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The Woman's Way by Charles Garvice
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The Woman's Way (1914)

by Charles Garvice

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Celia Grant, a lady fallen on hard times, lives in a grotty apartment building in London, supporting herself financially. One day she happens upon the young man in the adjoining room contemplating suicide, and saves his life, which he never forgets:
'I did not know her name until you told me just now; I saw her for only a few minutes; those few minutes, and her angelic goodness, changed the whole current of my life.'
Adventures abound in this highly implausible novel: (spoiler alert) - expect stolen diamonds, long-lost relatives, crazy co-incidences, a circus, an unmarried mother and much confusion... But all comes good in the end.

I had never heard of Charles Garvice till I read Arnold Bennett's excellent 'Riceyman Steps', set in a second-hand bookshop just after WW1, where Garvice's works are mentioned more than once: 'popular modern novels, such as those of Ethel M Dell, Charles Garvice, Zane Grey...' I have since learned that he was one of the favourite authors of the era, churning out formulaic melodramas at a rate of knots.
It's readable, but there's no depth whatever to the characters...the adventures made me think of Enid Blyton for grown-ups! ( )
  starbox | Sep 28, 2013 |
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Celia climbed up the steps to her room slowly, not because she was very tired, but because her room was nearly at the top of Brown's Buildings, and she had learnt that, at any rate, it was well to begin slowly.
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