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Revealing Eden (Save the Pearls Part One) by…
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Revealing Eden (Save the Pearls Part One) (edition 2012)

by Victoria Foyt

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8343145,226 (2.97)2
Member:mrsmonnandez
Title:Revealing Eden (Save the Pearls Part One)
Authors:Victoria Foyt
Info:Sand Dollar Press Inc. (2012), Hardcover, 320 pages
Collections:Your library
Rating:****
Tags:None

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Revealing Eden by Victoria Foyt

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What a load of racist shit. Avoid this book at all costs. I'm glad I got a pirated copy to check out.



Reading this because I have heard so many horrible things about it. I have to see if it is just asshats attacking a book they are jealous they didn't write or it is as awful as something like 50 Shades of Grey. ( )
  AutumnTurner | Dec 29, 2013 |
Read the full review at Witchmag's Boekenplank

*I received a free copy through Netgalley in exchange for my honest opinion*

What an amazing story! Victoria Foyt has a very engaging writing style. I was easily sucked into the story and only with the greatest effort did I manage to let it go afterwards. Foyt describes a fascinating and at the same time frightening world after an apocalypse. A world were your skin color determines your caste, your chance of finding a mate and the jobs you’re allowed to do. It felt like we’re back to the times of slave traders and such, but with a twist. This time people with a darker skin are superior to the “pearls”. It was very intriguing to read about this kind of future. I was surprised with myself that I found this book this interesting, since I’m usually not so fond of everything dystopia. But not this one!

The Jaguar Man was also quite appealing. It was not a real shapeshifter or werewolf, but something in between. And with a scientific background! Not something I encounter often and very refreshing! It gave a whole new perspective on my favorite genre. I quite liked this vision of a beastly man with well proportioned… everything ^^ And of course beastly behavior. Jummy! I really liked the growling and sometimes cave men behavior ;)

That said it’s quite obvious I like, even loved, Ronson Bramford. He’s a beastly handsome, bad guy, hunk with a lot of emotional baggage, always there to rescue Eden from her next escapade gone wrong *rolls eyes at Eden*. Aka the dream of every woman, or at least mine ;) And the commitment he has! For her and everyone else he considers part of his family. That made him rise to the top of my list with most dreamy men ^^

And then there was Eden. As you noticed with my eye roll I wasn’t that happy with her. For the first part of the story at least. During that time she was a naïve, egoistic, fickle, distrustful person, who refused to really “open” her eyes and see the world in a new light. The results are quite annoying and too predictable for words. I had to put the book away, repeatedly, cause I just couldn’t stand her behavior anymore. The compelling writing style and the HUNK, however, managed to bring me back every time. And I’m glad for it. Cause she had her HALLELUJAH moment. Thank god. And afterwards she became a more likable person. Someone who doesn’t only think of herself, is able to see what the consequences are and has opened her mind to new things. I finally grew to like her!

Conclusion

4 HEARTS. It’s a very compelling book, with an engaging world and interesting story. It features one of the most dream worthy hunks I’ve ever come across in a book. Only drawback was Eden’s behavior. Fortunately she sees the light halfway and from then on I grew to love her and is this book a joy to read. ( )
  Iris-Boekenplank | Dec 21, 2013 |
Hailing from the nonexistent category of African-American readers, I'm here today to say this book exceeded expectations.

It is even more awful than anyone told me or I could've imagined. I question why Goodreads won't let me just give this zero stars as an exception. In point form:

- Your world-building is bad and you should feel bad.
Now, I know everyone is jumping on the YA Lit dystopia bandwagon to become the next Hunger Games, but in the very least, you need internally consistent logic. Melanin is not a radiation filter.

- Eden makes Edmund Pevensie look sweet and even-tempered and Bella Swan merely misguided.

- You cannot have a race name double as a racial slur, and judging by everyone's reaction to Eden's outburst, Coal is not complimentary.

- On that note, really? Pearl is the closest you can get to derogatory but coal (a dirty pollutant) in an environmental dystopia is supposed to be good?

- With an issue like race in a position of privilege you have to be very delicate with how you choose to explore that theme. Foyt uses a sledgehammer.

- How many times can you describe your black male characters as overtly sexual and violent without feeling like you're NOT AT ALL subverting stereotypes?

- Also Eden can keep calling her black female boss doing her job, a bitch. Even when the men are cruel they're ~sexy~ but Ashina? That haughty bitch. That's really turning stereotypes on their heads you guys.

- If there is an imperative to mate and they need more children why would they limit everyone to a child each? That's not even replacing the parents.

- The father speaks like a bad Sherlock fanfiction. Stop calling your own daughter, Daught.

- The sentence structure is god awful.

- Bramford has a name even if he is part leopard. Eden knows him. Why would she start calling him El Tigre? Not to mention, in case I forgot, he is called beastly every third sentence.

- I'm going to let someone else handle the portrayal of the Native people in this book. “Residue from oil mining,” her father said, indicating the murky water. “My hypothesis is the tribe sold their oil rights long ago, probably for worthless cash. I suspect no one ever explained the consequences.”...nope.

- If anyone has special snowflake disease it's Eden. She's not an animal, she exclaims! She won't eat the Native people's food. It's like vomit, and she spits it out. She wishes she had meal pills! Wahhhh where is her Life-Band? Whine. Whine. Whine.

- "Eden yearned to caress his savage face but feared he might hit her." pg 97. This is not romantic. What is with modern YA Lit and romanticizing creepy situations?

- I have nothing to say about that mess of an ending or the preachiness of colourblindness. From a person of colour, who racism affects in the real world, this is a piss poor examination what racism is like. Also colourblindness is exclusively a white privilege because you can't be ignorant of something that systematically affects you. What on earth is wrong with acknowledging race and discrimination and its effects on others' experiences and actively being sensitive to such?

Edit:
- How could I forget the blackface? Which is both because Coals don't like looking at pearls and it's illegal or some such nonsense. She describes putting on red lipstick in a way to make her lips look bigger. Get it? Big lips. Because black people have them -_-"
( )
  newskepticx | Dec 18, 2013 |
A variety of reactions to this book:




( )
  Rinnreads | Sep 24, 2013 |
This book starts out with this society that's mostly underground because of the stifling heat of the Earth, which isn't really a new concept in science fiction, what's particularly unique to this novel is that instead of adjusting technologically, a caste system evolves which puts the darkest skin color, Coals, and the top, and the lightest at the bottoms, Pearls and then Cottons (albinos).

Then it gets a little odd, for whatever reason the main character's father decides it'd be a cool idea to make a human/panther/hawk/anaconda hybrid. So not long after this is the first thing I find a fault with, the fact that Eden attempts to disobey her deathbed promise to her mother to save her dog, Bramford stops her, and her dog dies. Okay, but... she only mentions this dog that she was going to die for and give up her mother's deathbed promise in passing, with no emotion. There were no tears. I mean yeah, she was a bit busy, but she could have spared a few tears/rage against Bramford for stopping her from saving the dog she dearly loves. It would have been a moment for me to connect to Eden, having two dogs of my own. But, no, she just sort of forgets about it except in passing.

Next, the bestial part. I was expecting a "Sci-fi Beauty and the Beast" which I thought would be neat and very different, I was looking forward to it, however, this isn't the case. In Beauty and the Beast we love it because although Beast is ugly, love overcomes that. This is not how it goes in Revealing Eden. Instead, Eden Newman just happens to be into panther/human hybrids and thinks they're pretty sexy. And says this, many times over. Good for her, and him I guess, but it doesn't help with the "I don't identify with the main character" syndrome I have going on at this point, which only intensifies as the novel goes on. Not to mention Eden is reminiscent of those girls in high school that care WAY too much about getting a boyfriend, which makes sense in her society sure, since she has to mate by 18 otherwise she's cast off without her happy drugs, but... I think her thoughts and desires could have been better written to not grate on my nerves so much. Seriously that is about all Eden thinks about. Does she have any actual personality traits? Who knows. I mean, that is what it comes down to, the writing just isn't everything it could be.

Then there was the romance, which was off-putting because Eden spends the majority of the novel going: "Wow, he sure is sexy" "GOD YOU'RE SUCH A JERK" "but man are you sexy" "you don't understand me!!!!!" which turns me off because she really, really just needs to make up her mind.

So yeah, the idea of the book was a lot more interesting than the book itself, the writing was definitely lacking and I thought the novel would have done better if it had been kept inside the society in the beginning and worked a little more with the Pearl/Coal aspect, instead we get some sort of survival jungle novel that could have very well happened without the dystopia part--which was the part that interested me to begin with. I will say I do like the idea of Eden's journey of revealing herself, becoming what she refers to as "Real Eden" that she hadn't been allowed to do previously. ( )
  lovelylime | Sep 21, 2013 |
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0983650322, Hardcover)

Eden Newman must mate before her 18th birthday in six months or she'll be left outside to die in a burning world. But who will pick up her mate-option when she's cursed with white skin and a tragically low mate-rate of 15%? In a post-apocalyptic, totalitarian, underground world where class and beauty are defined by resistance to an overheated environment, Eden's coloring brands her as a member of the lowest class, a weak and ugly Pearl. If only she can mate with a dark-skinned Coal from the ruling class, she'll be safe. Just maybe one Coal sees the Real Eden and will be her salvation her co-worker Jamal has begun secretly dating her. But when Eden unwittingly compromises her father's secret biological experiment, she finds herself in the eye of a storm and thrown into the last area of rainforest, a strange and dangerous land. Eden must fight to save her father, who may be humanity's last hope, while standing up to a powerful beast-man she believes is her enemy, despite her overwhelming attraction. Eden must change to survive but only if she can redefine her ideas of beauty and of love, along with a little help from her "adopted aunt" Emily Dickinson.

(retrieved from Amazon Mon, 30 Sep 2013 13:54:33 -0400)

Eden Newman must mate before her 18th birthday in six months or she'll be left outside to die in a burning world. But who will pick up her mate-option when she's cursed with white skin and a tragically low mate-rate of 15%? In a post-apocalyptic, totalitarian, underground world where class and beauty are defined by resistance to an overheated environment, Eden's coloring brands her as a member of the lowest class, a weak and ugly Pearl. If only she can mate with a dark-skinned Coal from the ruling class, she'll be safe. Just maybe one Coal sees the Real Eden and will be her salvation?her co-worker Jamal has begun secretly dating her. But when Eden unwittingly compromises her father's secret biological experiment, she finds herself in the eye of a storm?and thrown into the last area of rainforest, a strange and dangerous land. Eden must fight to save her father, who may be humanity's last hope, while standing up to a powerful beast-man she believes is her enemy, despite her overwhelming attraction. Eden must change to survive but only if she can redefine her ideas of beauty and of love, along with a little help from her adopted aunt Emily Dickinson.… (more)

(summary from another edition)

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Victoria Foyt chatted with LibraryThing members from Feb 27, 2012 to Mar 2, 2012. Read the chat.

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