HomeGroupsTalkZeitgeist
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

The Myth of Manliness in Irish National…
Loading...

The Myth of Manliness in Irish National Culture, 1880-1922

by Joseph Valente

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingConversations
1None3,689,591NoneNone
Recently added byEdMadden

None.

None
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

No reviews
no reviews | add a review
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Series (with order)
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
Quotations
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Publisher series
Original language

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English

None

Book description
Haiku summary

Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0252035712, Hardcover)

 

This study aims to supply the first contextually precise account of the male gender anxieties and ambivalences haunting the culture of Irish nationalism in the period between the Act of Union and the founding of the Irish Free State. To this end, Joseph Valente focuses upon the Victorian ethos of manliness or manhood, the specific moral and political logic of which proved crucial to both the translation of British rule into British hegemony and the expression of Irish rebellion as Irish psychomachia. The influential operation of this ideological construct is traced through a wide variety of contexts, including the career of Ireland's dominant Parliamentary leader, Charles Stewart Parnell; the institutions of Irish Revivalism--cultural, educational, journalistic, and literary; the writings of both canonical authors (Yeats, Synge, Gregory, and Joyce) and subcanonical authors (James Stephens, Patrick Pearse, Lennox Robinson); and major political movements of the time, including suffragism, Sinn Fein, Na Fianna E Éireann, and the Volunteers.
 
The construct of manliness remains very much alive today, underpinning the neo-imperialist marriage of ruthless aggression and the sanctities of duty, honor, and sacrifice. Mapping its earlier colonial and postcolonial formations can help us to understand its continuing geopolitical appeal and danger.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:01:42 -0400)

""This is undoubtedly a pioneering study. It discusses constructions of Irish manhood in one of the most decisive periods of Irish nationalist mobilization with a degree of ingenuity, authority, and commitment that is simply unmatched in the field."--Joe Cleary, author of Outrageous Fortune: Capital and Culture in Modern Ireland --"Valente proceeds to significantly reshape our sense of what the major ideological structures of Irish natinalist culture were during this period. He demonstrates so convincingly that his conception of manlines was absolutely crucial to a wide range of cultural discourses that, by the time I finished I was wondering why no one had seen all this before. But no one had."--Marjorie Howes, author of Colonial Crossings: Figures in Irish Literary History --"Valente's book on manlines and Irish nationlism is one of the most startlingly illuminating books I have ever read on Irish literature."--Vicki Mahaffey, author of Reauthorizing Joyce --This study supplies the first contextually precise account of the male gender anxieties and ambivalences haunting the culture of Irish nationalism in the era preceding the Irish Free State. To this end, Joseph Valente focuses upon the Victorian ethos of manliness, the specific moral and political logic of which proved crucial to both the translation of British rule into British hegemony and the expression of Irish rebellion as Irish psychomachia. The influential operation of this ideological construct is traced through a wide variety of contexts, including the career of Ireland's dominant Parliamentary leader, Charles Stewart Parnell; the institutions of Irish Revivalism; the writings of both canonical authors (Yeats, Synge, Gregory, and Joyce) and subcanonical authors (James Stephens, Patrick Pearse, and Lennox Robinson); and the major political movements of the time. --The construct of manliness remains very much alive today, underpinning the neo-imperialist marriage of ruthless aggression to the sanctities of duty, honor, and sacrifice. Mapping its earlier colonial and postcolonial formations clarifies its continuing danger and appeal. "--Book jacket.… (more)

Quick Links

Swap Ebooks Audio
1 wanted

Popular covers

Rating

Average: No ratings.

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 120,629,936 books! | Top bar: Always visible