HomeGroupsTalkZeitgeist
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Toys Go Out: Being the Adventures of a…
Loading...

Toys Go Out: Being the Adventures of a Knowledgeable Stingray, a Toughy… (2006)

by Emily Jenkins

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
3824428,205 (3.84)17
  1. 00
    Day the toys ran away by Leah Raechel Killeen (sweetiegherkin)
    sweetiegherkin: Similar concept of toys having lives of their own when children are away.
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 17 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 44 (next | show all)
Rarely am I as disappointed in a 'classic' as I was with this one. I will admit that this was a DNF. I was reading this out loud to my 5 year old, but finding so little enjoyment in it that I almost jumped up with joy when he finally told me that he didn't really care all that much for it. I was getting so weary reading it and really would have wanted nothing more than to never see the book again, yet I reiterated to him whether he would just like to pause and then resume the reading later, but he said "no, let's just return it to the library, mommy, it's not a very good book".

I'm still not sure though why it just wasn't to our liking. The premise should have been fine, after all my kid has a plethora of stuffed animals which he revers. He has a furry shark (who doubles as a pillow), a funny orange monkey with long arms and legs, stuffed dogs, dolphins, teddies, a lamb with a bell inside its belly, a little satin crab filled with rice, a silky soft otter in a handbag, a blue elephant with a lullaby music box inside, and his favorite: a skinny pink pig who could be straight out of Elephant and Piggie. But they all seem to have a lot more character, spunk and brains than the toys in this book. Which may be why we got so exasperated with them only four chapters into the story.

It did feel unimaginative, mundane, boring, obnoxious and derivative. It's possible my son might have enjoyed this more had he been younger, say three or four. It's a safe story, not too scary. I do suspect that a lot of three year olds could get fidgety though, as the story drags quite a bit.

A little research reveals that we have already read two books by this author previously. They were [b:Water in the Park|16156164|Water in the Park A Book About Water and the Times of the Day|Emily Jenkins|https://d.gr-assets.com/books/1371432504s/16156164.jpg|20477101] and [b:What Happens on Wednesdays|740778|What Happens on Wednesdays|Emily Jenkins|https://d.gr-assets.com/books/1317792978s/740778.jpg|726944]. We found both to be equally bland, equally tedious and equally unremarkable. I am going to rate this book two stars, as I did have a hint of sympathy for the Stingray character, and I reckon that some kids will take to this story. Meanwhile, we can recommend the books about Old Bear as a charming, witty alternative series about toys who come to life. These toys are clever, resourceful and caring, and all in all just way more interesting. ( )
  Fjola | Apr 23, 2015 |
This is a fun story about the life of toys in one little girls room. The toys are a little more brazen and teaches about the importance of being kind and truthful. Everyday lessons for children. ( )
  mhilary | Mar 14, 2015 |
The adventures and relationships of three slightly clueless toys - a stingray (plush, but dry clean only), a buffalo named Lumphy, and a ball named Plastic -- who help each other learn about the world. It is a very funny read aloud. The fourth graders really like it. ( )
  paakre | Apr 27, 2013 |
1/2012 Yep, I still love this book.

1/2007 I loved this book. It's simply written, engaging, and so funny that it will be hard to read aloud without dissolving into helpless giggling. Charmingly illustrated by Paul Zelinsky, this book is a little slice-of-life from the floor of a 6-year-old girl's bedroom. The toys are charmingly characterized, and their adventures terribly amusing. Read this one to your favorite kid, I think you will both enjoy it. ( )
  satyridae | Apr 5, 2013 |
Six stories plus three friends plus one little girl the friends all love, add up to a charming story just right for readers ready to move up to chapter books. StingRay has been around the longest and the other toys all look up to her. After all, she knows so much more than they do - like what it means to be a grown-up: “You’re not a grown-up until you’re at least eight…[then:] you can drive a limousine, and brush your teeth without being reminded, and you can read all the words in the dictionary, no matter how long.” Lumphy is a little buffalo who tries to be tough like a buffalo should be, but really, how could anyone face the terror of the washing machine? And Plastic is….well, Plastic isn’t actually quite sure what she is, but she’ll do whatever she can to find out. Jenkins packs plenty of gentle humor into her imagined secret life for these toys. As a bonus, since each chapter is a self-contained story, this is a perfect read-aloud for a class or at bedtime. Follow StingRay, Lumphy and Plastic on even more adventures by checking out the sequel Toy Dance Party!

Also includes pencil illustrations by Paul O. Zelinsky.

June 2010 Cover 2 Cover selection.
( )
  JenJ. | Mar 31, 2013 |
Showing 1-5 of 44 (next | show all)
no reviews | add a review
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Series (with order)
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
With great thanks to Anne Schwartz, my editor, who saw a light in my little manuscript that took place entirely in the dark. --E.J.

For Radish Bedundt and his ilk. --P.Z.
First words
The backpack is dark and smells like a wet bathing suit.
Quotations
Last words
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Publisher series
Original language

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English

None

Book description
Haiku summary

Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0375836047, Hardcover)

Here is the first book in the highly acclaimed Toys Trilogy, which is followed by the companion books Toy Dance Party and Toys Come Home. These six linked stories from Emily Jenkins, and illustrated by Caldecott Medal Winner Paul O. Zelinsky, showcase the unforgettable adventures—and misadventures—of three extraordinary friends. A Parents' Choice Silver Honor Winner, an ALA-ALSC Notable Children's Book, and an Oppenheim Toy Portfolio Platinum Book Award Winner, Toys Go Out is truly a modern classic.

Lumphy is a stuffed buffalo. StingRay is a stuffed stingray. And Plastic... well, Plastic isn't quite sure what she is. They all belong to the Little Girl who lives on the high bed with the fluffy pillows. A very nice person to belong to.

But outside of the Little Girl's room things can be confusing. Like when Lumphy gets sticky with peanut butter on a picnic, why is he called "dirty"? Or when StingRay jumps into the bathtub, what will happen to her fur? And where in the house can they find the Little Girl a birthday present that she will love the most?

Together is best for these three best friends. Together they look things up in the dictionary, explore the basement, and argue about the meaning of life. And together they face dogs, school, television commercials, the vastness of the sea, and the terrifying bigness of the washing machine.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:20:54 -0400)

(see all 3 descriptions)

Six stories relate the adventures of three best friends, who happen to be toys.

Quick Links

Swap Ebooks Audio
1 avail.
24 wanted
4 pay1 pay

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (3.84)
0.5 1
1 2
1.5 1
2 3
2.5 2
3 18
3.5 5
4 34
4.5 7
5 23

Audible.com

An edition of this book was published by Audible.com.

See editions

Recorded Books

An edition of this book was published by Recorded Books.

» Publisher information page

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

Help/FAQs | About | Privacy/Terms | Blog | Store | Contact | LibraryThing.com | APIs | WikiThing | Common Knowledge | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | 98,412,534 books! | Top bar: Always visible