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Speechless by Hannah Harrington
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Speechless (edition 2012)

by Hannah Harrington

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1873863,175 (4.04)None
Member:skullduggery
Title:Speechless
Authors:Hannah Harrington
Info:MIRA Ink (2012), Kindle Edition, 288 pages
Collections:Digital Library, Middle Grade & Teens
Rating:****
Tags:@ebook, fiction, young adult, contemporary fiction, school days

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Speechless by Hannah Harrington

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A really interesting story about a girl who can't keep a secret, and how this flaw in her yielded disastrous results - and how she redeemed herself. Chelsea Knot is your average popular, unlikeable character in the beginning in the story, and yes I'll admit I thought she was quite unbearable for a while into the story. Although she does feel bad for what happened, she is more upset by the fact that she's lost her popular (and mean and shallow and horrible) friends. She only cares about how her actions have affected her, not the people around her.

But then, slowly, cautiously, we see her character develop. Not all at once (which would have been unbelievable) but by degrees, through her non-speaking pledge and with the help of her new friends who really help her to put things in perspective. I was also pleasantly surprised how she used her first words again and was extremely glad they weren't spoken lightly. It is here it was really apparent to me how Chelsea changed and developed, she was able to do something she was always too scared to.

Another great novel from Hannah Harrington, after Saving June and Speechless, I'm definitely looking forward to another! ( )
  crashmyparty | May 14, 2014 |
After reading this, I definitely think that I may have reached the stage where I am too old for some books in the young adult genre; Speechless being one of those said books.

I loved that this was a huge platform for homosexuality, anti-bullying and acceptance but it was aimed at a much younger audience than myself. I think that is why this book didn't get a higher rating - the concept was good but I felt that it was weighed down by all of the teenage angst. A bit cliche but had the makings of your A typical YA novel.

One thing that irked me the most were all the misspelt words - Jackson Pollock is spelt like that, okay? :) ( )
  LaurenKathryn | Mar 31, 2014 |
Speechless Chelsea Knot is the best friend of the most popular girl at school and is known for her ability to ferret out, and expose, the good gossip. When she spills a secret that has violent repercussions, Chelsea makes a decision to do the right thing even if it means losing that all-important popularity. Suddenly, she's on the outside and getting back all that she's dished out in the past and then some. An article she reads in the National Geographic inspires her to take a vow of silence since talking without thinking has gotten her into this mess. The beginning of Speechless was very slow and angst filled. The characters were all largely unlikable, a bunch of selfish, shallow teens with entitlement issues. I couldn't stand Chelsea and didn't feel particularly sorry for the position she found herself in. I even thought about marking this DNF and moving on to something else. I'm really glad that I didn't though, because as the story progressed, it slowly became more than it first appeared. The vow of silence she took seemed to be for selfish attention seeking reasons initially, but the unforeseen result of not speaking allows her to really examine the person that she is as well as the people and things she had surrounded herself with. Her silence also caused her to listen more fully to what people where saying and to consider their words instead of simply replying. Through her vow, she learns about friendship, accountability, loyalty, and the power of words. Her character grows very slowly throughout the story as she acknowledges some hard truths about herself and attempts to become worthy of the new friends she's made and, of course, the boy. There's always a boy... :) No flowery prose or layers of meaning, the writing was as simple and straightforward as the story itself and felt authentic and perceptive. I enjoyed Speechless much more than I thought I would after reading the first couple chapters and encourage anyone who chooses to read this to push through that initial reaction to these characters because the book does get much much better. ( )
  ahappybooker | Feb 7, 2014 |
Speechless Chelsea Knot is the best friend of the most popular girl at school and is known for her ability to ferret out, and expose, the good gossip. When she spills a secret that has violent repercussions, Chelsea makes a decision to do the right thing even if it means losing that all-important popularity. Suddenly, she's on the outside and getting back all that she's dished out in the past and then some. An article she reads in the National Geographic inspires her to take a vow of silence since talking without thinking has gotten her into this mess. The beginning of Speechless was very slow and angst filled. The characters were all largely unlikable, a bunch of selfish, shallow teens with entitlement issues. I couldn't stand Chelsea and didn't feel particularly sorry for the position she found herself in. I even thought about marking this DNF and moving on to something else. I'm really glad that I didn't though, because as the story progressed, it slowly became more than it first appeared. The vow of silence she took seemed to be for selfish attention seeking reasons initially, but the unforeseen result of not speaking allows her to really examine the person that she is as well as the people and things she had surrounded herself with. Her silence also caused her to listen more fully to what people where saying and to consider their words instead of simply replying. Through her vow, she learns about friendship, accountability, loyalty, and the power of words. Her character grows very slowly throughout the story as she acknowledges some hard truths about herself and attempts to become worthy of the new friends she's made and, of course, the boy. There's always a boy... :) No flowery prose or layers of meaning, the writing was as simple and straightforward as the story itself and felt authentic and perceptive. I enjoyed Speechless much more than I thought I would after reading the first couple chapters and encourage anyone who chooses to read this to push through that initial reaction to these characters because the book does get much much better. ( )
  ahappybooker | Feb 7, 2014 |
Find this review and more at http://www.thereadingobsession.blogpsot.com

I think I'll start this review saying that Speechless left me speechless. I'm pretty sure I just lost half my friends by that horrible pun, but it's true. It's brilliant, and I'm sure it'll be a favorite of many people, but after reading The Sea of Tranquility, this pales in comparison.

Everyone knows a person like Chelsea. She's that person that, no matter what, cannot keep a secret. Usually, she's best friends with one of the most popular people, possibly for that reason.

One night, at a party, she sees two guys getting together, and comes downstairs and tells everyone. One of them gets beat up so severely that he goes into a coma. When Chelsea finds out about this, she tells her parents, and that's the last thing she says for a while. After this, she becomes a pariah, and everyone stays away from her.

In the beginning, Chelsea isn't likeable. In fact, I hated her with a passion. But then, she went through a magical thing called character development. Hear that, other YA books? Character development. Where a character actually changes into a better person.

Even though I didn't like Chelsea at first, she was still relatable, and she stayed relatable throughout the book.

Though Speechless is very easy to read, it deals with very dark issues, and it deals with them well.

I recommend this for people who want something that deals with LGBT acceptance in a light-hearted way. ( )
  AlisaK. | Oct 5, 2013 |
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After her behavior causes her to lose her popular friends and results in one person being hospitalized, Chelsea takes a vow of silence.

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