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The Last Slayer by Nadia Lee
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The Last Slayer

by Nadia Lee

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The Last Slayer by Nadie Lee is a compelling exciting blend of fantasy, demonology and a touch of grit that will leave a readier craving more.

In the tones of Thea Harrison’s Elder Race and Richelle Mead’s Dark Swan Series, the Last Slayer delves into the mystics surrounding the omnipotence of the other races; specifically Dragons.

Ms. Lee’s universe explores the many facets of dragon society. Her vivid depiction of the tunneling worm dragons to the dive bombing wayvern are breathe taking.

As a heroine Ashera del Cid is one kick ass female, whose not afraid to play with the big boys and takes ever opportunity to best them at their own game. That is until her 27th birthday when everything changes. No longer the hunter, she now must face the prospect of being the hunted.
Although Ashera is the best hunters of night monster, succubus and incubi, she is vulnerable on so many levels. Her issues of abandonment and her insecurities about her appearance, have made her leery of any unsolicited make attention. Yet her attraction to Ramiel can not be ignores. Her realization of what some of her clients have experienced in the thrills of the succubus/incubus is very sobering.

Similarly to The Dark Swan series, Ramiel has his own agenda, that just happens to coincide with Ashera’s need to try and stay alive. He is sutle in his overtures to her, though there are some very delicious times when his feeling get the better of him.
The opening line of the book, “Here have some sex” at first is too startling to conceive. I actually laugh out loud at the entire concept of getting a magical power visit from bottled sex. Yet the intimate moments between Ashera and Ramiel are sweet, tender and erotic. All of which makes his demure very silmiliar to Dorian’s in the “the Iron crown, the thorn Quine and shadow hire. ( )
  TheiBookEmporium | May 21, 2014 |
At first, I thought THE LAST SLAYER was going to be my new favorite urban fantasy. Ten, fifteen, twenty percent of the way through the book, I was glued to the page, thrilled to my toes, ready to squeal with glee. I adored Ashera because she seemed to be effortlessly in control of her life, in peace with herself and her place with the world.

One of the first things we learn is that she's plain bordering on ugly, but she shrugs off the sting of being mocked for her looks by being a savvy and competent demon hunter. She's aware of her true value and secure in herself, so much so that she's got a great relationship with her very, very beautiful sister Valerie. Likewise, she's an orphan and foster child who was adopted into a very wealthy family where she was never quite treated as an equal. But she's grateful for the blessings she received - a fine education, for example - and not resentful about her lot in life.

Ashera balances corporate savvy with savage martial skills, and the first few scenes show us Ashera at her most competent. Overworked but sharp and snappy, she dives into a dangerous fight with a demon and comes out ahead. Things start to go wrong when the dragonlords arrive in town, supposedly for a meeting with a pharmaceutical company. Ashera attends as part of the security detail, but it soon becomes apparent that the dragonlords - powerful demigods - have their own agenda, and cooperating with the suits is not on their list. Actually, they're looking for Ashera.

Most of the stuff that happens after that point veers off into spoiler territory, so I can't go into specifics. Ramiel shows up, and Ashera's wishy-washy emotional monologues about him provide the first hint of where the book is headed. He helps her, but can she trust him? Is he interested in her as a person, or is he only helping her because he swore some sort of vow? Ashera changes her mind about him every chapter or so. Ramiel, for his part, is painfully consistent. He bends over backwards to protect Ashera, he offers her help and hospitality, but the second he's even the tiniest bit withholding or fails to lavish her with affection, she assumes he doesn't care about her and throws a tantrum. A tantrum! What happened to the kickass Ashera of yester-chapter?

In fact, the deeper we get into the book the less kickass demon-fighting action there is and the more long baths and wardrobe changes there are. It gets to the point where even Ashera thinks to herself, "Gee, I seem to be taking a lot of baths," and, oh-em-gee, that could pass for ironic understatement. She takes a bath at every single residence that she visits over the course of the novel, and at the really fancy palatial destinations, she takes several (to sample all the different tubs, I suppose). Once she dries off, she begrudgingly dons some sort of fabulous gown, grumbling all the while about how she's a slayer and doesn't care about such finery. It's around this time that she stops seeming like someone who can rise above her own plain looks and starts seeming really, really superficial. Once the quality that drew me to her the most corrodes into something so unattractive, I was done rooting for Ashera.

The story itself mostly amounts to Ramiel telling Ashera what she needs to do, and Ashera wavering a bit before she decides to follow instructions. Another thing that makes the formerly kickass heroine seem passive and weak.

By the end, this book that had me on the edge of my seat had turned into a chore. Not recommended. ( )
  MlleEhreen | Sep 20, 2013 |
Review posted at www.Thebookpushers.com

Ashera Del Cid is a demon hunter who works with her foster family’s company that defends humans against demon dream attacks. When Ashera deals with a case that quickly turns ugly she comes across the mysterious and seductive Ramiel who claims that he is there to help and guide her because she is no ordinary demon hunter, but is actually a Slayer and the last of of her kind. With her life thrown in disarray, she is drawn into a web of intrigue and warring dragon lord factions because of her mysterious origins which she discovers brings major revelations.

You have to love an opening of a book where the heroine has to drink an energetic drug potion called Sex (which doesn’t taste as delicious as it sounds) to get a boost of preternatural energy to battle demons. Ashera is a smart and independent heroine who has some great wise-cracking lines and kick ass scenes. Although she is wary to get to close to many people, because of being abandoned as a baby and thrust from foster home to foster home, she is close and loves her foster sister and foster father who are also her co-workers, but she has always felt like an outcast and an outsider.

The romantic subplot was also a real joy to read and I really loved Ramiel who I think was pretty sexy and charismatic and the scenes he shared with Ashera oozed with sexual tension. I especially loved their first love scene which was very sensual and the imagery depicted was imaginative and erotic. I really liked how their relationship progressed in the book which had its fair share of road-bumps and especially how it tied in with the development of Ashera’s character who undergoes a real metamorphosis throughout the book. I also felt that the romance evolved naturally with real tension but without any forced angst and I look forward to see how it develops in future books to see how it further develops.

I also really loved Nadia Lee use of mythology which was really vivid and full of rich details. The world she created of dragons and their dragon lords, and other demon beings was very memorable, and it had a dreamy descriptive feel. The different types of dragons such as the wyrms and wyverns in the action scenes was tense and creepy. But I have to say I really loved the tinker wyrm who plays a butler type role for the Dragon-Lords, and I especially loved Toshi, who was Ramiel’s servant who gave real splash of humour to the story who was pretty neurotic about his domestic duties for his master.

I wished there was more time spent on Ashera’s feelings towards some of the revelations she uncovers especially the scene that is integral about her mother. And I did feel the pace slowed in the middle of the book whilst the ending was rushed and a bit anti-climatic with the lead up to the big battle, although that final scene felt really epic in scope and filled with high octane action. But nonetheless, it was a fulfilling ending to a highly enjoyable book.

The Last Slayer is an imaginative and action packed Urban Fantasy that I immensely enjoyed with its premise of dream demons and dragon-lords. For a genre that I have been kind of burned out on the past year or so, it really felt refreshing from the all the usual vampires, werewolves and witches and tropes that is usually featured in Urban Fantasy. The underlying erotic tone also adds a touch of heat but doesn’t overpower the story or characters but really adds to the book. With an engaging wise-cracking heroine and a smouldering hero, and epic fantastical tone, I highly recommend The Last Slayer if you fancy something new. ( )
  Has_bookpusher | Sep 20, 2013 |
The story is good fun, although I found it a bit hard to follow in some places. The heroine complained about her looks a little too much, but that's the only complaint I have at the moment.

Look forward to reading more, seems like a fascinating universe. ( )
  snitchbitch | Sep 10, 2013 |
At first, I thought THE LAST SLAYER was going to be my new favorite urban fantasy. Ten, fifteen, twenty percent of the way through the book, I was glued to the page, thrilled to my toes, ready to squeal with glee. I adored Ashera because she seemed to be effortlessly in control of her life, in peace with herself and her place with the world.

One of the first things we learn is that she's plain bordering on ugly, but she shrugs off the sting of being mocked for her looks by being a savvy and competent demon hunter. She's aware of her true value and secure in herself, so much so that she's got a great relationship with her very, very beautiful sister Valerie. Likewise, she's an orphan and foster child who was adopted into a very wealthy family where she was never quite treated as an equal. But she's grateful for the blessings she received - a fine education, for example - and not resentful about her lot in life.

Ashera balances corporate savvy with savage martial skills, and the first few scenes show us Ashera at her most competent. Overworked but sharp and snappy, she dives into a dangerous fight with a demon and comes out ahead. Things start to go wrong when the dragonlords arrive in town, supposedly for a meeting with a pharmaceutical company. Ashera attends as part of the security detail, but it soon becomes apparent that the dragonlords - powerful demigods - have their own agenda, and cooperating with the suits is not on their list. Actually, they're looking for Ashera.

Most of the stuff that happens after that point veers off into spoiler territory, so I can't go into specifics. Ramiel shows up, and Ashera's wishy-washy emotional monologues about him provide the first hint of where the book is headed. He helps her, but can she trust him? Is he interested in her as a person, or is he only helping her because he swore some sort of vow? Ashera changes her mind about him every chapter or so. Ramiel, for his part, is painfully consistent. He bends over backwards to protect Ashera, he offers her help and hospitality, but the second he's even the tiniest bit withholding or fails to lavish her with affection, she assumes he doesn't care about her and throws a tantrum. A tantrum! What happened to the kickass Ashera of yester-chapter?

In fact, the deeper we get into the book the less kickass demon-fighting action there is and the more long baths and wardrobe changes there are. It gets to the point where even Ashera thinks to herself, "Gee, I seem to be taking a lot of baths," and, oh-em-gee, that could pass for ironic understatement. She takes a bath at every single residence that she visits over the course of the novel, and at the really fancy palatial destinations, she takes several (to sample all the different tubs, I suppose). Once she dries off, she begrudgingly dons some sort of fabulous gown, grumbling all the while about how she's a slayer and doesn't care about such finery. It's around this time that she stops seeming like someone who can rise above her own plain looks and starts seeming really, really superficial. Once the quality that drew me to her the most corrodes into something so unattractive, I was done rooting for Ashera.

The story itself mostly amounts to Ramiel telling Ashera what she needs to do, and Ashera wavering a bit before she decides to follow instructions. Another thing that makes the formerly kickass heroine seem passive and weak.

By the end, this book that had me on the edge of my seat had turned into a chore. Not recommended. ( )
  MlleEhreen | Apr 3, 2013 |
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Ashera del Cid is a talented demon hunter, but when she kills a demigod's pet dragon, the hunter becomes the hunted. Her only potential ally is Ramiel, a sexy-as-hell demon. Now the two must work together to battle dragons and demigods...and the chemistry crackling between them. Ramiel has his own reasons for offering Ashera his protection. He knows her true identity and the real reason the demigods want her dead. What he can't predict is how she'll react when she discovers he knew who she was all along.… (more)

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