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Rabbit, Run by John Updike
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Rabbit, Run (1960)

by John Updike

Other authors: See the other authors section.

Series: "Rabbit" Series (1)

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4,826851,381 (3.59)341
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English (83)  Dutch (1)  German (1)  All languages (85)
Showing 1-5 of 83 (next | show all)
This book reminded me a lot of Catcher in the Rye. First of all, let me say that I can understand why this book was groundbreaking in the early 60's The sexuality, while tame by today's standards, was probably very shocking back then. I have nothing to say about the actual writing. Clearly Updike is a talented technician, but the story. I couldn't stand the main character. And not in a I love to hate him kind of way. Everyone in his life tried to help him or more than that, he expected everyone to try and make his life better. He had no real passion, drive, thoughts of any interest, just I'm unhappy at the time someone make it better. That could be a basis for and interesting story, but I just found this one boring and a little annoying. ( )
  ZephyrusW | Jul 29, 2018 |
Rabbit, Run is the book that established John Updike as one of the major American novelists of his—or any other—generation. Its hero is Harry “Rabbit” Angstrom, a onetime high-school basketball star who on an impulse deserts his wife and son. He is twenty-six years old, a man-child caught in a struggle between instinct and thought, self and society, sexual gratification and family duty—even, in a sense, human hard-heartedness and divine Grace. Though his flight from home traces a zigzag of evasion, he holds to the faith that he is on the right path, an invisible line toward his own salvation as straight as a ruler’s edge.
  JESGalway | Apr 25, 2018 |
Excerpts from my original GR review (Jul 2012):
- "He accelerates. The growing complexity of lights threatens him. He is being drawn into Philadelphia. He hates Philadelphia. Dirtiest city in the world they live on poisoned water. He wants to go south, down, down the map into orange groves and smoking rivers and barefoot women."
- Well, Rabbit Angstrom and his '55 Ford don't make it to Florida, not even close. But he is running, and this early scene won't be the last time he makes a ragged dash, away from a sordid little life that is too "closed in".
- Anyone who's vaguely heard of this book, or the Rabbit novels as an enterprise, knows that the 26 year old former high school star is deplorable. That he verbally abuses his wife, now pregnant with their second child, while sidebarring with a painted lady named Ruth, secures the guy's status from the start. If, however, the reader can get past the large red neon sign that is Rabbit, he may find a resonant anthem to middle America at the edge of 1960.
- What Updike does very well is convince you with the dialogue that redemption is reasonably achievable, while all the while knowing in your gut that doom is waiting around the corner. This novel was pretty racy for 1960; the undisguised lust in Rabbit's mind is put to the page, and even the minister's wife isn't off limits to his roving eye.
- Tragedy is immured into this story, so it's no real shock when it comes. And he does run again, this time without wheels, again unable to face life's realities.
- A lot of depth of feeling, intelligent writing. This novel influenced many other writers. Read it if you haven't. ( )
  ThoughtPolice | Apr 12, 2018 |
I couldn't get through the book. I felt like it was a chick lit book for men. It is about a basketball star leaving his wife and screwing a woman. None of the characters interested me. ( )
  KamGeb | Aug 10, 2017 |
So, now I know I don't care for Updike. If you like Anne Tyler, I think you will like Updike.



( )
  Kitty.Cunningham | Jul 19, 2017 |
Showing 1-5 of 83 (next | show all)
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» Add other authors (16 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Updike, Johnprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Germeraad, R.Translatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Epigraph
The motions of Grace,
the hardness of the heart;
external circumstances
-- Pascal, Pensee 507
Dedication
First words
Boys are playing basketball around a telephone pole with a backboard bolted to it.
Quotations
A serious shadow crosses her face that seems to remove her and Harry, who sees it, from the others, and takes them into that strange area of a million years ago from which they have wandered; a strange guilt pierces Harry at being here instead of there, where he never was. Ruth and Harrison across from them, touched by staccato red light, seem to smile from the heart of damnation. (p. 144, Penguin 1964 ed.)
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0449911659, Paperback)

Rabbit, Run is the book that established John Updike as one of the major American novelists of his—or any other—generation. Its hero is Harry “Rabbit” Angstrom, a onetime high-school basketball star who on an impulse deserts his wife and son. He is twenty-six years old, a man-child caught in a struggle between instinct and thought, self and society, sexual gratification and family duty—even, in a sense, human hard-heartedness and divine Grace. Though his flight from home traces a zigzag of evasion, he holds to the faith that he is on the right path, an invisible line toward his own salvation as straight as a ruler’s edge.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:22:23 -0400)

(see all 5 descriptions)

Tired of the responsibility of married life, Rabbit Angstrom leaves his wife and home.

» see all 5 descriptions

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Average: (3.59)
0.5 7
1 40
1.5 11
2 91
2.5 26
3 226
3.5 93
4 327
4.5 43
5 207

Penguin Australia

2 editions of this book were published by Penguin Australia.

Editions: 0141187832, 0141037520

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