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Insurgent (Divergent) by Veronica Roth
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Insurgent (Divergent) (original 2013; edition 2012)

by Veronica Roth

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4,722374996 (3.94)276
Member:RoeschLeisure
Title:Insurgent (Divergent)
Authors:Veronica Roth
Info:Katherine Tegen Books (2012), Hardcover, 544 pages
Collections:Your library
Rating:
Tags:fiction, young adult, scifi, dystopia, Divergent

Work details

Insurgent by Veronica Roth (2013)

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Showing 1-5 of 364 (next | show all)
Tris Prior has escaped out of the dire situation at the end of the first book Divergent with Four straight into another time of action-packed scenes where truth is not as it seems and enemies seem to change with every page. She goes forward dauntlessly to figure out the truth, to find some sort of absolution for her deeds in the last book, and to understand her society.

I almost feel guilty for giving this book 1 star because it's not a horrible book. But honestly, I just didn't like it. I probably never should have picked up this second book because I didn't really like the first book (which I read a while back) as well - but I was convinced by a friend who loved it and then I didn't want to drop the book halfway in.

I've been thinking about why I dislike this book and I think it stems primarily from my disbelief of the dystopian world and the characters within this world. It just doesn't ring true to me. I say this because of the inconsistencies in character. For example, the five different groups represent five different personality traits. These factions become stereotypes of whatever they portray and seem to have no other personality traits beyond that. It's like the Dauntless can't think logically unless they're divergent. It's as if all Erudite members must be extreme nerds. It's as if someone from Amity will never argue. It infuriates me because that is such a contradiction after you get to know the more crucial characters for the book who all have different personalities and quirks like good characters do. So then why are the rest of the people in factions so darn stereotypical? It's as if these people are normal (as seen from characters we get to know like Tris or Tobias or Christina), but then not normal (as seen from supporting characters like Uriah, Caleb, and many more).

So my conclusion is that Roth doesn't go far enough into this dystopian world. The characters are just too similar to people who wouldn't live in a dystopian world until she wants to make a point that the world is different. Then all of a sudden they turn a 180 and say a line that says something to the effect of "oh I can't think logically, I'm not an Erudite" or "only the Dauntless are gutsy, you're not so you're weak". It's not consistent!!! And that infuriates me.

Another thing that just kept bothering me was the amount of times Roth had to make the obvious and overt statements that indicate Tris is divergent in terms of Erudite. I honestly don't see how she is divergent at all besides asking a lot of questions. It seems the difference between someone who's divergent and who's not is just that they aren't affected by simulations rather than personality characteristics. Which kinda blows the whole premise out of the water.

The action was as fast paced as the last book. Unfortunately that was more of a negative than a plus for me because I felt most of the action had zero to no transition, jumping from love-scene to an argument with the brother, to discovering a new twist, to running out of Candor into Amity, to shooting someone, to etc etc etc. As much as I love action, it feels like there was no thought placed into Tris's actions, like the character was falling into plot points rather than directing the story through her actions.

Okay, those are my opinions of the book - but that doesn't mean Roth is a bad writer. On the contrary, I can definitely see why many love this book. It has a strong heroine, a bad-ass love interest, many plot twists, good hate-able villains, action and adventure, and mystery. Her grammar and sentence structure has no problems. Her scenes are cohesive. It's not a bad book. I just didn't like it.

So yes, I didn't like the book, so therefore one star.
Recommended for people who read the first book Divergent (if you liked it). I just personally wouldn't recommend it to anyone. ( )
  NineLarks | Sep 15, 2014 |
Tris Prior has escaped out of the dire situation at the end of the first book Divergent with Four straight into another time of action-packed scenes where truth is not as it seems and enemies seem to change with every page. She goes forward dauntlessly to figure out the truth, to find some sort of absolution for her deeds in the last book, and to understand her society.

I almost feel guilty for giving this book 1 star because it's not a horrible book. But honestly, I just didn't like it. I probably never should have picked up this second book because I didn't really like the first book (which I read a while back) as well - but I was convinced by a friend who loved it and then I didn't want to drop the book halfway in.

I've been thinking about why I dislike this book and I think it stems primarily from my disbelief of the dystopian world and the characters within this world. It just doesn't ring true to me. I say this because of the inconsistencies in character. For example, the five different groups represent five different personality traits. These factions become stereotypes of whatever they portray and seem to have no other personality traits beyond that. It's like the Dauntless can't think logically unless they're divergent. It's as if all Erudite members must be extreme nerds. It's as if someone from Amity will never argue. It infuriates me because that is such a contradiction after you get to know the more crucial characters for the book who all have different personalities and quirks like good characters do. So then why are the rest of the people in factions so darn stereotypical? It's as if these people are normal (as seen from characters we get to know like Tris or Tobias or Christina), but then not normal (as seen from supporting characters like Uriah, Caleb, and many more).

So my conclusion is that Roth doesn't go far enough into this dystopian world. The characters are just too similar to people who wouldn't live in a dystopian world until she wants to make a point that the world is different. Then all of a sudden they turn a 180 and say a line that says something to the effect of "oh I can't think logically, I'm not an Erudite" or "only the Dauntless are gutsy, you're not so you're weak". It's not consistent!!! And that infuriates me.

Another thing that just kept bothering me was the amount of times Roth had to make the obvious and overt statements that indicate Tris is divergent in terms of Erudite. I honestly don't see how she is divergent at all besides asking a lot of questions. It seems the difference between someone who's divergent and who's not is just that they aren't affected by simulations rather than personality characteristics. Which kinda blows the whole premise out of the water.

The action was as fast paced as the last book. Unfortunately that was more of a negative than a plus for me because I felt most of the action had zero to no transition, jumping from love-scene to an argument with the brother, to discovering a new twist, to running out of Candor into Amity, to shooting someone, to etc etc etc. As much as I love action, it feels like there was no thought placed into Tris's actions, like the character was falling into plot points rather than directing the story through her actions.

Okay, those are my opinions of the book - but that doesn't mean Roth is a bad writer. On the contrary, I can definitely see why many love this book. It has a strong heroine, a bad-ass love interest, many plot twists, good hate-able villains, action and adventure, and mystery. Her grammar and sentence structure has no problems. Her scenes are cohesive. It's not a bad book. I just didn't like it.

So yes, I didn't like the book, so therefore one star.
Recommended for people who read the first book Divergent (if you liked it). I just personally wouldn't recommend it to anyone. ( )
  NineLarks | Sep 15, 2014 |
***This review will have spoilers for the first book, Divergent but not for this book.***

This book finds Tris dealing with the emotional aftermath of mortally shooting her good friend. It weighs on her conscience so heavily that she can’t even pick up a gun. She’s also processing the grief of losing her parents. The plot picks up right where Divergent left off. Tris, Tobias and what’s left of Dauntless that is still good seek refuge among the different factions while they formulate a plan to find and kill Jeanine Matthews, leader of the traitor Dauntless.

This book was definitely not as good as the first. The story was confusing at times. Tris and her group moved around so much, I kept having to refer back to see where they were. Also, she and Tobias had their mitts on each other all.the.time. Every other page they were hugging, kissing, holding hands. It was too much and too mushy. I know that they are young and in love but they are also on the run for their lives! I kept thinking about what my college psychology professor taught me. No one thinks about sex when his/her life is in danger. My final criticism is why did Tris and Tobias have to lie to each other so much? I know that the purpose was to insert some conflict into their relationship since there is no love triangle. But the reasons they were lying didn’t seem justified.

This book did have some twists and turns that I didn’t see coming and kept the story exciting. In between Tris and Tobias making out it was action packed. And the secret that is revealed in the end is definitely enough to make me read the third and final book in the trilogy, Allegiant. ( )
  mcelhra | Sep 10, 2014 |
Insurgent...Insurgent. What can I say about Insurgent. I guess the first thing I can say is that this review will contain spoilers for Divergent and probably some spoilers about Insurgent.

I could also say that I thought the plot was pretty interesting and liked that we got to see more of the world. I got bored of all the training in Divergent, so I was happy we got none of that here. I also liked that the book started right where the first book ended. After the cliff-hanger, doing anything else would have been annoying, so I liked that it just went straight into things. I also liked that we got to see more from Tobias. Yes, he's a bit of a jerk here, but considering his upbringing I thought his harshness made sense. The best part was being able to see all of the factions. Overall, I liked it a lot better than Divergent.

The story is about Tris and her gang trying to take down Erudite. A bunch of things happen, sometimes serving no purpose at all, but things happen. In the end, we're introduced to a cliff-hanger and finally answer one of the questions I had back in Divergent.

Sadly, this book and series still doesn't make sense. I'm trying, I really am, but if you thought the world and the faction didn't make sense before, be prepared for it to not make any more sense here. I mean, at all. Amity likes to strum banjos and eat toast that makes you high happy, they also grow all the food, so they still serve their purpose. Candor, I don't understand the point of them other than being jerks. What's the point of having all of your secrets laid out in the open? What do they do? Lawyers? Why would you need one in this world? What is the point of them? What's the point in any of them?

Anyways. That isn't my biggest problem. My biggest problem in Insurgent is still the biggest problem I had in Divergent. Tris. She's a horrible human being, you guys. Just horrible! She's a Divergent, which apparently isn't all that special, but she's more special compared to all the other Divergents. This means that her mind isn't easy to control and instead of falling under one faction, she actually falls under more than one. She falls under Abnegation, her original faction, Erudite, and Dauntless.

This should make her selfless, smart, and brave. Only, she's selfish, stupid, and reckless. I never got the sense that she belonged with anyone other than Dauntless. So why is she a Divergent? She doesn't think and is on some mission to sacrifice herself so she can join her parents. I get that's she's hurt, I do, but she does this so many times without talking to anyone, but expects everyone to tell her the truth and plans. She's irrational. The sad thing is that everyone looks to her for advice, because apparently you can't think properly unless you're an Erudite. The factions...why must they make no sense? Why!

...*deep breaths deep breaths*...

I really disliked how she lashed out at others, even when she's in the wrong. There is a scene where Christina and Cara are talking about her, because she killed Will, and they're not happy about her. Instead of understanding their grief, she makes it all about her and how she's a victim. She's not. She killed Will and went straight for a head shot even though she let Eric and Peter live. Why didn't she shoot his hand or leg? You want to know why. It's a curse, it's the

Remove every couple, so Tris and Tobias look normal curse

In Book One, Will and Christina hook up and it's cute and loveable and you root for them. Then Tris kills Will, leaving Christina alone. Tris also watches both her parents die, even though both were incredibly interesting characters that I would have liked to seen more of, they die because they're protecting Tris. And when I say protecting, I mean getting out of the way so we don't see a healthy relationship.

In Book Two, Edward becomes a psycho making Myra leave him, even though both seemed so in love with each other. Uriah and Maureen hook up and in pretty much the next chapter she dies. Lynn loves Maureen, so she has to die as well. Even when it seems like Christina might have someone else, he dies after saying she's cute. Shauna and Zeke are the exception to this rule, instead of dying; Shauna becomes paralyzed and has to be on a wheelchair. I suppose Caleb and Susan might be an exception too, but we don't see enough of them for this couple curse to happen. Thank God for that, because I actually like those two together.

Thus, every couple that seems to become normal and cute must have someone die so that Tris and Tobias are last couple standing.

I expect more couples dying on each other in the next book. Caleb will probably die then, so Tris can be the only person in her family alive and allowing another couple to 'break' up.

Even though I enjoyed this book a lot better than Divergent, it still has a lot of the same problems. The world doesn't make sense, the need for factions in order to find peace seems okay at first until you find out what the factions do and then you wonder what is wrong with these people. Tris is still annoying and not a strong female character. When she betrays Tobias and goes with Marcus to Erudite headquarters, she lets Marcus hit Caleb and instead of getting angry at that she gets angry that Marcus did the same thing to Tobias. With the Caleb hitting, it's justified because he's a traitor, even though Tris is technically considered a traitor at this point too......



Why is it okay for her to betray everyone and not tell anyone the reason why, but it's wrong when Caleb does it? Caleb could have a great reason to do so, why don't you...hmm, I dunno. Talk to him instead of getting angry? That would be the logical and selfless thing to do, right? Right?


I just can't with Tris.

Anywho, the ending is interesting so I'll be reading the next book the series to see what happens next. I'm hoping the next book answers my questions and makes me understand this world. I also hope that no couple is harmed by the curse.

So I guess I should end the review here. Insurgent is better than Divergent, but it's still so so flawed. ( )
  pdbkwm | Sep 8, 2014 |
I really didn't like the first half of this one of the Divergent trilogy. Lots of running around slightly pointlessly, which OK, is probably what being part of a civil war is like, but is a bit incoherent to read. And oh, Tris spends the novel making some Really Stupid Decisions without really talking to anyone, which OK, is a bit forgivable in YA where the hero is an impulsive teenager, but is completely overdone by the end. But the bits where she is held prisoner and experimented on, while implausible and a bit cliched, are totally gripping. [Main review under 'Allegiant', because I read them all back to back.] ( )
  atreic | Sep 7, 2014 |
Showing 1-5 of 364 (next | show all)
I won't write a spoiler here, but Veronica Roth really has a way of wrapping up the end of the story while leaving the reader gasping at the revelation, and desperate to read more.
 

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Epigraph
Like a wild animal, the truth is too powerful to remain caged.

-From the Candor faction manifesto
Dedication
To Nelson,

who was worth every risk
First words
I wake with his name in my mouth.
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
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Book description
Tris Prior survives the Erudite simulation attacks that occur during the time she expected to be celebrating her achievement of being ranked first among the initiate class of her chosen faction, Dauntless. Even though the Dauntless have been freed from Erudite mind control, a war develops and secrets emerge.
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"As war surges in the dystopian society around her, sixteen-year-old Divergent Tris Prior must continue trying to save those she loves--and herself--while grappling with haunting questions of grief and forgiveness, identity and loyalty, politics and love"--… (more)

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