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The Battery by Gallimard Jeunesse
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The Battery

by Gallimard Jeunesse

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Amazon.com Amazon.com Review (ISBN 0590926829, Hardcover)

Did you know that volts were named after Alessandro Volta? Or that the word "electricity" comes from elektron, the Greek word for amber? With this compact book and activity kit in the Scholastic Discovery Box series, kids ages 6 and older can revel in the wonders of electricity--without being shocked. Descriptions of electric rays (the fishy kind), fireballs, lightning, twitching frogs, and Saint Elmo's fire are sure to spark the interest of your favorite young science buffs, and certainly get them excited about the prospect of electrical experimentation. Each kit comes with everything you need to complete an electric circuit: a magnesium strip (starring as one electrode) and a steel paper clip (the costarring electrode), two wires with metal clips, a plastic dish, a packet of salt, and a "musical disk" that activates when the circuit is successfully completed. Just add water, stir in the salt until it dissolves, attach the metal objects to the clips, and let the music begin! (We only heard a strange, high-pitched buzzing, but found that satisfactory in itself.) The accompanying richly illustrated, caption-packed, 32-page booklet is peppered with all sorts of fascinating facts about the history and workings of electricity, and more information about batteries than you can shine a flashlight at. (Ages 6 and older) --Karin Snelson

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:22:08 -0400)

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