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Crewel (Crewel World) by Gennifer Albin
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Crewel (Crewel World) (edition 2012)

by Gennifer Albin

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4246624,938 (3.58)12
Member:mckait
Title:Crewel (Crewel World)
Authors:Gennifer Albin
Info:Farrar, Straus and Giroux (BYR) (2012), Hardcover, 368 pages
Collections:Your library
Rating:****1/2
Tags:None

Work details

Crewel by Gennifer Albin

  1. 00
    The Handmaid's Tale by Margaret Atwood (StefanieGeeks)
    StefanieGeeks: female roles, feminist allegory, patriarchal society, dystopia.
  2. 00
    Across the Universe by Beth Revis (StefanieGeeks)
    StefanieGeeks: post-apocolyptic, isolation dystopia, romance, earth-like world, government conspiracy, teen series.
  3. 00
    Gathering Blue by Lois Lowry (Jthierer)
    Jthierer: Similar theme of a girl's talent for weaving singling her out in a dystopian society.
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» See also 12 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 66 (next | show all)
I won a copy of this book in a Shelf Awareness giveaway what seems like a very, very long time ago. I saw so many people reading it an I wanted to see what it was all about, so I had entered. And it has sat on my shelf ever since. So when it came time to choose my books for Bout of Books and the Book BFFs group decided to set group goals, I felt it fitting to choose this as my "procrastinated read."

I have very mixed feelings about the book. The concept seemed interesting enough, and something still tugs at my memory relating back to mythology. But I just can't place it.

I did have a chuckle at the women who did the weaving being called Spinsters, and that they were women who could never marry, et cetera. The irony of the choice of words amused me greatly.

But to me it felt as though there was something missing from the story. While I didn't dislike it, per se, I didn't really love it either. There was no real action to the story until toward the very end, and then the story ends and you are left wondering what is happening. I will likely read the sequel when it comes out in October if my library has it, but I am not sure if I will rush out to buy it, like I had hoped I would feel like doing.

It is not that often that I feel ambiguous about a book, and it makes me a little sad, but there it is.

The characters were moderately interesting, at least some of them, but others really just irked and annoyed me. The story itself, while well written, just felt flat and like it was missing something vitally important. It was just an okay read for me. ( )
  destinyisntfree | Feb 28, 2015 |
I won a copy of this book in a Shelf Awareness giveaway what seems like a very, very long time ago. I saw so many people reading it an I wanted to see what it was all about, so I had entered. And it has sat on my shelf ever since. So when it came time to choose my books for Bout of Books and the Book BFFs group decided to set group goals, I felt it fitting to choose this as my "procrastinated read."

I have very mixed feelings about the book. The concept seemed interesting enough, and something still tugs at my memory relating back to mythology. But I just can't place it.

I did have a chuckle at the women who did the weaving being called Spinsters, and that they were women who could never marry, et cetera. The irony of the choice of words amused me greatly.

But to me it felt as though there was something missing from the story. While I didn't dislike it, per se, I didn't really love it either. There was no real action to the story until toward the very end, and then the story ends and you are left wondering what is happening. I will likely read the sequel when it comes out in October if my library has it, but I am not sure if I will rush out to buy it, like I had hoped I would feel like doing.

It is not that often that I feel ambiguous about a book, and it makes me a little sad, but there it is.

The characters were moderately interesting, at least some of them, but others really just irked and annoyed me. The story itself, while well written, just felt flat and like it was missing something vitally important. It was just an okay read for me. ( )
  destinyisntfree | Feb 28, 2015 |
A different take on the dystopian novel. This book introduces us to a world of magic and time-weaving, but the governmental influences should feel familiar to dystopian book lovers.
  BookinghamPalace | Feb 28, 2015 |
AUTHOR: ALBIN, Gennifer
TITLE: Crewel
DATE READ: 01/05/15
RATING: 4/B
GENRE/PUB DATE/PUBLISHER/# OF PGS YA/2012/Farrar Straus Giroux/357 pgs
SERIES/STAND-ALONE: #1 Crewel World
TIME/PLACE: Future/Arras (world created beyond earth)
CHARACTERS: Adelice, Jost, Eric
FIRST LINES: I can count the days until summer draws to a close and autumn seeps into the leaves, painting them ginger & scarlet.
COMMENTS: Arras is a controlled world where everything is pre-determined: what you eat, where you live, how many children you have and when you will die. Any deviance will cause a re-mapping or removal. This world is all about control and The Manipulation Services consists of spinsters who work the looms that control the fabric of the inhabitants lives. There are certain young women that are gifted and chosen for this life as a spinster. Adelice is born into a family that knows her gift goes beyond someone who can work the loom and has extra special gifts that allow her to weave w/o artifice and no loom is required. Her parents try to protect her from being called as a spinster but they are thwarted and Adelice is taken. Most young women that try to run from the spinsters are removed but Adelice's gifts are too precious to waste, especially since the current creweler had been renewed many times and is ready for the end, Adelice seems to the her replacement. Adelice is forcibly removed from her family and believes are parents are gone but finds out her sister has been re-mapped. She no longer recognizes Adelice since she has new memories and a new family. Adelice is too independent to accept this new life that she has entered and joins forces w/ 2 young men Eric and Jost. She is not sure how or where but her plan is leave Arras and begin to live somewhere else -- Most of the inhabitants of Arras think this is the only world left that Earth had been destroyed years ago. It is not enough to just flee but to save her friends and family as well … so will have to read the next book to find out what progress is made since Book One ends just as they are touching down on earth. ( )
  pammykn | Feb 9, 2015 |
I am surprised by how much I loved this book. My expectations were not set too high, although they weren’t set too low either. I skimmed over a few reviews and decided to give it a go (it helped that I caught it so cheap on Book Outlet). And let it be known, I hate that I didn’t discover and read this book much sooner than I did. I’ve really been missing out on a lot of good books like Crewel, apparently.

I don’t find too many series that I actually like enough to follow. Sure, I’ll read the first book of a series and maybe like it, but more often than not I usually move on and just not bother picking up the second or third book. BUT, a really big but, I’m thrilled with Crewel and am currently, desperately glancing at the second book as I type. My curiosity has been caught.

Crewel is no simple tale. It’s so different, in the good way. There are the usual things, of course, like the sorta love triangle, guy-in-love-with-practically-a-stranger-mc, and the ‘specialness’ of Adelice. I could overlook them because the actual story is front and center, most importantly interesting and fresh.

I can’t do this book justice, but I can’t seem to write a clear review when I really like a book. So if you haven’t read Crewel, consider adding it to your to-read list. ( )
  CinaChilders | Jan 8, 2015 |
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To Robin, who demanded I write a book, and to Josh, who made it happen
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They came in the night.
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
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Gifted with the unusual ability to embroider the very fabric of life, sixteen-year-old Adelice is summoned by Manipulation Services to become a Spinster, a move that will separate her from her beloved family and home forever.

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