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The Vietnam War and American Culture (Social…
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The Vietnam War and American Culture (Social Foundations of Aesthetic…

by John Carlos Rowe

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Recently added byPhillatius, LamSon
culture (1) NF (1) non-fiction (1) USA (1) Vietnam (2) Vietnam War (1) war (1)

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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 023106733X, Paperback)

War veterans, journalists, poets and professors have contributed to this study which describes how US culture represented and continues to represent the Vietnam War on television, in newspapers, in military propaganda films, novels, plays and music.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:24:03 -0400)

Although most of the essays in this collection refer to literary works, their primary concerns are not literary. All the contributors to this volume understand that literary responses to the war constitute only a small part of American culture's massive effort over the past quarter century to "cover the war." We think that the Vietnam War and its reception have decisively changed familiar notions of literature's role as social criticism. Of course, it was not just the "war" in some narrowly understood sense that brought about such changes in literature's critical function, but the cultural, political, and economic forces that led us into war. And it was not due simply to the fact that the Vietnam War was a "television" war that literature seems to have lost some of its authority to criticize our social history.… (more)

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