HomeGroupsTalkZeitgeist
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Moscow, the Fourth Rome: Stalinism,…
Loading...

Moscow, the Fourth Rome: Stalinism, Cosmopolitanism, and the Evolution of…

by Katerina Clark

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingConversations
211495,208 (2.5)None

None.

None
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

When it's all said and done this effort to analyze Soviet politics through the prism of literary/cultural theory fell flat for me. While I'm not going to say that Clark is attempting to rehabilitate Soviet culture by keeping Stalinism at arms-length (yes, I've seen that argument made), the more annoying aspect is that she abandons her metaphor of Soviet Moscow as a new Rome very quickly, making you wonder why she even bothered to invoke it. A more conventional contrast between the conflicting demands of the messianic tendencies of the Party, the requirement of Popular Front politics to make overseas connections and the eventual pressing need to bolster Russian nationalism might have served Clark better; though that probably would have rendered much of her background as a cultural analyst irrelevant. ( )
  Shrike58 | Sep 17, 2012 |
no reviews | add a review
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Series (with order)
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
Quotations
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Publisher series
Original language

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English (1)

Book description
Haiku summary

Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0674057872, Hardcover)

In the early sixteenth century, the monk Filofei proclaimed Moscow the “Third Rome.” By the 1930s, intellectuals and artists all over the world thought of Moscow as a mecca of secular enlightenment. In Moscow, the Fourth Rome, Katerina Clark shows how Soviet officials and intellectuals, in seeking to capture the imagination of leftist and anti-fascist intellectuals throughout the world, sought to establish their capital as the cosmopolitan center of a post-Christian confederation and to rebuild it to become a beacon for the rest of the world.

Clark provides an interpretative cultural history of the city during the crucial 1930s, the decade of the Great Purge. She draws on the work of intellectuals such as Sergei Eisenstein, Sergei Tretiakov, Mikhail Koltsov, and Ilya Ehrenburg to shed light on the singular Zeitgeist of that most Stalinist of periods. In her account, the decade emerges as an important moment in the prehistory of key concepts in literary and cultural studies today—transnationalism, cosmopolitanism, and world literature. By bringing to light neglected antecedents, she provides a new polemical and political context for understanding canonical works of writers such as Brecht, Benjamin, Lukacs, and Bakhtin.

Moscow, the Fourth Rome breaches the intellectual iron curtain that has circumscribed cultural histories of Stalinist Russia, by broadening the framework to include considerable interaction with Western intellectuals and trends. Its integration of the understudied international dimension into the interpretation of Soviet culture remedies misunderstandings of the world-historical significance of Moscow under Stalin.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:20:00 -0400)

No library descriptions found.

Quick Links

Swap Ebooks Audio
3 wanted

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (2.5)
0.5
1
1.5
2
2.5 1
3
3.5
4
4.5
5

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 119,562,904 books! | Top bar: Always visible