HomeGroupsTalkZeitgeist
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Pawnee hero stories and folk-tales; with…
Loading...

Pawnee hero stories and folk-tales; with notes on the origin, customs, and…

by George Bird Grinnell

Other authors: Maurice Frink (Introduction)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingConversations
55None214,390 (3.67)None

None.

None
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

No reviews
no reviews | add a review

» Add other authors (3 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
George Bird Grinnellprimary authorall editionscalculated
Frink, MauriceIntroductionsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Series (with order)
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
Quotations
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Publisher series
Original language

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English

None

Book description
Haiku summary

Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0803250800, Paperback)

In the late 1880s the ethnologist and writer George Bird Grinnell visited the Pawnee Agency in Indian Territory. To Eagle Chief, whom he had known for many years, he explained the object of his visit: "Father, we have come down here to . . . ask the people about how things used to be in the olden times, to hear their stories, to get their history, and then to put all these things down in a book." The chief meditated for a time and then said: "It is good and it is time. Already the old things are being lost, and those who know the secrets are many of them dead. . . . The old men told their grandchildren, and they told their grandchildren, and so the secrets and the stories and the doings of long ago have been handed down."

The result of Grinnell's field work was Pawnee Hero Stories and Folk-Tales, first published in 1899. Here are stories about a Pawnee youth who serves as a peacemaker and a warrior's quest for lost joy, and such tales as "The Dun Horse," "The Bear man," "The Snake Brother," and "The Ghost Wife." Extended notes describe the origins and migrations of the Pawnees, their customs, methods of warfare, and later history.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:10:22 -0400)

(see all 2 descriptions)

No library descriptions found.

Quick Links

Swap Ebooks Audio
5 pay

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (3.67)
0.5
1
1.5
2
2.5
3 2
3.5
4
4.5
5 1

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

You are using the new servers! | About | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 116,966,129 books! | Top bar: Always visible