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Lies, Knives, and Girls in Red Dresses by…
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Lies, Knives, and Girls in Red Dresses

by Ron Koertge

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Showing 1-5 of 24 (next | show all)
This was a dark and edgy reimaging of 20 classic fairy tales. Told in free verse the author tries to use humor and a modern voice to intrigue readers. The book started off great with The Stepsisters, which was a retelling of Cinderella from the stepsister’s perspective. They are the abused siblings of a cunning and unruly Cinderella. I also enjoyed the twist on The Emperor’s New Clothes. The stories were short, which made for an easy read. Using silhouettes to illustrate the stories was really moving, they were both gritty and terrifying and the highlight of the book.

However, the majority of the stories were a bit lazy and confused. I wasn’t sure if it was because I wasn’t overly familiar with the original stories, but with several of the stories I just missed the point. I felt like there isn’t an audience for this book. A lot of the descriptive content was mature for young teen readers, but the voice was too youthful for an adult reader. The author left me a bit angry too. For example, in referring to the Woodsmen, Red Riding Hood stated "it's kind of, like, gay because as far as accessories go, scissors don't fit with the flannel shirt." It was phrasing like this that made me think the author was not in touch with the audience, he may have thought this was edgy for teens, but in fact it is just obnoxious. Teens want realistic content, not what someone thinks is realistic. Maybe other options will differ from mine… ( )
  clockwork_serenity | Jan 23, 2016 |
This was a dark and edgy reimaging of 20 classic fairy tales. Told in free verse the author tries to use humor and a modern voice to intrigue readers. The book started off great with The Stepsisters, which was a retelling of Cinderella from the stepsister’s perspective. They are the abused siblings of a cunning and unruly Cinderella. I also enjoyed the twist on The Emperor’s New Clothes. The stories were short, which made for an easy read. Using silhouettes to illustrate the stories was really moving, they were both gritty and terrifying and the highlight of the book.

However, the majority of the stories were a bit lazy and confused. I wasn’t sure if it was because I wasn’t overly familiar with the original stories, but with several of the stories I just missed the point. I felt like there isn’t an audience for this book. A lot of the descriptive content was mature for young teen readers, but the voice was too youthful for an adult reader. The author left me a bit angry too. For example, in referring to the Woodsmen, Red Riding Hood stated "it's kind of, like, gay because as far as accessories go, scissors don't fit with the flannel shirt." It was phrasing like this that made me think the author was not in touch with the audience, he may have thought this was edgy for teens, but in fact it is just obnoxious. Teens want realistic content, not what someone thinks is realistic. Maybe other options will differ from mine… ( )
  clockwork_serenity | Jan 23, 2016 |
This was a dark and edgy reimaging of 20 classic fairy tales. Told in free verse the author tries to use humor and a modern voice to intrigue readers. The book started off great with The Stepsisters, which was a retelling of Cinderella from the stepsister’s perspective. They are the abused siblings of a cunning and unruly Cinderella. I also enjoyed the twist on The Emperor’s New Clothes. The stories were short, which made for an easy read. Using silhouettes to illustrate the stories was really moving, they were both gritty and terrifying and the highlight of the book.

However, the majority of the stories were a bit lazy and confused. I wasn’t sure if it was because I wasn’t overly familiar with the original stories, but with several of the stories I just missed the point. I felt like there isn’t an audience for this book. A lot of the descriptive content was mature for young teen readers, but the voice was too youthful for an adult reader. The author left me a bit angry too. For example, in referring to the Woodsmen, Red Riding Hood stated "it's kind of, like, gay because as far as accessories go, scissors don't fit with the flannel shirt." It was phrasing like this that made me think the author was not in touch with the audience, he may have thought this was edgy for teens, but in fact it is just obnoxious. Teens want realistic content, not what someone thinks is realistic. Maybe other options will differ from mine… ( )
  clockwork_serenity | Jan 23, 2016 |
Disturbing, yet amusing. ( )
  keindi | Jan 23, 2016 |
This was heavily cliched and trite. Really terrible writing at points. I'm disappointed. ( )
  librarycatnip | Jan 12, 2015 |
Showing 1-5 of 24 (next | show all)
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0763644064, Hardcover)

Writing in free verse honed to a wicked edge, the incomparable Ron Koertge brings dark and contemporary humor to twenty iconic fairy tales.

Once upon a time, there was a strung-out match girl who sold CDs to stoners. Twelve impetuous sisters escaped King Daddy’s clutches to jiggle and cavort and wear out their shoes. A fickle Thumbelina searched for a tiny husband, leaving bodies in her wake. And Little Red Riding Hood confessed that she kind of wanted to know what it’s like to be swallowed whole. From bloodied and blinded stepsisters (they were duped) to a chopped-off finger flying into a heroine’s cleavage, this is fairy tale world turned upside down. Ron Koertge knows what really happened to all those wolves and maidens, ogres and orphans, kings and piglets, and he knows about the Ever After. So come closer
— he wants to whisper in your ear.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:18:33 -0400)

Free-verse reveals true stories behind well-known fairy tales, some reset in modern times, as a strung-out match girl sells CDs to drug users, Little Red Riding Hood admits that she wanted to know what it is like to be swallowed whole, and Cinderella's stepsisters are duped.… (more)

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