HomeGroupsTalkZeitgeist
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Coup D'état by Ben Coes
Loading...

Coup D'état

by Ben Coes

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingConversations
138786,938 (4.04)None

None.

None
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

Showing 1-5 of 7 (next | show all)
It's a hard to believe B-Movie at times, but the narrative and writing drives you ahead to the end. ( )
  dougcornelius | Mar 3, 2016 |
Solid plot line and lots of action. ( )
  aujames95 | Jul 7, 2014 |
Pakistan has elected a new leader: a radical cleric named Omar El-Khayab, who is determined to spread Islam throughout the world by any means necessary--including violent jihad. A series of relatively minor events cause tension between India and Pakistan to escalate, until Pakistan drops a nuclear bomb on an Indian city. Now, America must find a way to resolve this conflict before it becomes a full-scale nuclear war between the India and Pakistan, which would doubtless draw their allies, America and China, into conflict with one another, leading to the bloodiest war the world has ever seen.

The only plan that has a hope of defusing the situation without the loss of millions of lives is to forcibly remove El-Khayab from power, and install a new leader who is willing to make peace with India. The only man with a hope of succeeding is Dewey Andreas. Unfortunately, he is in Australia, trying to avoid being killed by terrorists seeking revenge. Somehow, he must escape them, get to Pakistan, and accomplish the coup d'etat--in only two days.

Coup d'Etat by Ben Coes is a thriller, to be published in September 2011. Its story, and particularly the buildup to the war, is surprisingly believable: tensions escalate as a result of minor, but realistic, confrontations and misunderstandings, and the major figures are realistically bound by political considerations, which leads to the proposal of the unorthodox solution which gives the book its title.

The story's verisimilitude is Coup d'Etat's best feature; it doesn't fare so well in other respects. The realistic buildup of tensions between Pakistan and India come at the price of making the first hundred pages slow and uninteresting. The dialogue and narration are often stilted and filled with jarring use of idiom and reference to particular brand names. Worse, Coes seems unable to write more than a few pages about Dewey without admiring his manly physique and cold attitude. When people meet Dewey for the first time, we're assured that they are in awe of his muscles and intimidating presence.

This emphasis on masculinity is detrimental to the book in general, and to the reader's sympathy for the protagonists in particular. The protagonists kill a number of people without any compunction, and sometimes with relish. Dewey enjoys keeping his opponents alive just long enough to see panic and defeat in their eyes, before killing them.

If you can stomach the praise of masculinity and militarism, and are willing to wade through the first quarter of the book until it picks up, Coup d'Etat has a pretty good story to tell. With these caveats, I'd cautiously recommend it to readers looking for a thriller examining potential conflict in the Middle East.

Disclosure: This review is based on a free advance copy of the book. ( )
  Sopoforic | Feb 4, 2014 |
I wanted to like this book ... but I didn't. Sure the action scenes were exciting and the core conflict between India and Pakistan was something different. But the execution of the story was ... bad. First, one of the essential components of the story was the worry that China would invade India but this worry was never satisfactorily explained. More problematic was the "need" to use a former special forces operative who has been "out of the game" for 10 or more years) as the only person who could lead a team to take on a highly improbable mission. And it's worth noting that the protagonist chosen for this special mission isn't able to speak the language, so that's not the reason for choosing him. I had a hard time getting past the idea that a 40-year-old ex-special forces soldier who didn't speak the language was more competent that an active duty soldier who did speak the language. Did I mention that the mission was so highly improbable as to be laughable? The downside risk was so high and alternate possibilities seemed much more likely to have success.

There were several other problems that really bothered me too. We learn early on that the protagonist apparently developed a relationship with the woman at the center of Power Down ... but that relationship took place "off screen" between that book and this one, thus really weakening any impact that it was supposed to have. It felt as if when the author began writing this second book, he decided he needed to go back and add a missing chapter to the previous story.

Another problem: For some reason, in this book, guns don't have muzzles, they have "nozzles". I've read a lot of thrillers over the years, but I've never read a book where muzzles are referred to as "nozzles". And it wasn't just once. It was numerous times (and the word muzzle never appears). I know. I searched.

And finally we come to one of the most glaring problems that I've ever encountered in a thriller like this (well, other than the similar sequence of errors in Power Down: Coes desperately needs an editor who pays attention to chronological sequences in books. I've actually thought of writing an open letter to Coes about this problem. Anyway, long story short, an event occurs and the author is very careful to describe the timing from the event until the Indian President is informed (37 minutes) followed by what the Indian President does in response. In the next chapter, the American President learns of the event (which happened in India) just 5 minutes after the event and calls the Indian President one minute later. But the Indian President (who won't learn of the event for 31 more minutes) not only knows about it, he's already had the discussions with his cabinet. Sure that may be nitpicking, but it just rips me right out of the story and makes me start watching for other, similar problems.

I may read another Dewey Andreas novel. I like his character and I like parts of the story. But the flaws are so huge, that I'm quite wary. ( )
  MSWallack | Oct 17, 2013 |
Great read! Fast paced and absolutely cover to cover action. I couldn't put this book down.

This is book 2 in the Dewey Andreas story. I really like these books and look forward to the rest of the series.

Dewey gets recruited in Australia, where he's hiding out from Fortuna, by the US Govt to overthrow Pakistan's president to avert nucleus war with India - and drawing China and the US into the mix.

Unfortunately, Dewey doesn't kill all the bad guys so there are some left to chase him in the next books... ( )
  plunkinberry | Feb 19, 2013 |
Showing 1-5 of 7 (next | show all)
no reviews | add a review
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Series (with order)
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
Quotations
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Publisher series
Original language

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English (1)

Book description
Haiku summary

Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0312580762, Hardcover)

The wait is over—Ben Coes, whose debut Power Down was called “the must read thriller of the year” (Vince Flynn) is back and at the top of his game with a mesmerizing new novel

Wanting only a peaceful, obscure life, Dewey Andreas has gone to rural Australia, far from turbulent forces that he once fought against. But powerful men, seeking revenge, have been scouring the earth looking for Dewey. And now, they've finally found him - forcing Dewey to abandon his home and to fight for his life against a very well armed, well trained group of assassins.

Meanwhile, a radical cleric has been elected president of Pakistan and, upon taking power, sets off a rapidly escalating conflict with India.  As the situation spins quickly out of control, it becomes clear that India is only days from resorting to a nuclear response, one that will have unimaginably disasterous results for the world at large.  With only days to head this off, the President sends in his best people, including Jessica Tanzer, to do whatever it takes to restore the fragile peace to the region.  Tanzer has only one viable option - to set up and execute a coup d'etat in Pakistan - and only one man in mind to lead the team that will try to pull off this almost unimaginable task in the nerve-wrackingly short time frame, Dewey Andreas. If, that is, Jessica can even get to Dewey and if Dewey can get out of Australia alive...

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:19:44 -0400)

(see all 3 descriptions)

"Wanting only a peaceful, obscure life, Dewey Andreas has gone to rural Australia, far from turbulent forces that he once fought against. But powerful men, seeking revenge, have been scouring the earth looking for Dewey. And now, they've finally found him - forcing Dewey to abandon his home and to fight for his life against a very well armed, well trained group of assassins. Meanwhile, a radical cleric has been elected president of Pakistan and, upon taking power, sets off a rapidly escalating conflict with India. As the situation spins quickly out of control, it becomes clear that India is only days from resorting to a nuclear response, one that will have unimaginably disasterous results for the world at large. With only days to head this off, the President sends in his best people, including Jessica Tanzer, to do whatever it takes to restore the fragile peace to the region. Tanzer has only one viable option - to set up and execute a coup d'etat in Pakistan - and only one man in mind to lead the team that will try to pull off this almost unimaginable task in the nerve-wrackingly short time frame, Dewey Andreas. If, that is, Jessica can even get to Dewey and if Dewey can get out of Australia alive.."--… (more)

» see all 2 descriptions

Quick Links

Swap Ebooks Audio
2 avail.
23 wanted

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (4.04)
0.5
1
1.5 1
2 1
2.5
3 4
3.5 1
4 15
4.5 3
5 9

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

You are using the new servers! | About | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 117,110,685 books! | Top bar: Always visible