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The Problem with Work: Feminism, Marxism,…
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The Problem with Work: Feminism, Marxism, Antiwork Politics, and Postwork… (original 2011; edition 2011)

by Kathi Weeks

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Title:The Problem with Work: Feminism, Marxism, Antiwork Politics, and Postwork Imaginaries (a John Hope Franklin Center Book)
Authors:Kathi Weeks
Info:Duke University Press Books (2011), Paperback, 304 pages
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The Problem with Work: Feminism, Marxism, Antiwork Politics, and Postwork Imaginaries by Kathi Weeks (2011)

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Brilliant stuff. Now to make sense of my notes... ( )
  deeronthecurve | Jan 19, 2017 |
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0822351129, Paperback)

In The Problem with Work, Kathi Weeks boldly challenges the presupposition that work, or waged labor, is inherently a social and political good. While progressive political movements, including the Marxist and feminist movements, have fought for equal pay, better work conditions, and the recognition of unpaid work as a valued form of labor, even they have tended to accept work as a naturalized or inevitable activity. Weeks argues that in taking work as a given, we have “depoliticized” it, or removed it from the realm of political critique. Employment is now largely privatized, and work-based activism in the United States has atrophied. We have accepted waged work as the primary mechanism for income distribution, as an ethical obligation, and as a means of defining ourselves and others as social and political subjects. Taking up Marxist and feminist critiques, Weeks proposes a postwork society that would allow people to be productive and creative rather than relentlessly bound to the employment relation. Work, she contends, is a legitimate, even crucial, subject for political theory.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:11:47 -0400)

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Duke University Press

2 editions of this book were published by Duke University Press.

Editions: 0822350963, 0822351129

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