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Crewel (Crewel World) by Gennifer Albin
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Crewel (Crewel World) (edition 2012)

by Gennifer Albin

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
358None31,237 (3.58)9
Member:AaIshah
Title:Crewel (Crewel World)
Authors:Gennifer Albin
Info:Farrar, Straus and Giroux (BYR) (2012), Hardcover, 368 pages
Collections:Your library
Rating:****
Tags:None

Work details

Crewel by Gennifer Albin

  1. 00
    The Handmaid’s Tale by Margaret Atwood (StefanieGeeks)
    StefanieGeeks: female roles, feminist allegory, patriarchal society, dystopia.
  2. 00
    Across the Universe by Beth Revis (StefanieGeeks)
    StefanieGeeks: post-apocolyptic, isolation dystopia, romance, earth-like world, government conspiracy, teen series.
  3. 00
    Gathering Blue by Lois Lowry (Jthierer)
    Jthierer: Similar theme of a girl's talent for weaving singling her out in a dystopian society.
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» See also 9 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 58 (next | show all)
Wow, what an extraordinary read! This is totally one of those books you will never will be able to put down! Okay, I thought this would be an easy review to write since I loved it so much. Right now thats working against me because all I want to do is gush over Crewel. Crewel= Masterpiece

The characters are memorable and real. Jost, Adelice, Eric, and other characters, I swear, broke into my room last night. They talked to me and I saw them clear as day. (Maybe I am exaggerating a bit.) But, my point is, the characters were so vivid! Characters always make or break a book for me, and these wonderful characters got a big O on the "Make the reader care" O.W.Ls. My heart ached for each of them and everything they had to go through.

The world in Crewel was...well... utterly breathtaking. One of those settings that transport you to wherever the main character is. Albin is a author to envy for her amazing skills. Also, as you learn about the Spinsters and how they are controlled, you get mad. Scarily (and embarrassingly) mad for the world being total fiction.

The reader can tell the author put a lot of thought into this book. The ideas are complete and unique. Crewel was so not hastily thrown together. Everything needed is included, and in wonderful ways that suck you into the story.

This is now one of my favorite Dystopians. I am not always a big fan of the genre, but this one was 100% amazing. It is not a carbon copy of Hunger Games, or even Matched. Thank you Albin! Crewel stands out. Definitely.

Overall, I loveloveloved Crewel. I recommend this to readers looking for beautiful writing, vivid characters, and original ideas.

5/5 bookcases

Side note- Weaving time? Pulled off wonderfully! ( )
  Emily_Anne | Mar 16, 2014 |
I’m terrible with books sometimes: I’ve fallen in love with some pretty obscure titles (one of my favorite books is The Basic Eight by Daniel Handler; please tell me if you know it), but sometimes I don’t hear of popular ones until they’re everywhere. And, as sheepish as I am to admit it, I hadn’t heard of Crewel before when I won a copy in a giveaway hosted by A.T. O’Connor on her blog, Whispering Minds. As soon as I saw the cover, though, I had a feeling I was going to like this one. I get like that with covers sometimes. It’s like love at first sight. (Of course, there are times when my first impression is terribly, terribly wrong, but usually I’m pretty good about it.)

Here’s my only real complaint about Crewel: the description doesn’t give the book justice. It makes it sound like the entire story revolves around the last hour that Adelice has before the Guild comes to get her, and there’s so much more than that. (Also, it makes it sound like she actually escapes, so I was bewildered when the Guild swoops in and completely upends her life.)

Other than that, no complaints, really. I couldn’t stop reading this book. The idea of a world where environment and events are part of a carefully woven tapestry was new and interesting. (Well, new if you don’t think about the Fates. But this interpretation still struck me as pretty fresh.) The world of Spinsters (girls selected for their above-average ability to work the looms and weave — quite literally — the fabric of society) is one of glamour, as long as you don’t think too hard about what it is they’re doing…especially when it comes time to rip a thread. (Or, in not-so-subtle terms, end a life.) The amount of power held by these women is envious to some and terrifying to others, and I enjoyed watching the power plays in action. Like so many recent YA titles, there’s a love triangle, but it’s not terribly distracting. The world is well crafted and well explained, and I really enjoyed reading this.

All in all: Worth reading, particularly if you enjoy dystopian novels. However, I recently finished Altered, book two in the series, and I don’t think it held up to the promise of Crewel. So if you’re looking for a consistently strong series, maybe search elsewhere. (Altered isn’t bad, just…it didn’t excite me the way the first installment did.) ( )
  KellyWoodward | Feb 17, 2014 |
Crewel takes place in a futuristic society where people and events are woven with strands of time by Spinsters. Spinsters are generally girls chosen by their talent at weaving by the Guild in Arras. These girls are taken from their homes and families and then reside within the Guild where they practice weaving time with matter. Everything in Arras is controlled by the Guild through the spinsters such as harvesting food, childbirth, and even when and how someone dies.

Adelice is unique in Arras society in that she is able to weave the strands of time without a loom. From when, as a child, she first discovers this ability, Adelice’s parents work fervently to teach her how to cover it up so that she is not selected by the Guild who they do not trust. When, at her testing, she is among those chosen to be come a spinster, and is singled out among the others at the Guild, Adelice finds herself not knowing who she can trust.

The audio was read by Amanda Dolan who does a fairly good job narrating this rather tedious story. At times I thought she may have went a little overboard making some of the characters sound patronizing and condescending, but for the most part I enjoyed her narration.

While Crewel certainly has an original storyline even for a dystopian, there was far too much of the society that simply pushed the bounds of believability to far for me. For example, if Adelice and the other spinsters were controlled by this sinister Guild, why didn’t they just weave things differently? It was made very clear in the story that the spinsters were the only ones powerful enough to control their reality, I don’t understand the power this Guild had over the spinsters. Also, Adelice experiences some traumatic events very early on in the story, but she seems to just kind of accept them without much emotional impact and goes about her business. She put much more thought and energy into the awkwardly contrived love triangle than she did into events that would have devastated the average teen. But then Adelice is also exceptional in EVERY way, which was yet another issue I had with the book.

For the most part, I enjoyed the writing style. I didn’t have to struggle through the audio and finished fairly quickly for a 10 hour audio. But for me, the characters were flat and lacked authenticity and the world building was confusing and left more questions than answers. The sudden ending left me feeling a bit perplexed. It just sort of cut off without any resolution at all. It wasn’t so much a cliffhanger as it simply felt unfinished.

While Crewel just wasn’t for me, there are many people who really enjoyed it. Check out Sam’s review at Realm of Fiction for another perspective. ( )
  ahappybooker | Feb 7, 2014 |
Crewel takes place in a futuristic society where people and events are woven with strands of time by Spinsters. Spinsters are generally girls chosen by their talent at weaving by the Guild in Arras. These girls are taken from their homes and families and then reside within the Guild where they practice weaving time with matter. Everything in Arras is controlled by the Guild through the spinsters such as harvesting food, childbirth, and even when and how someone dies.

Adelice is unique in Arras society in that she is able to weave the strands of time without a loom. From when, as a child, she first discovers this ability, Adelice’s parents work fervently to teach her how to cover it up so that she is not selected by the Guild who they do not trust. When, at her testing, she is among those chosen to be come a spinster, and is singled out among the others at the Guild, Adelice finds herself not knowing who she can trust.

The audio was read by Amanda Dolan who does a fairly good job narrating this rather tedious story. At times I thought she may have went a little overboard making some of the characters sound patronizing and condescending, but for the most part I enjoyed her narration.

While Crewel certainly has an original storyline even for a dystopian, there was far too much of the society that simply pushed the bounds of believability to far for me. For example, if Adelice and the other spinsters were controlled by this sinister Guild, why didn’t they just weave things differently? It was made very clear in the story that the spinsters were the only ones powerful enough to control their reality, I don’t understand the power this Guild had over the spinsters. Also, Adelice experiences some traumatic events very early on in the story, but she seems to just kind of accept them without much emotional impact and goes about her business. She put much more thought and energy into the awkwardly contrived love triangle than she did into events that would have devastated the average teen. But then Adelice is also exceptional in EVERY way, which was yet another issue I had with the book.

For the most part, I enjoyed the writing style. I didn’t have to struggle through the audio and finished fairly quickly for a 10 hour audio. But for me, the characters were flat and lacked authenticity and the world building was confusing and left more questions than answers. The sudden ending left me feeling a bit perplexed. It just sort of cut off without any resolution at all. It wasn’t so much a cliffhanger as it simply felt unfinished.

While Crewel just wasn’t for me, there are many people who really enjoyed it. Check out Sam’s review at Realm of Fiction for another perspective. ( )
  ahappybooker | Feb 7, 2014 |
Originally Reviewed At: Mother/Gamer/Writer
Rating: 5 out of 5 Controllers
Review Source: Purchased/Audiobook
Reviewer:Me



Crewel is unique, strange, and a lyrical masterpiece. I plummeted head-over-feet in love with the novel the moment the audio began. I always find it surreal when a novel can magically transport you to another world, while leaving you breathlessly wanting, craving, and begging for more. Crewel by far is one of the most creative visionary experiences I’ve had this year and I am looking forward – with Epically bated breath – for the remainder of the novels in the series.



Crewel is a magnificent fantasy, for those of you who are able to suspend disbelief and thrust yourself deep within its pages. Our story is centered around sixteen year-old Adelice Lewys, a young girl who has been hiding a very special gift. All her life Adelice has been avoiding her destiny as a Spinster, a girl who can weave time with matter. She suppressed her gifts in order to stay with her family, to keep her life happy and normal. However, in an extremely twisted turn of events – which inevitably ends in bloodshed, Adelice is discovered, yanked from her home, and forced into the Spinster life.



But, is being a Spinster really so bad? Elegant parties, fancy clothes, exotic foods. For Adelice, it’s a drastic change, a change which part of her surprisingly enjoys. Although our main character is falling under the Spinster spell, she is still able to fight most of her desires and remain the same spitfire, sarcastic, nonconforming girl throughout most of the story. I loved Adelice! It was so easy to follow her thought process and when she was angry, I was angry. And when she was sad…well, I was still angry. LOL. She is the perfect combination of strong-willed and vulnerable. As each new piece of the Spinster puzzle is revealed, Adelice is tested, so much so it’s hard to believe she will survive. And when you finally make it to the last page, you will probably be pulling your hair out, angry, terrified, and most of all excited to see where her story will go next.



Overall, Crewel is a smash hit! The audiobook is fantastic and well worth your 1 credit at audible. I highly recommend this heart-pounding/heartbreaking read to teens and adults alike, those who enjoy fantasies, and those who crave strong female characters who don’t always have it easy. It’s an endearing tale I guarantee with stay with you long after the story is over. ( )
  momgamerwriter | Feb 6, 2014 |
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To Robin, who demanded I write a book, and to Josh, who made it happen
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They came in the night.
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
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Gifted with the unusual ability to embroider the very fabric of life, sixteen-year-old Adelice is summoned by Manipulation Services to become a Spinster, a move that will separate her from her beloved family and home forever.

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