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Nelle terre estreme by Jon Krakauer
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Nelle terre estreme (1996)

by Jon Krakauer, Laura Ferrari (Translator), Sabrina Zung (Translator)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingConversations / Mentions
11,691318227 (3.89)1 / 319
Member:Kua
Title:Nelle terre estreme
Authors:Jon Krakauer
Other authors:Laura Ferrari (Translator), Sabrina Zung (Translator)
Info:Corbaccio (2008), Hardcover, Exploits
Collections:Read, Your library, Read but unowned
Rating:****
Tags:Non-Fiction

Work details

Into the Wild by Jon Krakauer (1996)

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English (299)  Italian (5)  German (4)  Dutch (2)  Portuguese (Portugal) (2)  French (2)  Spanish (2)  Finnish (1)  Catalan (1)  All languages (318)
Showing 1-5 of 299 (next | show all)
Jon Krakauer is one of the best writers of nonfiction. He first proved that in magazines, but his books began with INTO THE WILD in 1996.

If you haven't read this book about Chris McCandless, who, at 24, tried to live in Alaska wilderness and failed, you may be under the impression that this is the story of that attempt. But too much is unknown because McCandless did it alone.

Instead, Krakauer tells us right away that McCandless lived for four months by himself in the Alaska wilderness and ended up starving to death. So that isn't a spoiler. The rest of the chapters are examinations of how McCandless came to be the type of person who would want to do this, of other people who were this way, of whether he had a death wish, of whether he was stupid or naive. Krakauer even puts himself in some chapters when he compares one of his own exploits to McCandless' and when he visits the old bus that McCandless lived in. Krakauer finally makes some conclusions about McCandless, some guesses based on the evidence he has laid out.

INTO THE WILD was a great beginning to a string of Krakauer's other books of nonfiction. Those, too, are at least as good, some even better. And, we can assume, more is to come. ( )
  techeditor | Feb 6, 2016 |
Great read, seems like you are joining him on his journey ( )
  jimifenway | Feb 2, 2016 |
Into the Wild by Jon Krakauer
3 stars

Chris McCandless didn't fit into the early 1990's society. He didn't want to go to college, but it was the only thing that he did that his parents told him to do that he actually did. Shortly after his graduation from an Atlanta university, Chris decided to hit the road and never look back. It was his graduation that granted him his freedom, from not only his parents but from society.

When I started reading this book, I didn't realize it was a nonfiction one, not until I finished and got to the acknowledgements at the end where the author thanked the family of Chris. I was thoroughly shocked. I've heard stories of people living off the land for years. I could actually relate to Chris at times. I don't feel like I don't fit in with society now, I'm not into clothes or politics or much anything really, except reading. I would love to just pick up my life and move to Alaska and just live my life, not worry about where I have to be and work.

I would have to say that this book is for anyone that enjoys true stories. It didn't read like a traditional nonfiction and I think that was why I didn't pick up on it. I liked it overall. ( )
  alwelker | Jan 25, 2016 |
Into the Wild by Jon Krakauer
3 stars

Chris McCandless didn't fit into the early 1990's society. He didn't want to go to college, but it was the only thing that he did that his parents told him to do that he actually did. Shortly after his graduation from an Atlanta university, Chris decided to hit the road and never look back. It was his graduation that granted him his freedom, from not only his parents but from society.

When I started reading this book, I didn't realize it was a nonfiction one, not until I finished and got to the acknowledgements at the end where the author thanked the family of Chris. I was thoroughly shocked. I've heard stories of people living off the land for years. I could actually relate to Chris at times. I don't feel like I don't fit in with society now, I'm not into clothes or politics or much anything really, except reading. I would love to just pick up my life and move to Alaska and just live my life, not worry about where I have to be and work.

I would have to say that this book is for anyone that enjoys true stories. It didn't read like a traditional nonfiction and I think that was why I didn't pick up on it. I liked it overall. ( )
  alwelker | Jan 25, 2016 |
This would not be the best first book to read from Krakauer. The book centers on one man, McCandless, who chooses to live alone in the wild. It follows his movement across the country from one local to another eventually ending in Alaska.

I got the feeling as I read it that Krakauer didn't quite have enough for a full book and he stretched it out some. I would have been more satisfied if it were shorter.

This is one of the very few times I'll every write or say that the MOVIE IS BETTER THAN THE BOOK. The movie is succinct, captures the text perfectly, and comes in at two hours. very little is lost in translation from text to screen. ( )
  RalphLagana | Jan 23, 2016 |
Showing 1-5 of 299 (next | show all)
Christopher McCandless's life and his death may have been meaningless, absurd, even reprehensible, but by the end of "Into the Wild," you care for him deeply.
 
Mr. Krakauer has taken the tale of a kook who went into the woods, and made of it a heart-rending drama of human yearning.
 

» Add other authors (28 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Krakauer, Jonprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Ferrari, LauraTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Franklin, PhilipNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Mijn, Aad van derTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Palma, Maria HelenaTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Soares, Pedro MaiaTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Zung, SabrinaTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Jim Gallien had driven four miles out of Fairbanks when he spotted the hitchhiker standing in the snow beside the road, thumb raised high, shivering in the gray Alaska dawn.
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The very basic core of a man's living spirit is his passion for adventure. The joy of life comes from our encounters with new experiences, and hence there is no greater joy than to have an endlessly changing horizon, for each day to have a new and different sun.
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
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Amazon.com Amazon.com Review (ISBN 0307387178, Paperback)

What would possess a gifted young man recently graduated from college to literally walk away from his life? Noted outdoor writer and mountaineer Jon Krakauer tackles that question in his reporting on Chris McCandless, whose emaciated body was found in an abandoned bus in the Alaskan wilderness in 1992.

Described by friends and relatives as smart, literate, compassionate, and funny, did McCandless simply read too much Thoreau and Jack London and lose sight of the dangers of heading into the wilderness alone? Krakauer, whose own adventures have taken him to the perilous heights of Everest, provides some answers by exploring the pull the outdoors, seductive yet often dangerous, has had on his own life.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:16:52 -0400)

(see all 7 descriptions)

A portrait of Chris McCandless chronicles his decision to withdraw from society and adopt the persona of Alexander Supertramp, offering insight into his beliefs about the wilderness and his tragic death in the Alaskan wilderness.

(summary from another edition)

» see all 11 descriptions

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