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Remarkable by Elizabeth Foley
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Remarkable (edition 2012)

by Elizabeth Foley

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1129107,804 (3.66)1
shelf-employed's review
I often seek for a passage from a book that sums up its mood, purpose or theme. Lizzie K. Foley’s generally light-hearted writing style in Remarkable does not lend itself to finding this insightful quote. However, as I neared the end of this madcap romp through the remarkable days of the remarkable town of Remarkable, I found the passage I was seeking in the wise words of John Doe to his granddaughter, Jane, the only two unremarkable people in town,

“The world is a wonderfully rich place, especially when you’re not trapped by thinking that you’re only as worthwhile as your best attribute.”

Remarkably wise advice for brilliant people everywhere, which slyly points out the converse advice for a world full of John and Jane Does - just being ordinary can be extraordinary. That Lizzie K. Foley can deliver this important message while humorously entertaining us with a peg leg pirate, the delightfully evil Grimlet Twins, a cryptozoological lake creature named Lucky, a "townful" of positively remarkable characters, and of course, unremarkable Jane Doe, is, in itself, remarkable.

www.shelf-employed.blogspot.com ( )
1 vote shelf-employed | Apr 19, 2012 |
All member reviews
Showing 9 of 9
This book is about the way kids can feel like outsiders, which is taken to the extreme in this absurd situation where Jane is the only ordinary person around (besides her grandfather). The humor is funny for adults and the insightful child - like Jane's last name being "Doe" and the teachers playing fantasy football in the staff room. (That definitely feels like a tidbit thrown in for classroom teachers reading this book to or with students.)
  vsoler | Jun 4, 2014 |
This a page turning mystery story that will keep kids guessing. It is about a town, Remarkable, where everyone is extraordinary. However, ten year old Jane Doe is the only average person in town and is kind of an outcast. When twins and a pirate captain come to town to reveal everyone's secretes that make them extraordinary it is Jane Doe who saves the day and the town. A great short mystery for young readers. ( )
  natalie.loy | Jun 4, 2014 |
3296
  BRCSBooks | Dec 17, 2013 |
Jeb tended to get angry when he was hungry--a condition known as "being hangry." ...from p.145

I know this condition well. The most dangerous place for anyone would be between me and my food.

As you might imagine, etiquette experts tend not to be particularly fun, kind, or loving--which is why they should never be parents. But the etiquette experts never understand this, and so they often have children anyway. ...from p.233

Zing!!


This was a nice enough story of a young girl learning to appreciate and accept herself. It's possible the younger me may have liked this book a little more. There's certainly plenty to swoon over. Pirates! A sea monster! Misfits! This would be a fun read-aloud too. It's just...I found it impossible to relate to Jane Doe (our protagonist) and the town is filled with snooty, holier-than-thou types. Yikes!

In my family, a book like this could maybe serve as a sort of cautionary tale. Jane Doe is a doormat and lets anyone and everyone shit all over her. Don't be a Jane.

Quick note: I received this book courtesy of Goodreads' First Reads program. ( )
  diovival | Oct 14, 2013 |
Cute concept, nicely executed. Middle-grade mysteries are just not my thing, though, no matter how clever they are. Witness my failure to warm up to [b:The Westing Game|902|The Westing Game|Ellen Raskin|http://photo.goodreads.com/books/1347493933s/902.jpg|869832] with which I have seen this book compared. ( )
  satyridae | Apr 5, 2013 |
Illustrated Review
In the town of Remarkable, everyone is just that—remarkably talented, remarkably intelligent, remarkably strong or even remarkably good-looking—except 10-year-old, completely ordinary Jane Doe… Continue reading → ( )
  bibliovermis | Feb 23, 2013 |
Jane is the only average girl in a town where everyone is remarkable. She is soon befriended by the Grimlet Twins and the three of the adventure as they try to help others and save the town lake serpent named Lucky. The story clearly has an ulterior motive in telling us that everyone is special, even if they might not recognize that it is so. Jane might be average but her adventures with the troublemaking Grimlet Twins depict a girl who is resourceful, kind, and smart in ways that others aren't. Written with great details that don't overwhelm, children will enjoy discovering who Jane really is just as Jane discovers it herself. Written for middle school aged children, those who are looking for adventure stories or who might be a little distanced from their peers will enjoy this book. Recommended. ( )
  jjpionke | Dec 6, 2012 |
Every once in a while a book comes along that is about nothing--and yet incredibly fun to read! It's hard for me to give a rave review to a fantasy that doesn't really have much magic in it, but I really enjoyed this one. It was funny, in a mild way, and there were a lot of kooky characters, and there was always something bizarre and interesting going on. It really worked to keep me reading, all the way to the end. I think it might be worth trying with a class because it seems like a book that almost every kid would enjoy, no matter what kind of books they generally like reading. ( )
  Inky_Fingers | Nov 11, 2012 |
I often seek for a passage from a book that sums up its mood, purpose or theme. Lizzie K. Foley’s generally light-hearted writing style in Remarkable does not lend itself to finding this insightful quote. However, as I neared the end of this madcap romp through the remarkable days of the remarkable town of Remarkable, I found the passage I was seeking in the wise words of John Doe to his granddaughter, Jane, the only two unremarkable people in town,

“The world is a wonderfully rich place, especially when you’re not trapped by thinking that you’re only as worthwhile as your best attribute.”

Remarkably wise advice for brilliant people everywhere, which slyly points out the converse advice for a world full of John and Jane Does - just being ordinary can be extraordinary. That Lizzie K. Foley can deliver this important message while humorously entertaining us with a peg leg pirate, the delightfully evil Grimlet Twins, a cryptozoological lake creature named Lucky, a "townful" of positively remarkable characters, and of course, unremarkable Jane Doe, is, in itself, remarkable.

www.shelf-employed.blogspot.com ( )
1 vote shelf-employed | Apr 19, 2012 |
Showing 9 of 9

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