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The Horse and His Boy by C. S. Lewis
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14,124144147 (3.89)238
Member:PaperbackPirate
Title:The Horse and His Boy
Authors:C. S. Lewis
Info:HarperCollins (2005), Paperback, 304 pages
Collections:Your library
Rating:*****
Tags:2006

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The Horse and His Boy by C. S. Lewis (1954)

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English (134)  Dutch (3)  Spanish (2)  Polish (1)  Portuguese (Brazil) (1)  Italian (1)  Danish (1)  Portuguese (Portugal) (1)  All languages (144)
Showing 1-5 of 134 (next | show all)
Part of “The Chronicles of Narnia” series, “The Horse and His Boy” begun in March and completed at the end of July 1950. “The Horse and His Boy” was published on September 6, 1954. The story takes place during the reign of the Pevensies in Narnia, an era which begins and ends in the last chapter of “The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe.” A talking horse called Bree and a young boy named Shasta, both of whom are in bondage in the country of Calormen, are the protagonists. By "chance,” they meet and plan their return to Narnia and freedom. Along the way they meet Aravis and her talking horse Hwin who are also fleeing to Narnia.

Original date: 1954 ( )
  faithfilly | Jan 30, 2016 |
I want to give this book in the series 3 stars, but I just didn't like it enough. It really came across to me as "just okay". This is a difficult read, for a number of reasons:

* Aslan attacks children and other characters, because they needed to pay for their "sins". If he's the Narnian "Jesus", this isn't the Jesus I know in the Bible.
* The grammar is intensely difficult in some chapters, and mind numbingly easy in others. Almost, as if Lewis was in one mood one day, and a different mood another.
* Lewis gets caught into paragraph-long similes and metaphors. Not frequent, but enough that it's annoying.
* The political planning of the kings about war falls flat and is difficult to follow.
* Parenthetical statements are on nearly every page, some of which are long enough to forget the line of thought you should be on.
* The conflict between Tashbaan and Narnia/Archenland is anticlimatic.
* The resolution falls so flat, it's really quite hard to call it a resolution at all.
* Lewis' racism towards the Middle Eastern culture (Islam, Hindu, etc.) is blatant, scathing, and appalling. Sure, I get it- "arabs" were unknown in the '50s, and seen as something of a peculiarity. At least keep the racism to yourself when writing a story, however.

With that said, there were some redeeming qualities of the book:

* The foreshadowing of Shasta as a twin brother to Corin was subtle and written well.
* Each of the characters had a very clear personality that didn't drift or change as the story progressed.
* Lewis did well with some of the world building, such as the Tombs, Tashbaan, Anvard, and other places.
* My daughter laughed when things were funny, got mad when things weren't going as she wanted, and cried when things got sad. It's emotionally engaging at times, for sure.

Overall though, this book is a disappointment. It's really not a chronicle of Narnia, but a chronicle of Archenland with Narnian characters as part of the plot. Clearly, Lewis wanted to write in "arabs" as "bad guys" and make a point of a culture he knew very little about, and in my opinion, damaging his reputation and series as a whole. ( )
  atoponce | Jan 29, 2016 |
Third (chronologically speaking) in the Narnia fantasy series by CS Lewis. When I was a teenager, I didn't really like this book, and often left it out when re-reading the series. It doesn't begin (as most of the others do) in our world and while the four Pevensie children are now kings and queens of Narnia, and do come into the book, they're fairly minor characters.

But I thoroughly enjoyed it on re-reading just now. It's the story of Shasta, who escapes from his home when he realises that his father plans to sell him. He meets a talking Narnian horse who also wants to escape, and they meet two more escapees along the way. Lots of excitement, and Lewis's wonderful writing make this an excellent story. Perhaps more than any of the others it works as a one-off. Although it takes place in another world, with talking animals, the fantasy element is low key; and while there are undoubtedly Christian allusions, they're low-key enough to be ignored or unnoticed.

Definitely recommended. Possibly four and a half stars. ( )
  SueinCyprus | Jan 26, 2016 |
Third (chronologically speaking) in the Narnia fantasy series by CS Lewis. When I was a teenager, I didn't really like this book, and often left it out when re-reading the series. It doesn't begin (as most of the others do) in our world and while the four Pevensie children are now kings and queens of Narnia, and do come into the book, they're fairly minor characters.

But I thoroughly enjoyed it on re-reading just now. It's the story of Shasta, who escapes from his home when he realises that his father plans to sell him. He meets a talking Narnian horse who also wants to escape, and they meet two more escapees along the way. Lots of excitement, and Lewis's wonderful writing make this an excellent story. Perhaps more than any of the others it works as a one-off. Although it takes place in another world, with talking animals, the fantasy element is low key; and while there are undoubtedly Christian allusions, they're low-key enough to be ignored or unnoticed.

Definitely recommended. Possibly four and a half stars. ( )
  SueinCyprus | Jan 26, 2016 |
Bravery, sacrifice, and a great yarn about identity, redemption, and the folly of pride. ( )
  memlhd | Jan 23, 2016 |
Showing 1-5 of 134 (next | show all)
In the opinion of this admirer, "The Horse and His Boy" is relatively unispired. It does not glow as much as the incomparable first book of the series, "The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe." It has not as much gay satire and plain excitement as several of the others. Just possibly the Narnian fields are suffering from overcropping, and could stand lying fallow while other fields are put back into cultivation.
added by Shortride | editThe New York Times Book Review, Chad Walsh (pay site) (Oct 17, 1954)
 

» Add other authors (21 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
C. S. Lewisprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Baynes, PaulineIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Baynes, PaulineCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Dillon, DianeCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Dillon, LeoCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Georg, ThomasIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Hammar, BirgittaTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Hane, RogerCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Helakisa, KaarinaTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Jennings, AlexNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Lavis, StephenCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Neckenauer, UllaTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Nielsen, CliffCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Van Allsburg, ChrisCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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[None]
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To David and Douglas Gresham
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This is the story of an adventure that happened in Narnia and Calormen and the lands between, in the Golden Age when Peter was High King in Narnia and his brother and his two sisters were King and Queens under him.
Quotations
And he writhed inside at what seemed the cruelty and unfairness of the demand. He had not yet learned that if you do one good deed your reward usually is to be set to do another and harder and better one.
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
Please do NOT combine "The Horse and his Boy" with "The Chronicles of Narnia".

Unabridged. Please do NOT combine with any abridged edition.
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0020442009, Paperback)

original CS Lewis classic!

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:20:16 -0400)

(see all 9 descriptions)

A boy and a talking horse share an adventurous and dangerous journey to Narnia to warn of invading barbarians.

(summary from another edition)

» see all 15 descriptions

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