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The Etymologicon: A Circular Stroll through…
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The Etymologicon: A Circular Stroll through the Hidden Connections of the… (original 2011; edition 2011)

by Mark Forsyth

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8053717,142 (3.9)39
Member:DanielAustin
Title:The Etymologicon: A Circular Stroll through the Hidden Connections of the English Language
Authors:Mark Forsyth
Info:Icon Books (2011), Hardcover, 288 pages
Collections:Your library
Rating:
Tags:loc_language

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The Etymologicon: A Circular Stroll Through the Hidden Connections of the English Language by Mark Forsyth (2011)

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» See also 39 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 37 (next | show all)
Interesting, may have to listen to again to memorize some of the interesting snippets. ( )
  scottkirkwood | Dec 4, 2018 |
Listened to the introduction and about 2 minutes of the first chapter on Audible ... this may be easier to take in written form, but as a read-aloud it was torture. In the intro he jokes about assailing a companion with unwanted tidbits about word origins--but once the book starts, that's how it feels--imagine Grandpa Simpson's tedious nonsensical soliloquies but with some word origins thrown in.

I just couldn't stand it. Sorry. Switched to Flann O'Brien's The Third Policeman instead (totally different, nothing to do with word origins). ( )
  ashleytylerjohn | Sep 19, 2018 |
Rather breathless, light hearted look at unsuspected etymological connections. Probably not 100% reliable. ( )
  Robertgreaves | Aug 26, 2018 |
So much fun! Yeah, no detailed references, but as I was telling my boyfriend the stories behind the words and connections he was like, "No way that's true. I'm gonna google that," but it always worked out that the information was more or less correct :p ( )
  Joanna.Oyzon | Apr 17, 2018 |
The book itself is funny and informative, but the audiobook is infinitely skippable. I'll be picking up more of these, but they'll be hard copies only because the narrator's affect was so flat, it made finishing it a chore. ( )
  Dez.dono | Mar 27, 2018 |
Showing 1-5 of 37 (next | show all)
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Book description
Haiku summary
Littered with many
Aaahh moments - a joy to read
From start to finish.
(passion4reading)
Enlightening book
About the origins of
Common English words.
(passion4reading)

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(see all 2 descriptions)

Springing from writer and journalist Mark Forsyth's hugely popular blog The Inky Fool and including word-connection parlour games perfect for any word-lovers get-together, The Etymologicon is a brilliant map of the secret labyrinth that lurks beneath the English language.There's always a connection. Sometimes, it's obvious: an actor's role was once written on a roll of parchment, and cappuccinos are the same colour as the robes of a Capuchin monk. Sometimes the connection is astonishing and a little more hidden: who would have guessed that your pants and panties are named after Saint Pantaleon, the all-compassionate?… (more)

(summary from another edition)

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