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Porch Lights: A Novel by Dorothea Benton…
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Porch Lights: A Novel (edition 2012)

by Dorothea Benton Frank

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2941738,184 (3.45)9
Member:writestuff
Title:Porch Lights: A Novel
Authors:Dorothea Benton Frank
Info:William Morrow (2012), Hardcover, 336 pages
Collections:Your library, To read, Review Books To Read
Rating:
Tags:2012 Review Copy, Review Copy(Harper Collins), Women's Fiction

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Porch Lights by Dorothea Benton Frank

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» See also 9 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 17 (next | show all)
Enjoyable audiobook. Well written and kept the reader's attention. ( )
  MHanover10 | Jul 10, 2016 |
This was a thoroughly enjoyable story of a family and how they resolve some life issues. I enjoyed the setting of Sullivan's Island, getting to know a little about Edgar Allen Poe, and most of all the wonderful way the author had of making her characters real. I relate well to many elements of the family. ( )
  rwilliams2911 | Jun 21, 2016 |
If not for the interesting literary references, this would have been a complete loss for me. My biggest obstacle was the annoying main character. ( )
  StephLaymon | Jan 26, 2016 |
My initial thought was that this was the lesser of the three Frank books I've read, but it picked up steam as it went and I ended up enjoying it very much. Frank's stories all have a familiar cast to them, but she manages to make her characters so appealing that it is easy to overlook similarities. ( )
  VashonJim | Sep 5, 2015 |
I have read three of Dorothea Benton Frank's books this week and loved them all - she is such a great storyteller, and mixed with the dynamic sense of humor and wit, keeps you laughing throughout the story. The Last Original Wife was excellent as well --just finished it. If you are from the south you will appreciate all the details of the Lowcountry area, as it makes you homesick to return. (get the audio as the narrator does an excellent job)!


( )
  JudithDCollins | Nov 27, 2014 |
Showing 1-5 of 17 (next | show all)
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When Jimmy McMullen, a fireman with the NYFD, is killed in the line of duty, his wife, Jackie, and ten-year-old son, Charlie, are devastated. Charlie idolized his dad, and now the outgoing, curious boy has become quiet and reserved. Trusting in the healing power of family, Jackie decides to return to her childhood home on Sullivans Island. Crossing the bridge from the mainland, Jackie and Charlie enter a world full of wonder and magic--lush green and chocolate grasslands and dazzling red, orange, and magenta evening skies; the heady pungency of Lowcountry Pluff mud and fresh seafood on the grill; bare toes snuggled in warm sand and palmetto fronds swaying in gentle ocean winds.… (more)

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