HomeGroupsTalkZeitgeist
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

The Death of Reconstruction: Race, Labor,…
Loading...

The Death of Reconstruction: Race, Labor, and Politics in the Post-Civil…

by Heather Cox Richardson

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
42None273,462 (3.75)1
None
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 1 mention

No reviews
Richardson's explanation for the abandonment of black southerners offers an innovative and stimulating perspective. By giving priority to "free labor," rather than equal rights, as the centerpiece of Republican ideology and postwar policy, she emphasizes the significance of economic considerations and also class divisions as explanatory factors in the termination of the party's involvement in the late-nineteenth-century South. Furthermore, the focus on the Republicans' theories about labor after emancipation establishes the political context for the current interest among historians in the origins and nature of the labor system that emerged after emancipation. These are very valuable insights and contributions.
added by eromsted | editReviews in American History, Michael Perman (pay site) (Jun 1, 2002)
 
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Series (with order)
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
Quotations
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Publisher series
Original language

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English (3)

Book description
Haiku summary

Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0674013662, Paperback)

Historians overwhelmingly have blamed the demise of Reconstruction on Southerners' persistent racism. Heather Cox Richardson argues instead that class, along with race, was critical to Reconstruction's end. Northern support for freed blacks and Reconstruction weakened in the wake of growing critiques of the economy and calls for a redistribution of wealth.

Using newspapers, public speeches, popular tracts, Congressional reports, and private correspondence, Richardson traces the changing Northern attitudes toward African-Americans from the Republicans' idealized image of black workers in 1861 through the 1901 publication of Booker T. Washington's Up from Slavery. She examines such issues as black suffrage, disenfranchisement, taxation, westward migration, lynching, and civil rights to detect the trajectory of Northern disenchantment with Reconstruction. She reveals a growing backlash from Northerners against those who believed that inequalities should be addressed through working-class action, and the emergence of an American middle class that championed individual productivity and saw African-Americans as a threat to their prosperity.

The Death of Reconstruction offers a new perspective on American race and labor and demonstrates the importance of class in the post-Civil War struggle to integrate African-Americans into a progressive and prospering nation.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:25:31 -0400)

No library descriptions found.

Quick Links

Swap Ebooks Audio
3 wanted1 pay

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (3.75)
0.5
1
1.5
2
2.5
3 2
3.5
4 1
4.5
5 1

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 119,677,123 books! | Top bar: Always visible