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Gifts from the Gods: Ancient Words and…
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Gifts from the Gods: Ancient Words and Wisdom from Greek and Roman…

by Lise Lunge-Larsen

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This book is about words that we use commonly that have been given to us by Greek myths. This book doesn't have a plot line, but rather it is a collection of myths. It does tell of some interesting myths. For example it tells about Tantalus who fed his children to the Gods. Zeus was so angry he put Tantalus in a pool of water with apple trees around it. Then Tantalus was given a starving hunger and a burning thirst, but every time he went to get a drink the water lowered and every time he tried to get an apple it would rise up so he could never satisfy himself. That is were we get the word "tantalize".

I did like this book for nostalgia reasons mostly. I did like this book because of the fact that it was interesting how some words came from Greek myths. I think the myths they chose were very interesting and how they chose words that we're familiar with. Some of the words include, victory and panic. The myths that they put in the book really kept my attention. I do recommend this book to anyone. ( )
  AndrewH.BG3 | Feb 28, 2017 |
This was a really interesting book. The art was great, the stories were great. The extra little information at the end of each story really tied together what the audience had just read. I enjoyed reading about some common words we use today, and how they were used in Greek/Roman mythology.
  KelseySchroeder | Apr 10, 2016 |
This is a collection of of myths from Greek and Roman mythology. It is unique in that it strives to illuminate and illustrate the origin of words through the myths. I appreciated that the author took great care to use Greek mythology when the word came directly from Greek language. If the word had latin roots it was illustrated using Roman mythology. The author explains in a note that as a result of the Romans taking over Greece and becoming enthralled with their stories that they took many of the stories and made them their own and often gave the gods and goddesses their own new names when translating them in to Latin. The illustrations in the collection are wonderful and breathe life in to the text with the detailed depictions of the gods, goddesses, and mortals. The landscapes are rich and authentic to the time periods and geographic locations.
  Keinhorn | Jan 16, 2016 |
Anthology of Greek myths. ( )
  Glorydaze | Oct 24, 2015 |
It is a book full of legends of Greek mythology. This book is very good for students in 5th and 7th grade help enterder historical events of ancient Greece
  ana.j.diaz.1 | Jan 18, 2015 |
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0547152299, Hardcover)

Ancient names come to rich and fascinating life in this lavishly illustrated gift book for mythology fans and word lovers.
Did you know that “museums” were initially temples built to worship the nine muses, the goddesses of the arts? That “Janus” was the god of the doorways and hallways, and we have named our janitors after him?
Where did these words — and other words, such as chaos, genius, nemesis, panic, echo, and narcissus — come from? From the ancient stories of the Greeks — stories that rang so true and wise that the names of the characters have survived for centuries as words we use every day. The brief stories here not only impart the subtle wisdom of these ancient tales, but make us understand the words, and our own world, more deeply.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:11:45 -0400)

"Did you know that museums were initially temples built to worship the nine muses, the goddesses of the arts? That Janus was the god of the doorways and hallways, and we have named our janitors after him? Where did these words--and other words, such as chaos, genius, nemesis, panic, echo, and narcissus--come from? From the ancient stories of the Greeks--stories that rang so true and wise that the names of the characters have survived for centuries as words we use every day. The brief stories here not only impart the subtle wisdom of these ancient tales, but make us understand the words, and our own world, more deeply."--Amazon.com.… (more)

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