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Divergent / Insurgent by Veronica Roth
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Divergent / Insurgent (original 2013; edition 2012)

by Veronica Roth (Author)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
10,632592427 (3.84)351
Tris's initiation day should have been marked by celebration and victory with her chosen faction; instead, the day ended with unspeakable horrors. War now looms as conflict between the factions and their ideologies grows. Transformed by her own decisions but also by haunting grief and guilt, radical new discoveries, and shifting relationships, Tris must fully embrace her Divergence, even if she does not know what she may lose by doing so.… (more)
Member:AmCorKragujevac
Title:Divergent / Insurgent
Authors:Veronica Roth (Author)
Info:Katherine Tegen Books (2012), Edition: 1st, 544 pages
Collections:Your library
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Insurgent by Veronica Roth (2013)

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Checked out 2019-07-12 — Due 2019-08-11 — Overdue
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Showing 1-5 of 585 (next | show all)
LOVED Divergent...
loved Insurgent...notice not all caps.



Maybe it was because I read this one in short spurts but I had a more difficult following it than Divergent. In hindsight, I wish I had made a list of characters while reading both books so I could keep up with relationships and who died/how.

I "checked out" Divergent from the digital library and when I finished it, there were 45 people on the waiting list for Insurgent. So, paid full price for this one on Kindle and it did not disappoint! Full of action as expected. Picked up immediately where Divergent ended. I really liked that it didn't suffer from what I call the "Nancy Drew syndrome." You know how that goes...the first few (to many) pages are summary of why the characters are the way they are/fills in history, etc. The book really explains more about the factions and by the end, you understand to some degree why they are organized the way they are. Lots more character development of the Dauntless members which was great.


The only real disappointment for me was that the relationship between Tobias and Tris was more lacking romantically than I would have liked. While I understand it is difficult to include a lot of that when the main characters are just trying to stay alive through most situations, there just seemed to be too many secrets or a lack of communication between them.

Veronica Roth has such a way with words and it is so enjoyable to read her work without being caught up by incorrect word usage, typos, contradictions, etc. Even in the midst of this dystopian novel, there was even a passage about the peace of God being a gift that I hilighted to keep. She is truly a talented author. As expected, we are left with a cliff-hanger at the end of the book and I cannot wait for the final book in the trilogy to be available. ( )
  Beth_German | Mar 28, 2020 |
I'll just start out by saying that I "finished" [b:Insurgent|11735983|Insurgent (Divergent, #2)|Veronica Roth|https://images.gr-assets.com/books/1325667729s/11735983.jpg|15524542]. And by "finish" I mean that I became so frustrated with the book after a little over a hundred pages in that I actually skipped to the end to see how interested I was in reading what was in between, and ended up skimming the intervening material.

First, I've got to ask: What did scholars and scientists ever do to this author? What is up with this? Is she somehow related to Mao or dictators in Cambodia?

Or is this an expression of broader insecurity about how widespread science and technology have become in real life, and how dependent most people have become on it, even though they don't understand it? After all, Beatrice says, "It doesn’t sit well with me, how much our society needs Erudite to function." (Page 34).

Moving on, now that I've read more about Amity and Candor, I also started thinking about Candor and its apparent role in this society. From "Divergent" we know that the members of Candor appear to specialize in law. But this doesn't seem to be the best or smartest use of their abilities. Rather, the members of Candor should be fulfilling the special role of speaking truth to power, telling people things they might not want to hear, stopping groupthink, and in general preventing the governing council from turning into an Abnegation echo chamber. That would actually be an incredibly important role, especially in a society where only one faction is supposed to be doing the governing. Also, one would think you'd want Candor overseeing whatever treasury or other financial arrangements this government has, but it doesn't appear to.

It also seems to me that Candor's motto could easily be "You shall know the truth and the truth will set you free." However, to speak the truth and for it to set you free, you have to know it. And near the end it becomes clear that the relationship between the truth and the characters is tenuous at best.

Perhaps that is why Candor is not portrayed more positively; after all, its truthfulness is equated with tactlessness, and honesty equated to making uncalled-for personal remarks. It may also be why Candor is considered the only disposable faction.

Furthermore, it would also seem that Candor's epistemological quest would be assisted by logic and philosophy, and yet those subjects are portrayed as more within the realm of Erudite. So Erudite should get along well with both Candor and Amity, but this is never discussed. In fact, I think interfactional relations should have been discussed more at some point, because it might explain some of the distrust and tension in this society. If we have Erudite-Amity, Erudite-Candor, and Candor-Dauntless, then the only faction that it appears no one really wants to interact with is Abnegation, which is nevertheless in charge of the entire government.

Also, how is it that it's some big secret that there's a larger society outside of Chicago? Shouldn't at least some of their resources be coming from somewhere outside Chicago? For example, unless everyone is getting their power from the photovoltaic cells Erudite is making, it is almost certain that Chicago is getting at least some of its electricity from a power plant somewhere outside the city. Has no one followed the power lines? Speaking of the photovoltaic cells, where is Erudite getting its lab supplies and everything else it would need to create and maintain its technology? If the city really is running solely off solar power in the day and rechargeable batteries at night, that suggests considerable technological industrial capacity and the need for rare earth metals, and so far as I know there are not large deposits of cerium, lanthanum, neodymium, or any of the others near Chicago, so they have to be coming from mines somewhere else. Where? And have Amity and Erudite really figured out how to grow cocoa and sugar cane in Chicago? Because Dauntless's chocolate cake and Erudite's fizzy drinks have to be coming from somewhere. Where is Dauntless getting its ammunition? How about fuel for the trucks, buses, and The El? And Chicago is COLD during the winter, so they'd need fuel for heating as well. And just how does this population manage to import/export nothing and yet keep their city and economy at least semi-functional?

As for the outside society, it seems they were the ones who had a terrible war of some kind, but apparently it didn't go nuclear for some reason (otherwise Chicago would be suffering from fallout, assuming Chicago still existed at all). And Amanda Ritter's video makes it sound like most people lost their moral compasses during that war. And it comes out that the people in what remains of Chicago were deliberately isolated from the rest of the world so that they could regain their moral compasses and then help the rest of the population.

The only problem is that these people don't seem to have much in the way of moral compasses either: Beatrice shoots her friend to kill even though all she needed to do was shoot to disable, while Marcus abused his son Tobias and had an affair, which resulted in Tobias's mother walking out on them. Dauntless exiles/kills its elderly (and presumably its physically disabled) and its members don't seem to care about how the faction as a whole is contributing to the factionless population and its suffering. Meanwhile, a violent wing of Erudite has attempted to commit genocide against the Abnegation, and the factionless-Dauntless are plotting genocide against Erudite. Even Beatrice says part of her wants to destroy “every single Erudite and everything they hold dear.” (Page 419). And then a majority of Amity refuse to get involved even to protect the innocent.

Furthermore, it's also been stated that Amity and Erudite must work together to ensure there is a stable food supply. If Erudite and its knowledge are completely destroyed, the entire population of the city might starve to death, but no one seems to care too much about that. And the heroine's attitude about all this? "It doesn’t sit well with me, how much our society needs Erudite to function. But they are essential – without them there would be inefficient farming, insufficient medical treatments, and no technological advance.” (Page 34). But she doesn't seem to actually worry about any of that when it comes to an indiscriminate attack on Erudite. “And then I’m standing in front of Erudite headquarters. Inside, crowds of blue-shirted people sit around tables, typing on computers or bent over books or passing sheets of paper back and forth. Some of them are decent people who do not understand what their faction has done, but if their entire building collapsed in on them before my eyes, I might not find it in me to care.” (Page 319). Even after admitting what she admitted on page 34? Does no one in this society realize they live in one?

And there is more than enough of fighting, destruction, betrayal, and bloodshed to go around. It's pretty clear that this is a very violent society in which very few people are trustworthy and almost all lack compassion. And these are the people deemed fit to restore anyone's moral compass? That of an entire society? Really?

Then too, Amanda Ritter says the fight is against human nature. Are these people not human as well? To be honest, the whole video montage she shows sounds a lot like what's been going on in Chicago - family members, friends, neighbors, and coworkers engaging in vicious hand-to-hand combat and emotionlessly shooting one another.

Oh, and it's hinted that this isolated population is supposed to genetically improve. Has no one heard of inbreeding depression?

Paradoxically, it seems to me that while non-fictional stories don't have to make sense, fictional stories do, and it's frustrating when they don't.

*Resists urge to throw book against wall, as it might damage the wall* ( )
  Jennifer708 | Mar 21, 2020 |
I'll just start out by saying that I "finished" [b:Insurgent|11735983|Insurgent (Divergent, #2)|Veronica Roth|https://images.gr-assets.com/books/1325667729s/11735983.jpg|15524542]. And by "finish" I mean that I became so frustrated with the book after a little over a hundred pages in that I actually skipped to the end to see how interested I was in reading what was in between, and ended up skimming the intervening material.

First, I've got to ask: What did scholars and scientists ever do to this author? What is up with this? Is she somehow related to Mao or dictators in Cambodia?

Or is this an expression of broader insecurity about how widespread science and technology have become in real life, and how dependent most people have become on it, even though they don't understand it? After all, Beatrice says, "It doesn’t sit well with me, how much our society needs Erudite to function." (Page 34).

Moving on, now that I've read more about Amity and Candor, I also started thinking about Candor and its apparent role in this society. From "Divergent" we know that the members of Candor appear to specialize in law. But this doesn't seem to be the best or smartest use of their abilities. Rather, the members of Candor should be fulfilling the special role of speaking truth to power, telling people things they might not want to hear, stopping groupthink, and in general preventing the governing council from turning into an Abnegation echo chamber. That would actually be an incredibly important role, especially in a society where only one faction is supposed to be doing the governing. Also, one would think you'd want Candor overseeing whatever treasury or other financial arrangements this government has, but it doesn't appear to.

It also seems to me that Candor's motto could easily be "You shall know the truth and the truth will set you free." However, to speak the truth and for it to set you free, you have to know it. And near the end it becomes clear that the relationship between the truth and the characters is tenuous at best.

Perhaps that is why Candor is not portrayed more positively; after all, its truthfulness is equated with tactlessness, and honesty equated to making uncalled-for personal remarks. It may also be why Candor is considered the only disposable faction.

Furthermore, it would also seem that Candor's epistemological quest would be assisted by logic and philosophy, and yet those subjects are portrayed as more within the realm of Erudite. So Erudite should get along well with both Candor and Amity, but this is never discussed. In fact, I think interfactional relations should have been discussed more at some point, because it might explain some of the distrust and tension in this society. If we have Erudite-Amity, Erudite-Candor, and Candor-Dauntless, then the only faction that it appears no one really wants to interact with is Abnegation, which is nevertheless in charge of the entire government.

Also, how is it that it's some big secret that there's a larger society outside of Chicago? Shouldn't at least some of their resources be coming from somewhere outside Chicago? For example, unless everyone is getting their power from the photovoltaic cells Erudite is making, it is almost certain that Chicago is getting at least some of its electricity from a power plant somewhere outside the city. Has no one followed the power lines? Speaking of the photovoltaic cells, where is Erudite getting its lab supplies and everything else it would need to create and maintain its technology? If the city really is running solely off solar power in the day and rechargeable batteries at night, that suggests considerable technological industrial capacity and the need for rare earth metals, and so far as I know there are not large deposits of cerium, lanthanum, neodymium, or any of the others near Chicago, so they have to be coming from mines somewhere else. Where? And have Amity and Erudite really figured out how to grow cocoa and sugar cane in Chicago? Because Dauntless's chocolate cake and Erudite's fizzy drinks have to be coming from somewhere. Where is Dauntless getting its ammunition? How about fuel for the trucks, buses, and The El? And Chicago is COLD during the winter, so they'd need fuel for heating as well. And just how does this population manage to import/export nothing and yet keep their city and economy at least semi-functional?

As for the outside society, it seems they were the ones who had a terrible war of some kind, but apparently it didn't go nuclear for some reason (otherwise Chicago would be suffering from fallout, assuming Chicago still existed at all). And Amanda Ritter's video makes it sound like most people lost their moral compasses during that war. And it comes out that the people in what remains of Chicago were deliberately isolated from the rest of the world so that they could regain their moral compasses and then help the rest of the population.

The only problem is that these people don't seem to have much in the way of moral compasses either: Beatrice shoots her friend to kill even though all she needed to do was shoot to disable, while Marcus abused his son Tobias and had an affair, which resulted in Tobias's mother walking out on them. Dauntless exiles/kills its elderly (and presumably its physically disabled) and its members don't seem to care about how the faction as a whole is contributing to the factionless population and its suffering. Meanwhile, a violent wing of Erudite has attempted to commit genocide against the Abnegation, and the factionless-Dauntless are plotting genocide against Erudite. Even Beatrice says part of her wants to destroy “every single Erudite and everything they hold dear.” (Page 419). And then a majority of Amity refuse to get involved even to protect the innocent.

Furthermore, it's also been stated that Amity and Erudite must work together to ensure there is a stable food supply. If Erudite and its knowledge are completely destroyed, the entire population of the city might starve to death, but no one seems to care too much about that. And the heroine's attitude about all this? "It doesn’t sit well with me, how much our society needs Erudite to function. But they are essential – without them there would be inefficient farming, insufficient medical treatments, and no technological advance.” (Page 34). But she doesn't seem to actually worry about any of that when it comes to an indiscriminate attack on Erudite. “And then I’m standing in front of Erudite headquarters. Inside, crowds of blue-shirted people sit around tables, typing on computers or bent over books or passing sheets of paper back and forth. Some of them are decent people who do not understand what their faction has done, but if their entire building collapsed in on them before my eyes, I might not find it in me to care.” (Page 319). Even after admitting what she admitted on page 34? Does no one in this society realize they live in one?

And there is more than enough of fighting, destruction, betrayal, and bloodshed to go around. It's pretty clear that this is a very violent society in which very few people are trustworthy and almost all lack compassion. And these are the people deemed fit to restore anyone's moral compass? That of an entire society? Really?

Then too, Amanda Ritter says the fight is against human nature. Are these people not human as well? To be honest, the whole video montage she shows sounds a lot like what's been going on in Chicago - family members, friends, neighbors, and coworkers engaging in vicious hand-to-hand combat and emotionlessly shooting one another.

Oh, and it's hinted that this isolated population is supposed to genetically improve. Has no one heard of inbreeding depression?

Paradoxically, it seems to me that while non-fictional stories don't have to make sense, fictional stories do, and it's frustrating when they don't.

*Resists urge to throw book against wall, as it might damage the wall* ( )
  Jennifer708 | Mar 21, 2020 |
Not as intriguing as the first book. Sometimes it felt like a chore to continue reading. ( )
  ChelseaMcE | Mar 19, 2020 |
Any worries I had about this book having some form of "mid-novel" issue have been completely erased. After reading the final page and looking back at the whole novel, it seems laughable to think I was worried it might not be as good as the first.

After the devastating simulation attack that formed Divergent's climax, Tris and the small group she escaped with seek refuge with the peaceful Amity faction. Tris is reeling from the death, grief, and betrayal that split Dauntless, took loved ones from her, and cemented Erudite and its cold leader Jeanine as the enemy. But the things Tris must come to terms with now are deeper than any single betrayal. Good people lie, and evil ones act selflessly, all to further their own motives and beliefs. Nothing is simple anymore, least of all the supposedly impenetrable lines that are supposed to divide factions and their ideals. Everyone, and every faction, is hiding secrets. And the greatest secret of all is known only by Abnegation and its surviving leader Marcus, the father Tobias despises. And it's the secret Jeanine and Erudite are prepared to destroy everything in order to keep.

In Insurgent the world the author has created is shaped, refined, and expanded in incredible ways. We, along with Tris, are pushed beyond the Dauntless compound and into the worlds of other factions, and even the rejected and bitter factionless, who belong nowhere. You love favorite characters even more, and are given plenty more reasons to hate the bad ones, although the gray areas of each person are masterfully showcased. Tris makes an absolutely fantastic heroine; she is far, far from perfect, which is why it's so fascinating and satisfying to watch her learn, grow, and shape herself with every passing event. It just feels so natural, and so does her first-person voice. The action never slows down; even when the characters aren't engaged in any fighting, infiltrating, rescuing, or otherwise, the novel still has that racing, complex plot feel that make even quiet conversations, breather scenes, or Tris's internal struggles and dialogue impossible to put down.

Another big shout-out to the romance; seriously, everyone should take YA relationship-writing advice from Ms. Roth. I can't really think how the bond between Tris and Tobias (yes Four, but Tris has chosen to call him Tobias so I'll do the same) could be any better developed. Instead of introducing a tired, obvious love triangle, or tearing one of them away from the other for the whole book with a cliche subplot and calling it relationship development, the author does just what I adored in Divergent. They fight. They disagree with each other. They feel awkward and uncomfortable sometimes. Deep, important issues like trust, differing motives and goals, and insecurities are raised between them. But they also risk their lives for each other. They show over and over again how much they care for each other. They have warm, honest, realistic, sensual encounters with each other that never go over-the-top. If you couldn't tell, I'm seriously in love with this couple and how it's written.

And while I won't spoil anything, fans who were wondering exactly what is going on to create this wonderfully original dystopian premise...you won't be disappointed. Or maybe you will be, by that ancient enemy of book lovers everywhere; the cliffhanger. But I loved the book so much I'm more than willing to forgive Ms. Roth for it, as long as she makes the third book even better and does it soon! ( )
  booksong | Mar 18, 2020 |
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I won't write a spoiler here, but Veronica Roth really has a way of wrapping up the end of the story while leaving the reader gasping at the revelation, and desperate to read more.
 

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Roth, Veronicaprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Galvin, EmmaNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Epigraph
Like a wild animal, the truth is too powerful to remain caged.

-From the Candor faction manifesto
Dedication
To Nelson,

who was worth every risk
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I wake with his name in my mouth.
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Tris Prior survives the Erudite simulation attacks that occur during the time she expected to be celebrating her achievement of being ranked first among the initiate class of her chosen faction, Dauntless. Even though the Dauntless have been freed from Erudite mind control, a war develops and secrets emerge.

AR Level 5.0, 16 pts
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