HomeGroupsTalkZeitgeist
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

The Cold Cold Ground (Detective Sean Duffy…
Loading...

The Cold Cold Ground (Detective Sean Duffy 1) (original 2012; edition 2012)

by Adrian McKinty

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
2051857,211 (3.95)23
Member:cerievans1
Title:The Cold Cold Ground (Detective Sean Duffy 1)
Authors:Adrian McKinty
Info:Serpent's Tail (2012), Paperback, 256 pages
Collections:Your library
Rating:****
Tags:Read in 2012, Ireland

Work details

The Cold, Cold Ground by Adrian McKinty (2012)

None.

None
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 23 mentions

English (16)  Spanish (1)  German (1)  All languages (18)
Showing 1-5 of 16 (next | show all)
THE COLD, COLD GROUND is Book #1 in Adrian McKinty’s The Troubles Trilogy. It is a Detective Sean Duffy novel.
The locale is Northern Ireland in the 1980s with real events woven into the narrative.
The title opens with Sean Duffy (a Catholic in the RUC - Royal Ulster Constabulary - in Carrickfergus, Northern Ireland) working riot duty in the aftermath of Bobby Sands’s death in the Maze Prison. “Bobby Sands was the maitreya, the world teacher, the martyr who would redeem mankind through his suffering.” (Powerful musings from our Sean.)
The title is intermixed with hopelessness, violent current events, and thoughtful, classical, philosophical and articulate musings by Sean.
Sean Duffy is a melancholy character; angry, yet thoughtful and intelligent. He is likeable, interesting, yet immoral. He is ‘quite the talker’ and can often manipulate situations. He feels trapped and finds it hard to believe his own philosophy of serving in the RUC - that he can achieve some good, some positive balance or example in spite of his surroundings.
Sean, not surprisingly, has very bad (sometimes comical) luck with women. He never gets into his car before checking for bombs underneath.
The character of Sean Duffy is an unforgettable one. I read all 3 books in the trilogy, plus a new 4th Sean Duffy title in less than 2 weeks. I couldn’t let him (and his musings) go.
The characters and events were intriguing.
The real main character was the rain.
I would highly recommend all the ‘Troubles Trilogy’ titles - COLD, COLD GROUND, I HEAR THE SIRENS IN THE STREET and IN THE MORNING I’LL BE GONE. THE GUN STREET GIIRL is a Detective Sean Duffy, also.
With very thoughtful, intricate characterizations, an unforgettable sense of place, and compelling mysteries - this series is impossible not to like. The locale, the people and events (true and fictional) will stay with you long after the reading is finished. ( )
  diana.hauser | May 4, 2015 |
Okay... I got this series mixed up with Stuart Neville's... at first I thought it might have been only because they are both set in Ireland but... I think the main characters are similar as well, and the books have a noir tone to them.

That being said, this is an interesting and engaging series, even though it is a bit thick with Irish politics and the "Troubles" which are foreign to someone of my age and nationality. I am vaguely aware of the circumstances of Ireland in the 80s, but never lived them, so the stage set for this story was not at all familiar to me.

So, while some reviewers had a little rant about the veracity of some of the author's settings, I didn't read this book for historical accuracy and am okay not knowing any better. And I have no idea why some readers found the author's writing style or language choices to be pretentious... maybe they were reading it as a literary exploration of Ireland during the 80s and saw things in it that weren't really there?

Fortunately, I read it hoping it was a noir detective story... and that's exactly what it is. It is dark and violent and a bit confusing as to what motivated people to behave the way they did, but that's what makes it worth reading - to figure it out. I bought the rest of the series as soon as I finished this one. ( )
1 vote crazybatcow | Mar 18, 2015 |
Adrian McKinty is a man who has drunk of the Pierian spring, and wants us to know it. But, as he might put it, doubtless explicitly mentioning Alexander Pope on the way, this writing well exemplifies that poet's adage that a little learning is a dangerous thing, for what learning there is here is worn, shall we say, rather heavily. I wonder are any of his readers as impressed as McKinty is by his range of reference, from ancient Greek mythology - and even orthography!! - via Cicero to Puccini and the Ramones? After all, who could fail to admire a Catholic 'peeler' in the RUC who refers to the works of Mozart by K number? But then again, who could believe in such a man?

If he sticks with it, the reader does get past the clumsy explications for our stateside friends, the inconsistent Americanisms in diction, the self-consciously aggressive, macho prose, the obligatory, unconvincing sex scene, the unnecessarily heavy-handed dollops of domestic detail, tying the events so very precisely to time and place, the equally unnecessary, and thus all the more irritating literary licence (or perhaps just mistakes) with similar reference to those same times and places; maybe McKinty doesn't remember Belfast in 1981 as well as he thinks he does.

And this is the problem: if McKinty himself could just get out of the way, this might make quite a good thriller - the last third or quarter really does get page-turningly unputdownable, although the denouement has rather the desperate and unsatisfying feel of the 'and then I woke up; it had all been a dream!' variety.

And none of this is helped by the frankly appalling copy-editing: someone at Serpent's Tale should be kneecapped.

So: Must try harder, Mr McKinty - or maybe not so hard? ( )
1 vote jtck121166 | Jan 3, 2015 |
Brilliantly evocative of Northern Ireland and Belfast in the troubled early 1980s. Sean Duffy is a Catholic sergeant in the largely Protestant RUC, difficult enough on its own without having an inquisitive self-destruct streak. In this first story of a series Sean investigates what appears to be a homosexual killing but is unconvinced that there are deeper, sectarian motives at play. Despite the dark setting the story is enlivened by strongly drawn characters and witty dialogue written by someone with direct knowledge of the authentic places and times depicted. I particularly enjoyed an imagined exchange between Sean Duffy and Gerry Adams in the Maze prison. Highly recommended. ( )
1 vote edwardsgt | Dec 22, 2014 |
A hard-boiled mystery from Northern Ireland that takes place during the "troubles". This audio version was ruined by a very poor narrator, Gerard Doyle. He may be of Irish origins, but tried so very hard to do a Belfast accent that it ended up monotone. The tough cop sounded feminine. Ridiculous analogies such as "Belfast was spread out before me like a great slab of meat in a butcher's yard" stood out with magnified importance. I may read more by the author but for now I'm done with McKinty. ( )
1 vote VivienneR | Dec 8, 2014 |
Showing 1-5 of 16 (next | show all)
no reviews | add a review
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Series (with order)
Canonical title
Original title
Information from the Spanish Common Knowledge. Edit to localize it to your language.
Alternative titles
Original publication date
Information from the Spanish Common Knowledge. Edit to localize it to your language.
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
It is rumoured that after concluding his song about
the war in Ilium, Homer sang next of the war
between frogs and rats.
              -Jorge Luis Borges, "The Immortal," 1949
Dedication
First words
The riot had taken on a beauty of its own now.
Quotations
Last words
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Publisher series
Original language

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English

None

Book description
Haiku summary

No descriptions found.

In a 1981 Northern Ireland rife with sectarian violence, Catholic detective Sean Duffy investigates a serial killer who is targeting gay men--a series of murders that may have political implications as well.

(summary from another edition)

» see all 4 descriptions

Quick Links

Swap Ebooks Audio
1 avail.
52 wanted
5 pay4 pay

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (3.95)
0.5
1
1.5
2 3
2.5 1
3 16
3.5 4
4 27
4.5 5
5 19

Audible.com

2 editions of this book were published by Audible.com.

See editions

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

Help/FAQs | About | Privacy/Terms | Blog | Store | Contact | LibraryThing.com | APIs | WikiThing | Common Knowledge | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | 99,016,936 books! | Top bar: Always visible