HomeGroupsTalkZeitgeist
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

The Black Death Transformed: Disease and…
Loading...

The Black Death Transformed: Disease and Culture in Early Renaissance…

by Samuel K. Cohn

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
26None415,071 (3.25)4

None.

Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 4 mentions

No reviews
no reviews | add a review
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Series (with order)
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
Quotations
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Publisher series
Original language

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English (3)

Book description
Haiku summary

Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0340706473, Paperback)

The Black Death in Europe, from its arrival in 1347-52 through successive waves into the early modern period, has been seriously misunderstood by historians. This revolutionary account provides compelling evidence that the Black Death could have been almost any disease other than the rat-based bubonic plague whose bacillus was discovered in 1894. Since the late nineteenth century, the rat and flea have stood wrongly accused as the agents of transmission and historians and scientists have uncritically imposed the epidemiology of modern plague on the past.

Unshackled from this misconception, The Black Death Transformed returns to its subject afresh, using sources spread across a huge geographical tract, from Lisbon to Uzbekistan, Sicily to Scotland and more than 40,000 death documents (from last wills and testaments to the earliest surviving burial records), over 400 chronicles, 250 plague tracts, 50 saints' lives, merchant letters and many more. These sources confirm the terror of the medieval plague, the rapidity of its spread, and the utter despondency left in the wake of its first strike. But they also point to significant differences between the medieval and modern bubonic plague, none more significant than the ability of humans to acquire natural immunity to the former but not the latter.

Samuel K. Cohn is a professor at the University of Glasgow.

The Black Death in Europe, from its arrival in 1347-52 through successive waves into the early modern period, has been seriously misunderstood by historians. This revolutionary account provides compelling evidence that the Black Death could have been almost any disease other than the rat-based bubonic plague whose bacillus was discovered in 1894. Since the late nineteenth century, the rat and flea have stood wrongly accused as the agents of transmission and historians and scientists have uncritically imposed the epidemiology of modern plague on the past.

Unshackled from this misconception, The Black Death Transformed returns to its subject afresh, using sources spread across a huge geographical tract, from Lisbon to Uzbekistan, Sicily to Scotland and more than 40,000 death documents (from last wills and testaments to the earliest surviving burial records), over 400 chronicles, 250 plague tracts, 50 saints' lives, merchant letters and many more. These sources confirm the terror of the medieval plague, the rapidity of its spread, and the utter despondency left in the wake of its first strike. But they also point to significant differences between the medieval and modern bubonic plague, none more significant than the ability of humans to acquire natural immunity to the former but not the latter.

"A work of revisionism that holds most other studies up to close scrutiny, this is an important book and one that demands careful reading. Cohn's encyclopedic and polyglot command of the secondary sources, combined with the sheer volume of records that he has scoured for his evidence, presents a dense and detailed read...A serious revisionist study...essential reading for any scholar whose work touches on the plague or the Renaissance."—History: Reviews of New Books

"A work of revisionism that holds most other studies up to close scrutiny, this is an important book and one that demands careful reading. Cohn's encyclopedic and polyglot command of the secondary sources, combined with the sheer volume of records that he has scoured for his evidence, presents a dense and detailed read...A serious revisionist study...essential reading for any scholar whose work touches on the plague or the Renaissance."—History: Reviews of New Books

"A wealth of information."—Death Studies

"Delightfully readable. Conveys an ambitious and ultimately convincing argument in precise, often amusing prose. Cohn displays a combination of academic rigor and the ability to render the complex intriguing."—The Independent

 

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:08:11 -0400)

(see all 2 descriptions)

No library descriptions found.

Quick Links

Swap Ebooks Audio
11 wanted

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (3.25)
0.5
1
1.5
2
2.5
3 3
3.5
4 1
4.5
5

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

You are using the new servers! | About | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 116,986,775 books! | Top bar: Always visible