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Borderless Economics: Chinese Sea Turtles,…
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Borderless Economics: Chinese Sea Turtles, Indian Fridges and the New…

by Robert Guest

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Optimistic survey of the positive effects of globalization, be they economic or social or political. Closing you borders and foolish dreams of mercantilism or autarky will only hurt a nation and people in the long run. Freedom of information flow, combined with good government policy, will be a definite boon to any nations future. Compare Botswana and zimbabwe.

May be optimistic and almost cliched for some, but worth looking at nonetheless. ( )
  HadriantheBlind | Mar 30, 2013 |
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0230113826, Hardcover)

Acentury ago, migrants often crossed an ocean and never saw their homelands again. Today, they call - or Skype - home the moment their flight has landed, and that's just the beginning. Thanks to cheap travel and easy communication, immigrants everywhere stay in intimate contact with their native countries, creating powerful cross-border networks.

In Borderless Economics, Robert Guest, The Economist's Business Editor, travels through dozens of countries and 44 American states, observing how these networks create wealth, spread ideas and foster innovation. He shows how:
* Brainy Indians in America collaborate with brainy Indians in India to build $70 fridges and $300 houses
* Young Chinese study in the West and then return home (where they're known as "sea turtles"), infecting China with ideas that will eventually turn it democratic
* The so-called "brain drain" - the flow of educated migrants from poorcountries to rich ones - actually reduces global poverty
*America's unique ability to attract and absorb migrants lets it tap into the energy of all the world's diaspora networks. So despite its current woes, if the United States keeps its borders open, it will remain the world's most powerful nation indefinitely.
With on-the-ground reporting from Asia, Africa, Europe and even Idaho, this book examines how migration, for the all the disruption it causes, makes the world wealthier and happier.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:19:06 -0400)

(see all 2 descriptions)

"Today, thanks to the ease of technology and travel, we enjoy unprecendented levels of interconnectedness. Societies are increasingly mobile, and immigrant populations maintain strong ties with their native countries, allowing for an unbroken chain of innovation and knowledge that stretches all the way back home. Robert Guest, Global Business Editor for The Economist, shows how today's tribal networks transcend national borders, and how they are shaping the global community in unforeseen ways, including so-called "Chinese sea turtles"; young Chinese who come to the West for college before returning to China who eagerly absorb democratic ideals along with their technical training. Now, as they assume leadership positions in Chinese government and business, they will slowly turn China democratic. Brainy Indians in the United States collaborate with brainy Indians in India to build $70 refrigerators and $2,000 cars; their frugal innovations and managerial know-how are about to turn the global economy on its head. In a world where trade, trust, and information flow through ethnic networks, the nation that values open borders and encourages the growth of its diaspora populations will be the superpower of the twenty-first century. With on-the-ground reporting from dozens of countries, this is a timely look at the forces greater than national boundaries, and how they can be harnessed to move the whole planet forward"--… (more)

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