HomeGroupsTalkZeitgeist
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

The Night Sky: A Journey From Dachau to…
Loading...

The Night Sky: A Journey From Dachau to Denver and Back

by Maria Sutton

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingConversations
144683,257 (4.5)None

None.

None
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

Showing 4 of 4
When Maria learned as a middle-aged woman that the man she knew as Father all her life actually wasn’t it devastated her. That she found out by overhearing her mother in conversation with a friend from the old country was purely accidental yet this former federal investigator made it her purpose in life to discover who her real father was.
She found out that like her mother he had been in the camps at Dachau and was with her afterwards in the displaced persons camp, that he was a Polish air force hero and had worked on a farm where she and her sister had been born. The mystery was why this man had then abandoned them and her mother married another. It also explained why her mother had really never shown much affection to her hard-working husband after they had been placed in Denver rather than go back to war-stricken Ukraine after the war.
In a search that took decades Maria travelled all over Germany and Eastern Europe holding out against all hope that her real father had perhaps survived, and although would know be in his eighties, still be thrilled to see her. She craved knowing who he and her extended European family would be and hoped they would accept her. Would the fantasies she had carved out in her mind come to fruition when she finally found him?
Not only did her journey answer her questions but gave her frail aging mother the benefit of seeing her elder brother again after over forty years apart it helped her mother discover the truths about her own father too. A compelling story that left me both weeping, smiling but satisfied by journeys end.
( )
  MarkPSadler | Jan 17, 2016 |
When Maria learned as a middle-aged woman that the man she knew as Father all her life actually wasn’t it devastated her. That she found out by overhearing her mother in conversation with a friend from the old country was purely accidental yet this former federal investigator made it her purpose in life to discover who her real father was.
She found out that like her mother he had been in the camps at Dachau and was with her afterwards in the displaced persons camp, that he was a Polish air force hero and had worked on a farm where she and her sister had been born. The mystery was why this man had then abandoned them and her mother married another. It also explained why her mother had really never shown much affection to her hard-working husband after they had been placed in Denver rather than go back to war-stricken Ukraine after the war.
In a search that took decades Maria travelled all over Germany and Eastern Europe holding out against all hope that her real father had perhaps survived, and although would know be in his eighties, still be thrilled to see her. She craved knowing who he and her extended European family would be and hoped they would accept her. Would the fantasies she had carved out in her mind come to fruition when she finally found him?
Not only did her journey answer her questions but gave her frail aging mother the benefit of seeing her elder brother again after over forty years apart it helped her mother discover the truths about her own father too. A compelling story that left me both weeping, smiling but satisfied by journeys end.
( )
  MarkPSadler | Jan 17, 2016 |
Imagine finding out that the man you thought as your father, who had provided, cared and reared you was not. How would you react?

The author takes us on a totally amazing journey through her own history, as well as her mothers history. Discovering her father was a prisoner of war, as was her mother, she starts to uncover the horrors that were inflicted upon the people at the time, what both drew her mother and father together and also what made them separate. Her mother then met another man in a similar position to herself and married him and came to live in America.

Her story of her life in America is a happy one until the bombshell of her father rocks her world. On travelling to Germany to find her father she traces him to his native Poland, where he has fathered more children. On trying to find our what her father was like, will her hopes and dreams of him be shattered? Along the journey she finds out that her uncle, who was separated from her mother at a young age in the prisoner of war camp, is still alive and living in America. Can the lost souls make up for 35 years of being apart, thinking that each other was dead.

In retelling her story, the authors trail to find her real father is one of trepidation, excitement and hope. A really moving and emotional read, touching the heartstrings ,as the journey can be compared to riding a roller coaster. The amount of time and patience shown by the author is one of immense proportion - which is shown throughout the book. An excellent read. ( )
  beckvalleybooks | Dec 18, 2011 |
When I had received the request to review this book I agreed with the understanding I would not be able to get to it until around Christmas time. I was home sick today and decided to just check it out. I could not stop reading the book. The time Marie put into searching for her father and other family members is a testament to her family's perseverance in the face of what seemed like impossible issues. I know that a lot of what Marie learned was painful, yet she is very positive about what she has learned. There are lessons for all of us. I told her in an email that I could relate to some of what she had felt when discovering her family. My husband ran into an aunt he had been told was dead. This accidental meeting led him to the father he had never known and allowed them to have two years together before he lost his dad. He learned he had step-sisters and a step-brother. He learned a short time after this that he had a daughter and grand-kids.

Reading her book has made me realize how many gaps I have in my own history and how I need to fill them for my own children. Often things are lost through divorce. My daughter learned a few years back that her grandmother on her dad's side had pictures of her home in Cuba. She learned her uncle had barely escaped Cuba while his two best friends had been executed. We owe it to our children to pass on our history whether it is good or bad so that they have answers to their questions.

This book is a memoir that I would say is a must read. I look forward to telling all of my friends about it. ( )
  skstiles612 | Sep 18, 2011 |
Showing 4 of 4
no reviews | add a review
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Series (with order)
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
Quotations
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Publisher series
Original language

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English

None

Book description
Haiku summary

No descriptions found.

No library descriptions found.

Quick Links

Swap Ebooks Audio
3 wanted

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (4.5)
0.5
1
1.5
2
2.5
3 1
3.5
4
4.5
5 3

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 119,646,519 books! | Top bar: Always visible