HomeGroupsTalkZeitgeist
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Coolies and Cane: Race, Labor, and Sugar in…
Loading...

Coolies and Cane: Race, Labor, and Sugar in the Age of Emancipation

by Moon-Ho Jung

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingConversations
19None537,190NoneNone

None.

None
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

No reviews
no reviews | add a review
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Series (with order)
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
Quotations
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Publisher series
Original language

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English

None

Book description
Haiku summary

Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0801882818, Hardcover)

How did thousands of Chinese migrants end up working alongside African Americans in Louisiana after the Civil War? With the stories of these workers, Coolies and Cane advances an interpretation of emancipation that moves beyond U.S. borders and the black-white racial dynamic. Tracing American ideas of Asian labor to the sugar plantations of the Caribbean, Moon-Ho Jung argues that the racial formation of "coolies" in American culture and law played a pivotal role in reconstructing concepts of race, nation, and citizenship in the United States.

Jung examines how coolies appeared in major U.S. political debates on race, labor, and immigration between the 1830s and 1880s. He finds that racial notions of coolies were articulated in many, often contradictory, ways. They could mark the progress of freedom; they could also symbolize the barbarism of slavery. Welcomed and rejected as neither black nor white, coolies emerged recurrently as both the salvation of the fracturing and reuniting nation and the scourge of American civilization.

Based on extensive archival research, this study makes sense of these contradictions to reveal how American impulses to recruit and exclude coolies enabled and justified a series of historical transitions: from slave-trade laws to racially coded immigration laws, from a slaveholding nation to a "nation of immigrants," and from a continental empire of manifest destiny to a liberating empire across the seas.

Combining political, cultural, and social history, Coolies and Cane is a compelling study of race, Reconstruction, and Asian American history.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 17:59:43 -0400)

(see all 2 descriptions)

How did thousands of Chinese migrants end up working alongside African Americans in Louisiana after the Civil War? With the answer to this question and stories of these workers, Coolies and Cane advances a view of emancipation that moves beyond U.S. borders and the black-white racial dynamic. Tracing the source of Asian labor to the sugar plantations of the Caribbean, Moon-Ho Jung argues that the racial stereotypes of "coolies" played a pivotal role in reconstructing concepts of race, nation, and citizenship in the United States. Jung examines how the Chinese appeared in major U.S. political debates on race, labor, and immigration between the 1830s and 1880s. He finds that white conceptions of "coolies" were articulated in many, often contradictory, ways. These laborers could mark the progress of freedom; they could remind Southerners of the barbarism of slavery. Welcomed and rejected as neither black nor white, "coolies" emerged recurrently as both the salvation of the fracturing and reuniting nation and a threat to American civilization. Based on extensive archival research, this study makes sense of these contradictions to reveal how American impulses to recruit and exclude Chinese labor enabled and justified a series of historical transitions: from slave-trade laws to racially coded immigration laws, from a slaveholding nation to a "nation of immigrants," and from a continental empire of manifest destiny to a liberating empire across the seas. Combining political, cultural, and social history, Coolies and Cane is a compelling study of race, Reconstruction, and Asian American history.--Publisher description.… (more)

Quick Links

Swap Ebooks Audio
2 wanted

Popular covers

Rating

Average: No ratings.

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 119,452,910 books! | Top bar: Always visible