medal (NOMINATED) 2007
Volunteer State Book Award (NOMINATED) 2007
Garden State Teen Book Award (NOMINATED) 2007
IRA Children's Book Awards (WON) 2005
Nutmeg Children's Book Award (NOMINATED) 2008
Maud Hart Lovelace Award (NOMINATED) 2007
  kongsmom | Mar 8, 2009 |
This is a powerful book that grabs you and holds you until the very end. A young, pretty African-American high school student, Emako Blue, has dreams and the talent to become a famous singer. She and some of her friends, Jamal and Eddie, want to escape the world of inner-city gang violence. They have everything going for them, when Emako's life is cut short at 15, by a bullet meant for her gang-involved, just-out-of-prison, older brother Dante. Emako Blue relates to young people, because it shows real teens, real life and real dreams. It also uses the teen vernacular which lends so much credibility and the feeling of “it’s about me,” “this is me”. This book teaches many lessons: how to treat people well, how to be tolerant, follow one’s dreams and take advantage of any opportunity life offers, because there may not be others. ( )
  rumyana2 | Mar 8, 2008 |
Notes:
Powerful story of a talented singer who's destiny is changed by urban realities. Recommend.
  elslibrary | Dec 5, 2007 |
Showing 5 of 5
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“ I am not a little girl anymore dad I can take the bus to school.”
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Monterey, Savannah, Jamal, and Eddie have never had much to do with each other until Emako Blue shows up at chorus practice, but just as the lives of the five Los Angeles high school students become intertwined, tragedy tears them apart.

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