HomeGroupsTalkZeitgeist
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Whipscars and Tattoos: The Last of the…
Loading...

Whipscars and Tattoos: The Last of the Mohicans, Moby-Dick, and the Maori

by Geoffrey Sanborn

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingConversations
4None1,664,912NoneNone
Recently added bymattcrow, Tamatu, cuhlibrary, rasandberg

None.

None
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

No reviews
no reviews | add a review
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Series (with order)
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
Quotations
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Publisher series
Original language

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English

None

Book description
Haiku summary

Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0199751692, Hardcover)

In Whipscars and Tattoos, Geoffrey Sanborn dramatically transforms the standard interpretations of two of the most important novels in American literary history. On the basis of original scholarship showing that Magua, the supposed villain of The Last of the Mohicans, and Queequeg, the supposed emblem of love in Moby-Dick, are based on Maori chiefs, Sanborn argues that each character is, above all else, an embodiment of the fiercely majestic qualities that were conventionally associated with high-ranking Maori men.

In this striking transnational context, The Last of the Mohicans reappears before us as a simultaneously elitist and anti-racist novel, influenced not only by the contemporary conception of the Maori as the tribal people most likely to establish an independent, modernizing nation, but by the surge of political idealism that accompanied the global revolutions of the early 1820s. Moby-Dick undergoes a similarly profound metamorphosis. By enabling us to see Queequeg as an incarnation of the quintessentially Maori virtues of mana and tapu--power and untouchability--Sanborn makes it possible for us to see the White Whale as the epitome of those virtues, opening us to a vision of the world in which every being is moved and shaped by a furious, doomed insistence on its value.

Formally as well as argumentatively, Whipscars and Tattoos breaks new ground. Rather than restrict his account of the Maori to an overview of Western representations of New Zealand, Sanborn devotes entire chapters to the life stories of Te Ara and Te Pehi Kupe, the chiefs on whom Magua and Queequeg were modeled. The result is a book in which life bleeds into literature and back again, in which Maori biographies cross-fertilize with readings of American novels, and in which defiant self-assertion is provocatively reimagined as the basis of our relationship to the world.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:03:12 -0400)

"In Whipscars and Tattoos, Geoffrey Sanborn dramatically transforms the standard interpretations of two of the most important novels in American literary history. On the basis of original scholarship showing that Magua, the supposed villain of The Last of the Mohicans, and Queequeg, the supposed emblem of love in Moby-Dick, are based on Maori chiefs, Sanborn argues that each character is, above all else, an embodiment of the fiercely majestic qualities that were conventionally associated with high-ranking Maori men. In this striking transnational context, The Last of the Mohicans reappears before us as a simultaneously elitist and anti-racist novel, influenced not only by the contemporary conception of the Maori as the tribal people most likely to establish an independent, modernizing nation, but by the surge of political idealism that accompanied the global revolutions of the early 1820s. Moby-Dick undergoes a similarly profound metamorphosis. By enabling us to see Queequeg as an incarnation of the quintessentially Maori virtues of mana and tapu--power and untouchability--Sanborn makes it possible for us to see the White Whale as the epitome of those virtues, opening us to a vision of the world in which every being is moved and shaped by a furious, doomed insistence on its value..."--Publisher description.… (more)

Quick Links

Swap Ebooks Audio

Popular covers

Rating

Average: No ratings.

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 119,739,674 books! | Top bar: Always visible