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Don Rodriguez by Lord Dunsany
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Don Rodriguez (1922)

by Lord Dunsany

Other authors: See the other authors section.

Series: The Chronicles of Shadow Valley (1)

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198259,376 (3.78)13
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» See also 13 mentions

Showing 2 of 2
in the world before Tolkien, lord Dunsany had a considerable reputation as a learned and witty fantasist. This is his take on the mental world also illuminated by Miguel Cervantes. It is a pleasant fantasy and quite a fun read. the writers in this genre thought it quite fitting that he be included in the Del Rey collection of ancestors of tolkien. ( )
  DinadansFriend | Feb 25, 2018 |
With Lord Dunsany it is all about the *way* he writes - that very ornate British thing. A Sancho Panza tripping through a fantasy Spain, set to accompany a guy on a quest (who has just lost his inheritance). ( )
  dbsovereign | Jan 26, 2016 |
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» Add other authors (2 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Lord Dunsanyprimary authorall editionscalculated
るうにい, まりのIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Carter, LinIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
葵, 原翻訳secondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Pepper, BobCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Sime, Sidney H.Illustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Warmenhoven, RobertTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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After long and patient research I am still unable to give the reader of these Chronicles the exact date of the times that they tell of. (Chronology)
Being convinced that his end had nearly come, and having lived long on earth (and all those years in Spain, in the golden time), the Lord of the Valleys of Arguento Harez, whose heights see not Valladolid, called for his eldest son.
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 159818928X, Paperback)

After long and patient research I am still unable to give to the reader of these Chronicles the exact date of the times that they tell of. Were it merely a matter of history there could be no doubts about the period; but where magic is concerned, to however slight an extent, there must always be some element of mystery, arising partly out of ignorance and partly from the compulsion of those oaths by which magic protects its precincts from the tiptoe of curiosity.

Moreover, magic, even in small quantities, appears to affect time, much as acids affect some metals, curiously changing its substance, until dates seem to melt into a mercurial form that renders them elusive even to the eye of the most watchful historian.

It is the magic appearing in Chronicles III and IV that has gravely affected the date, so that all I can tell the reader with certainty of the period is that it fell in the later years of the Golden Age in Spain.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:14:04 -0400)

When does a classic become new, fresh and extremely relevant? When someone takes it out of an outdated format and makes it readable, searchable and understandable. The Imitation of Christ has been in print for over 500 years for a good reason. It is powerful, beautiful and heart piercing. James Watkins has taken those words and reworked them into ninety daily readings, arranged by topic. Whether for daily devotions or for sound insight into a particular issue, Watkins paraphrase blends the ancient with the modern to introduce this classic to a new audience, speaking to all Christians with credibility and authority and using inclusive language not found in the original.… (more)

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