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The Eye of the Moon by Shelley Davidow
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The Eye of the Moon

by Shelley Davidow

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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 097466832X, Paperback)

The Eye of the Moon is at once an exploration of love, identity and heartbreak against the backdrop of the changing political face of southern Africa, and a critique of life in North America through the eyes of a young immigrant. It is a poetic memoir about loving and forgiving- men, and women, and continents. It is ultimately also about the undoing of cliches and fixed perceptions of the world. Born and raised in South Africa, the narrator (the I, you, and she of her own story) has, at a tender age, already seen too much of certain things-blood and death and poverty . In a very real sense, she is the embodiment of the country she so passionately loves and must, for her own sake, leave. Marriage and a journey to England and the heartland of America , both intended to free her, only serve to enslave and nearly destroy her, as both she and her new husband struggle to distance themselves from former lovers and the country of their birth. How she discovers her Africa within, how she becomes whole and wholly loved, is the triumph of this story. The Eye of the Moon falls into several categories-memoir, feminist, literary, prose-poetry-and transcends them all. The language is liquid and sensual, the emotional intensity of the narrative, terrifying. It is exactly the right length, hauntingly beautiful, and unforgettable. "It is true that no matter which hemisphere you are in, no matter which way up the moon is, its face is invariably sad. In the northern hemisphere, it appears that tears have carved into the moon's left eye, gouged furrows down the left-hand side of the face. In the southern regions, the moon's right eye weeps; tears seem to have been blown up over the forehead by some cosmic wind, and the traces can never be wiped from the surface because they are not surface tears." --from The Eye of the Moon

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:22:15 -0400)

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