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The Rule of Three: Surviving and Thriving in…
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The Rule of Three: Surviving and Thriving in Competitive Markets

by Jagdish Sheth

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Amazon.com Amazon.com Review (ISBN 074320560X, Hardcover)

The Rule of Three, by Jagdish Sheth and Rajendra Sisodia, offers an innovative take on corporate development that could help leaders put their own operations into a new context that improves competitive strategies and boosts market performance. Sheth and Sisodia, consultants and marketing professors, base it on their contention that just three major players ultimately emerge in all markets--such as ExxonMobil, Texaco, and Chevron in petroleum, and Gerber, Beech-Nut, and Heinz in baby foods. These giant "full-line generalists" are eventually surrounded by smaller "specialists" who successfully concentrate on niche products (such as high-end audio gear) or niche markets (like fashions for professional women), along with midsized "ditch-dwellers" who struggle to reach an audience in between (like second-tier airlines that compete with goliaths on price and regionals on service). The authors examine this pattern of market evolution and the "radical disruption" that can occur when technology or regulation changes or a new entry "succeeds in altering the rules" (as Starbucks did by sneaking up on coffee's Big Three). Appendices present helpful examples of the way this has shaken out in various industries. --Howard Rothman

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:15:53 -0400)

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