HomeGroupsTalkZeitgeist
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Romanticism by David Blayney Brown
Loading...

Romanticism (2001)

by David Blayney Brown

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingConversations
47None247,300 (4.75)None

None.

None
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

No reviews
no reviews | add a review
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Series (with order)
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
Quotations
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Publisher series
Original language

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English

None

Book description
Haiku summary

Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0714834432, Paperback)

Romanticism was "a way of feeling" rather than a style in art in the period c.1775-1830. Against the background of the French Revolution and Napoleonic Wars, artists, poets and composers across Europe initiated their own rebellion against the dominant political, religious and social ethos of the day. Their quest was for personal expression and individual liberation, directness and spontaneity, with an emphasis on the unique integrity of every work. In the process, the Romantics changed the idea of art, seeing it as an instrument of social and psychological change. In this comprehensive volume, David Blayney Brown takes a thematic approach to this fascinating period of art history, relating it to the concurrent, more stylistic movements of Neoclassicism and the Gothic Revival, and discussing its integral relationship with the political and social developments of the era. He not only looks at how artists as diverse as Goya in Spain, Delacroix in France, Friedrich in Germany and Turner in Britain responded to landscapes or depicted historical events, but also examines artists such as David and Ingres who are not usually considered Romantics. Brown examines the influence of Romantic ideas on American artists and concludes with an analysis of the universal relevance of Romantic ideas. As a result, the reader is given an understanding of a movement that produced some of the greatest and most inspiring European art, literature and music.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:10:22 -0400)

"Romanticism was 'a way of feeling' rather than a style in art. In the period c.1775-1830, against the background of the French Revolution and Napoleonic Wars, European artists, together with poets and composers, initiated their own rebellion against the dominant political, religious and social ethos of the day. Their quest was for personal expression and individual liberation, and in the process the Romantics transformed the idea of art, seeing it as an instrument of social and psychological change.". "In this volume, David Blayney Brown takes a thematic approach to Romanticism, relating it to the concurrent, more stylistic movements of Neoclassicism and the Gothic Revival, and discussing its relationship with the political and social developments of the era. He not only looks at how artists as diverse as Goya, Delacroix, Friedrich and Turner responded to landscapes or depicted historical events, but also examines painters such as David and Ingres who are not usually considered Romantics. Brown concludes with an analysis of the continuing relevance of Romantic ideas. As a result, the reader is given a clear understanding of a complex movement that produced some of the greatest European art, literature and music."--BOOK JACKET.… (more)

Quick Links

Swap Ebooks Audio
1 avail.
1 wanted
1 pay

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (4.75)
0.5
1
1.5
2
2.5
3
3.5
4
4.5 1
5 1

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 119,562,583 books! | Top bar: Always visible