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The Long Earth by Terry Pratchett
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The Long Earth (edition 2012)

by Terry Pratchett, Stephen Baxter

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingConversations / Mentions
1,8911193,630 (3.59)1 / 116
Member:jmgold
Title:The Long Earth
Authors:Terry Pratchett
Other authors:Stephen Baxter
Info:Harper (2012), Edition: 1St Edition, Hardcover, 352 pages
Collections:Read but unowned
Rating:***
Tags:None

Work details

The Long Earth by Terry Pratchett

  1. 10
    The Long Mars by Terry Pratchett (chwiggy)
  2. 21
    The Magician's Nephew by C. S. Lewis (sturlington)
    sturlington: The concept of The Long Earth reminded me of the wood between the worlds.
  3. 10
    Replay by Ken Grimwood (sandpiper)
    sandpiper: Wonderful science fiction classic about a man who keeps reliving his life.
  4. 01
    Ring Around the Sun by Clifford D. Simak (Gateaupain)
  5. 01
    Dodger by Terry Pratchett (chwiggy)
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English (118)  French (1)  All languages (119)
Showing 1-5 of 118 (next | show all)
I thought the premise of this book is an interesting setup for the start or a story, but kept waiting for something (anything!) to happen or something (anything!) to be explained. Well enough written to keep me reading through to the end, but I'm not going to waste my time on more in the series. ( )
  JudyGibson | Jul 17, 2016 |
"Normally, when there was nothing to do, he listened to the Silence . . . "
  MerrittGibsonLibrary | Jul 6, 2016 |
This feels like it was written for teens or television, or maybe both for that matter. The Long Earth is long on imagery, not that the concept behind the book is lacking, and I can easily picture it as a multi-season HBO series with an episode for each of the exotic parallel earths. The main characters provide the eyes these worlds are viewed through but not much else - other than the heavily baited hook at the end of this first volume. If you, like me, want some sense of conclusion even in a book that's part of a series, the ending will leave you disappointed. ( )
  wandaly | Jun 30, 2016 |
The world as we know it is just one of a (possibly infinite) number of parallel worlds that can be "stepped" between. Joshua, a natural stepper, sets out to explore further than anyone has ever gone before, with an artificial intelligence named Lobsang and a giant hi-tech airship. It's a very entertaining book as one would expect from the authors, it is hard to say where each had their input as the whole works together very well. Then end sets up nicely for the next in the series and I've started reading already. ( )
  eclecticdodo | Jun 21, 2016 |
I am not sure about this book. Check out why in my review: http://girlsguidetoscifi.blogspot.ca/2013/03/east-or-west-review-of-long-earth.h....

( )
  HollyBest | Jun 9, 2016 |
Showing 1-5 of 118 (next | show all)
The Long Earth harkens back to the old SF of the Fifties and Sixties, which revelled in the delight of discovering new worlds. But Pratchett and Baxter have essentially democratised space exploration, taking the joy of finding new Edens out of the hands of rocket-owning millionaires and governments and giving it to the masses. This is an accessible, fun and thoughtful SF novel that offers the potential for a multitude of stories as great as the myriad of Earths.
 
The Long Earth is a short read: the pages riffle past and there's much to enjoy. The dialogue is a bit Hollywood 101, and much of it is characters explaining things to other characters, sometimes at great length ("Why are you telling me all this?" Joshua asks at one point, with apparent ingenuousness). But it's a charming, absorbing and somehow spacious piece of imagineering for all that.
added by melmore | editThe Guardian, Adam Roberts (Jun 20, 2012)
 

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Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Terry Pratchettprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Baxter, Stephenmain authorall editionsconfirmed
Stevens, Michael FentonNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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For Lyn and Rhianna, as always
T.P.

For Sandra
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In a forest glade:
Private Percy woke up to birdsong.
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Book description
1916: the Western Front, France. Private Percy Blakeney wakes up. He is lying on fresh spring grass. He can hear birdsong, and the wind in the leaves in the trees. Where has the mud, blood and blasted landscape of No man's Land gone?

2015: Madison, Wisconsin. Cop Monica Jansson has returned to the burned-out home of one Willis Linsay, a reclusive and some said mad, others dangerous, scientist. It was arson but, as is often the way, the firemen seem to have caused more damage than the fire itself. Stepping through the wreck of a house, there's no sign of any human remains but on the mantelpiece Monica finds a curious gadget - a box, containing some wiring, a three-way switch and a...potato. It is the prototype of an invention that Linsay called a 'stepper'. An invention he put up on the web for all the world to see, and use, an invention that would to change the way mankind viewed his world Earth for ever. And that's an understatement if ever there was one...

...because the stepper allowed the person using it to step sideways into another America, another Earth, and if you kept on stepping, you kept on entering even more Earths...this is the Long Earth. It's not our Earth but one of chain of parallel worlds, lying side by side each differing from its neighbour by really very little (or actually quite a lot). It's an infinite chain, offering 'steppers' an infinite landscape of infinite possibilities. And the further away you travel, the stranger - and sometimes more dangerous - the Earths get. The sun and moon always shine, the basic laws of physics are the same. However, the chance events which have shaped our particular Earth, such as the dinosaur-killer asteroid impact, might not have happened and things may well have turned out rather differently.

But, until Willis Linsay invented his stepper, only our Earth hosted mankind...or so we thought. Because it turns out there are some people who are natural 'steppers', who don't need his invention and now the great migration has begun
Haiku summary

Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0062067753, Hardcover)

The possibilities are endless. (Just be careful what you wish for. . . .)

1916: The Western Front. Private Percy Blakeney wakes up. He is lying on fresh spring grass. He can hear birdsong and the wind in the leaves. Where have the mud, blood, and blasted landscape of no-man's-land gone? For that matter, where has Percy gone?

2015: Madison, Wisconsin. Police officer Monica Jansson is exploring the burned-out home of a reclusive—some say mad, others allege dangerous—scientist who seems to have vanished. Sifting through the wreckage, Jansson find a curious gadget: a box containing some rudimentary wiring, a three-way switch, and . . . a potato. It is the prototype of an invention that will change the way humankind views the world forever.

The first novel in an exciting new collaboration between Discworld creator Terry Pratchett and the acclaimed SF writer Stephen Baxter, The Long Earth transports readers to the ends of the earth—and far beyond. All it takes is a single step. . . .

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:09:57 -0400)

(see all 4 descriptions)

1916: The Western Front. Private Percy Blakeney wakes up. He is lying on fresh spring grass. He can hear birdsong and the wind in the leaves. Where have the mud, blood, and blasted landscape of no-man's-land gone? For that matter, where has Percy gone? 2015: Madison, Wisconsin. Police officer Monica Jansson is exploring the burned-out home of a reclusive--some say mad, others allege dangerous--scientist who seems to have vanished. Sifting through the wreckage, Jansson find a curious gadget: a box containing some rudimentary wiring, a three-way switch, and a potato. It is the prototype of an invention that will change the way humankind views the world forever. The "stepper" enables a person using it to step sideways into another America, another wherever that person happened to be, another Earth. And if the person using it keeps on stepping, they keep on entering even more Earths. This is the Long Earth. And the further away a stepper travels, the stranger -- and sometimes more dangerous -- the Earths become.… (more)

(summary from another edition)

» see all 7 descriptions

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