HomeGroupsTalkZeitgeist
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Mad Women: The Other Side of Life on Madison…
Loading...

Mad Women: The Other Side of Life on Madison Avenue in the '60s and Beyond

by Jane Maas

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
934129,846 (3.69)9

None.

None
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 9 mentions

Showing 4 of 4
I listened to the audiobook and it was really good. The reader had a very silky voice that could put you to sleep. It was interesting to hear the woman's perspective of the Mad Men Show and how it was in advertising in the 60's. We've really come a long way over the last 50 years. ( )
  MHanover10 | Jul 10, 2016 |
This book caught my eye because 1)my husband and I are huge Mad Men fans and 2)my husband is a creative partner at an advertising agency and I like learning more about the industry in which he works. I constantly pause Mad Men while we’re watching and ask him incredulously, “Did stuff like that really happen back then??” Ninety-nine percent of the time, his answer is yes. I was really interested to read a book from a woman’s point of view of the era and industry.

Jane Maas has some great stories. She writes in a very conversational style, almost stream of consciousness at times. One memory will remind her of another memory. At times, this works well and at times it makes the transitions and flow awkward. She is not afraid to drop names which is awesome – I don’t necessarily respect discretion in a memoir – I want specifics and dirt!

Jane was a high ranking advertising executive with a fairly progressive husband and a full-time live-in housekeeper/nanny to help her raise her two daughters. Therefore, her life was quite different from a secretary’s life during this era. Naturally this book is focused on what life was like for her and the handful of female executives like her. There is a little information on what it was like for the girls in the typing pool but not much.

Jane mentions the TV show Mad Men a few times, usually to point out an inaccuracy, which I appreciated. This book was published after the fourth season so only examples from the first four seasons are used.

This was a very quick read as it’s only a little over 200 pages long with fairly large font. Reading it was an enjoyable way to spend a Sunday afternoon and I liked learning more about the world of 1960s advertising. ( )
  mcelhra | Oct 10, 2012 |
really interesting. good narrator ( )
  mahallett | Aug 14, 2012 |
For fans of the AMC television series, “Mad Men,” (It is said elsewhere of the show that it is about: “the conflicting desires of men and those who suffer because of them” —a paraphrase) Jane Maas’s memoir of working in the advertising biz in NYC during that time is more than a little interesting. She deliberately gives us the woman’s point of view of the 1960s advertising culture as presented by the show. Generally, I think she confirms that the show gets most things right, but cautions that not every agency behaved the same. She writes with wit and honesty (she notes that most memoirs of advertising done in the past have been efforts on the authors’ parts to advertise themselves and their companies), and begins her story with her college years at Smith and then Bucknell (she is great pals with Philip Roth – they did drama together and have been lifelong friends), explaining the culture that someone like the show’s Betty Draper came out of. She began in advertising as a copywriter in 1964 and rose to become the creative director and agency officer (Don Draper’s position). Eventually she would become president of another agency.

Maas, through her own experiences and those of others women she has talked with, discusses sex in the office, the three-martini lunch and other vices, the creative revolution, money, and being a working mother during those years…etc One of my favorite chapters—“Get the Money Before They Screw You”—discusses the treatment of women in the workplace, the lack of respect, the disparate salaries (women were considered a ‘bargain’ to hire, even into the feminist era), and the fact that women weren’t even taken seriously as consumers.

“Ask any woman who worked at an advertising agency in the Mad Men era. Of course we didn’t make the same salary as a man with the same title, even if we knew we were doing a better job. We didn’t even have equal space—the guys got offices with windows; we got cubicles. The problem was we simply submitted to the situation. Women’s lib had not yet flowered, and our consciousness had definitely not be raised.”

Mad Women is a quick, enjoyable read, written for perhaps the generations younger than I am, those who have no experience with the 60s. Readers from other countries may find the discussions of various American ads from the era a bit difficult to slog through, but I’m sure most of these ads can be found on the internet or YouTube these days. (I admit to reminding myself of an old Maxim coffee commercial starring actress Patricia Neal by watching one on YouTube, after Maas told how difficult her husband, children’s author Roald Dahl was to work with (to put that politely). According to Maas’s recollections, I think we fans of the show should expect all the creative departments to be regularly smoking dope by the 1970s (which doesn’t surprise some of us at all…) and, if the show continues long enough, there's going to be a revolution, hey, hey....(I'm singing this part...) ( )
1 vote avaland | Apr 26, 2012 |
Showing 4 of 4
no reviews | add a review
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Series (with order)
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
For all those wonderfully sane,
mad women in my life
First words
This book of Janes is hilarious but so real that anyone infatuated with Man Men and anyone who is interested in advertising and the 1960s must buy it and learn a lot while laughing. (Introduction by Mary Wells Lawrence.)
"Was it really like that?" (Chapter 1)
Quotations
Last words
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Publisher series
Original language

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English

None

Book description
Haiku summary

Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0312640234, Hardcover)

"Breezy and salty.” –The New York Times

“Hilarious! Honest, intimate, this book tells it as it was.” –Mary Wells Lawrence, author of A Big Life (In Advertising) and founding president of Wells Rich Greene

“Breezy and engaging [though] …The chief value of Mad Women is the witness it bears for younger women about the snobbery and sexism their mothers and grandmothers endured as the price of entry into mid-century American professional life.” –The Boston Globe

“A real-life Peggy Olson, right out of Mad Men.”  –Shelly Lazarus, Chairman, Ogilvy & Mather

What was it like to be an advertising woman on Madison Avenue in the 60s and 70s – that Mad Men era of casual sex and professional serfdom? A real-life Peggy Olson reveals it all in this immensely entertaining and bittersweet memoir.

Mad Women is a tell-all account of life in the New York advertising world by Jane Maas, a copywriter who succeeded in the primarily male jungle depicted in the hit show Mad Men.  

Fans of the show are dying to know how accurate it is: was there really that much sex at the office? Were there really three-martini lunches? Were women really second-class citizens? Jane Maas says the answer to all three questions is unequivocally “yes.” Her book, based on her own experiences and countless interviews with her peers, gives the full stories, from the junior account man whose wife almost left him when she found the copy of Screw magazine he’d used to find “a date” for a client, to the Ogilvy & Mather’s annual Boat Ride, a sex-and-booze filled orgy, from which it was said no virgin ever returned intact. Wickedly funny and full of juicy inside information, Mad Women also tackles some of the tougher issues of the era, such as unequal pay, rampant, jaw-dropping sexism, and the difficult choice many women faced between motherhood and their careers.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:12:19 -0400)

(see all 2 descriptions)

"Mad Women is a tell-all account of life in the New York advertising world of the 1960s and 70s from Jane Maas, a female copywriter who succeeded in the primarily male environment portrayed by the hit TV show Mad Men. Fans of the show are dying to know how accurate it is: did people really have that much sex in the office? Were there really three-martini lunches? Were women really second-class citizens? Jane Maas says the answer to all three questions is unequivocally yes. And her book, based on her own experiences and countless interviews with her peers, gives the full stories, from the junior account man whose wife nearly left him when she found the copy of Screw magazine he'd used to find "entertainment" for a client, to the Ogilvy & Mather agency's legendary annual sex-and-booze filled Boat Ride, from which it was said no virgin ever returned intact. Wickedly funny and full of juicy inside information, Mad Women also tackles the tougher issues of the era, such as equal pay, rampant jaw-dropping sexism, and the difficult choice many women faced between motherhood and their careers"--… (more)

» see all 4 descriptions

Quick Links

Swap Ebooks Audio
20 wanted

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (3.69)
0.5
1
1.5
2
2.5
3 8
3.5 3
4 7
4.5
5 3

Tantor Media

An edition of this book was published by Tantor Media.

» Publisher information page

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

You are using the new servers! | About | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 117,016,227 books! | Top bar: Always visible